In Conversation: On Race and Racism, Progression and Stagnation

August 8, 2014
By
gotprivilege

By Timothy Patrick McCarthy and Darnell L. Moore This is a second conversation in a dialogue series initially published here at The Feminist Wire.  Timothy Patrick McCarthy (TPM): We’ve both had some unpleasant encounters recently with white critics, who have derisively called you a “blacktivist,” who have called me “self-hating” and “irresponsible.” In a moment of exasperation a few weeks ago, I texted you the question: “how do you deal...
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Op-Ed: Why We Need Critical Ethnic Studies in Arizona (and Everywhere Else)

August 7, 2014
By
critical ethnic studies in Arizona

By Michelle Téllez I find it imperative to call attention to the disconnect between Ethnic Studies as a discipline and the communities from which it emerged. Universities, and many individual faculty members, have largely abandoned the original critical impetus. I started graduate school at the cusp of the new millennium, following a three-year run as an elementary school teacher. There I sought answers to some deep-seated questions I had...
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Getting on Up: The Cult of the Charismatic Black Man

August 6, 2014
By
jill scott

Charismatic black men slapping black women around are funny.  This was the takeaway conveyed by some audience members at a screening I attended of the new James Brown biopic Get On Up at a predominantly black theater in Los Angeles. Largely sidestepping the chronic abuse Brown inflicted on multiple spouses (Brown served jail time for domestic violence), the film all but deifies him as an uncompromising god-fearing, rugged individualist...
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On Feeling Depleted: Naming, Confronting, and Surviving Oppression in the Academy

August 5, 2014
By
academic industrial complex

By Nicole Nguyen and R. Tina Catania “There is a politics to exhaustion. Feeling depleted can be a measure of just what we are up against.” Meet Stuart. He’s a fellow doctoral student. Watching Stuart – a white, able-bodied, middle-class man – for a short time, one sees the ease with which he glides through the academy’s hallways. Stuart pops into professors’ offices and tosses around passages from Das Kapital...
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Touching Base with Tayari Jones: An Interview on Black Female Writers and Readers

July 31, 2014
By
Tayari Jones

By Eve Dunbar Tayari Jones attended a brunch in Brooklyn to which I was also invited a few weeks ago.  Seven-deep in the a living room of our mutual friend, Tricia, the brunch party flitted from considering who among us would fight if threatened with being ”jumped“ by one of our students after class to the best pedagogical approach to the “N-Word” within the racially mixed classrooms that many...
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Who would we be if we did not speak? A letter for Yara

July 31, 2014
By
Who would we be if we did not speak?  A letter for Yara

“A dream will make us fight to see it come true. An expectation will lead to passivity and probably to disappointment.” ~ Mu Sochua On June 21, 2014, in Cairo, Egypt, a 28-year old Egyptian activist Yara Sallam was arrested by the authorities for participating in a peaceful demonstration calling for the repeal of the Protest and Public Assembly Law (Law 107). Yara, along with 24 other activists were...
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Op-Ed: Why Buzzfeed’s Birth Control Activism Is Appreciated but Misguided

July 30, 2014
By
Opened_Oral_Birth_Control

By Kari O’Driscoll On July 16, Buzzfeed asked their female employees to answer the question, “Why do you take birth control pills?” Twenty-two of them responded by writing their answers on a large sketch pad and having their photograph taken. To date, there have been more than two million views of the project, with organizations like NARAL touting the effort to put a face on the issue that exploded...
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Dear White Gay Men: A Letter from Two of You

July 28, 2014
By
Christian Fuscarino and Guido Sanchez

See, that’s the thing, we are all oppressed in certain ways, and we all occupy the position of the oppressor in other ways, but in some attempt to reconcile that contradiction, we want to believe that victimhood gives us carte blanche, that we are automatically on the more inclusive, aware, and equitable side of the curve. And arguably that’s the most dangerous position to occupy.
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Love in a Time of Contingency: A Letter to Women’s and Gender Studies

July 24, 2014
By
contingent faculty

I came to women’s and gender studies as many do: on a search for answers. Between the pages of Patricia Hill Collins and Gloria Anzaldúa, Judith Butler and Donna Haraway, I began to find them. I started to heal from an abusive relationship that shaped my teens and early 20s. I came to understand the structural causes of racism, sexism, homophobia, and transphobia, and how these were all linked...
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Op-Ed: Feminism and the PIC: Why “Add-Incarceration-and-Stir” Doesn’t Cut It

July 14, 2014
By
Feminism and the PIC

By Jeanne Flavin and Laura Huss Many mainstream feminist and prochoice groups have been reluctant to adopt intersectional approaches and to declare common cause with other progressive movements. Yet the advent of mass incarceration and the prison industrial complex (PIC) makes clear that securing women’s reproductive health and rights requires our full-on and intersectional engagement. We must reject an “add prisons and stir” approach to advocacy in favor of...
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A Latina’s Perspective on MBK

July 11, 2014
By
JEWEL SAMAD:AFP:Getty Images

On July 10, women of color spoke out on President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) policy initiative, in a webinar sponsored by the African American Policy Forum. The 90-minute webinar followed a June 17th letter signed by over 1,400 women of color from all walks of life—activists, artists, nurses, teachers, day laborers, students, academics, mothers, community leaders, and business owners, identifying as straight, queer, and transgender, and calling for...
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Arts & Culture

  • “Paws” by Tracy Burkholder tracy

    Paws   In sixth grade, I started to envy certain girls’ hands. Not always manicured, but always neat. Fingers thin and smooth. These hands gently freed sheets of paper from their metal spirals and lifted loops of hair to more beautiful perches. Lunch trays floated inside their gentle grip while […]

  • 3 Poems by Holly Mitchell holly

    Slipping Under   Like a ghost, I prepare a bath behind a door   that hasn’t locked long as I remember.   When my mother or grandmother knocks at the open door,   I obscure what they call my “new breasts” under the soap water   and focus on the […]

  • Excerpts from Damnation by Janice Lee janice

    CONFESSION Sometimes one willingly enters a dark and empty space, the creaking of the loose boards below, the phantom moonlight above. · I had a dream that I was carrying a wounded deer in my arms. He lay there limp, depending on me completely and solely for the permission to […]