Image Weavers: In Honor of the Spirit of Toni Cade Bambara

November 24, 2014
By
ImageWeavers' Twentieth Anniversary Reunion, 
October 25, 2014
L-R Mee Lin Yuk, Roxana Walker Canton, Anula Shetty, Tina Morton, Stephanie Yarbrough, Miyoshi Smith, Nikki Harmon, Asake Denise Jones, Yvonne Marie Jones, Aishah Shahidah Simmons, NaOme Richardson
Photograph: ©Roxana Walker-Canton

NaOme Richardson: Consequently TCB opened the door of learning how to express oneself through words and images for several of the women who became Image Weavers. Their entrance into her world of expressing through images and words, encouragement and sharing was duly rewarded.
Read more »

Becoming…

November 24, 2014
By
Nikki Harmon

Nikki Harmon: When all my dreams were up for grabs, when youth and energy and the righteousness of self-expression defined my existence. When art was activism and activism was art and we created ourselves right into existence.
Read more »

No Doubt: Your Mission, if You Choose to Accept it, is to Make Revolution Irresistible

November 24, 2014
By
NP Photo

Nadine Patterson: Her knowledge was all-encompassing. And then she would break it down. To paraphrase her: “Everyone in Western culture dreams in five parts. There are other ways of telling stories, but this is how we dream. Use it. Record your dreams from the last image before you wake up and trace your dream backwards. What images and sounds remain with you are the ones that are the most...
Read more »

Fondness for Toni Cade Bambara

November 24, 2014
By
Toni Cade Bambara
©Susan J. Ross

Miyoshi Smith: When Toni Cade moved to Philadelphia, I would see her out, at socials…and gosh, she was just a very remarkable person: smart, witty, pretty, gifted in living and writing. Her work represents, I think, her love for humanity and what she felt and believed.
Read more »

Black Blessings: Toni Cade Bambara and Octavia E. Butler

November 23, 2014
By
Ayana A. H. Jamieson

Ayana A. H. Jamieson: I never had a chance to meet these two women in person, but they exist in the imaginal spaces created by their words. I read their letters as long distance conversations simultaneously situated in and transcending both time and place. Like the grandmothers, mothers, aunties, and other-mothers in our individual lives, Miz Toni and Mama Octavia exchange more than words and ideas.
Read more »

One Thing: Toni Cade Bambara in the Speaking Everyday

November 23, 2014
By
kai

So when The Salt Eaters or any of Toni Cade Bambara’s life-saving works fall off my bookshelf, or a scene from her literary creation shows up in my dream, or a number of people start mentioning her name to me, I think there is a message or at least an alert, urging me to go back to one of the most persistent lessons that The Salt Eaters offers me...
Read more »

Unleashing the Power of the Soul: Spirit and Spirituality through Toni Cade Bambara’s The Salt Eaters and John Bolling’s The Spirit of the Soul (Part II)

November 23, 2014
By
The Salt Eaters (new)

Dr. Janice Liddell: This is the power that Bambara reclaims for women and this power is the “force” of the novel. Minnie, as healer, in fact, is not unlike Jesus who upon encountering the infirmed man in Jerusalem queries him, “Do you want to be made whole?” (John 5:6). Minnie, obviously Africentric with her” bright-red flouncy dress,” “two different strips of kinte,” “a minor fortune of gold, brass and...
Read more »

Unleashing the Power of the Soul: Spirit and Spirituality through Toni Cade Bambara’s The Salt Eaters and John Bolling’s The Spirit of the Soul (Part I)

November 22, 2014
By
Dr. Janice Liddell

Dr. Janice Liddell: However, in order for peoples of African descent and people of other “soul centered” cultures (Asian, Indians, Aborigines, etc.) to achieve balance and wholeness at the levels of the personal and the community, they must recognize the existence and understand the nature of these two “planes of reality.” Then, even more importantly, they must be able to (re)discover, (re)claim, and integrate fully, the soul-centered worldview of...
Read more »

Resembling a Revolutionary: My Sister Toni

November 21, 2014
By
Photo Credit: John Pinderhughes

Malaika Adero: She read people; she read me. Stopped by my little house in Southwest Atlanta in the mid-80s and said, “You need to go to New York.” She came with a typed list that she wrote notes on for me as we talked. Check out the Clark Center for dance, Cheryll Green and Marie Brown for what’s happening on the publishing scene, John O. Killens for his writers’...
Read more »

Remembering Toni

November 21, 2014
By
alice lovelace (Nic Paget-Clarke) US Social Forum 2007

Alice Lovelace: Her questions gently guided me to claim my life as a writer. Through the years, Toni asked me many questions that lead to me owning my gifts. Her questions led me to the realization that I was a natural teacher. Her questions forced me to value my writing and to request payment for my performances. She guided me to a place where I could claim my job...
Read more »

In ‘My Solitude’ with Toni Cade Bambara

November 21, 2014
By
Pamela A. Hooks

Pamela Hooks: She opened my world, opened my eyes. I saw the political and poetry in everything now. Together, Toni and Njeri would break down everything with a fine tooth comb—from the politics of government cheese to the best places to find vegetarian food or chicken wings and then stuck the bush comb pick firmly into the back of all of it to bring it back to the...
Read more »

Follow The Feminist Wire

Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

Princeton University Post Doc: Apply Now!