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TFW on winter break for the month of December

December 2, 2014
By
Autumn-with-winter

Dearest Readers, Thank you for your continued support. We absolutely love that you love us and that you value and support our work. However, we are tired and in need of some R&R. TFW is an invisible labor of feminist love. We do this work because we love it and because we deeply care about the issues. As mentioned previously, ”We want to fill your inboxes and computer screens...
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Breaking News: An Open Letter of Love to Black Students: #BlackLivesMatter Dec

December 8, 2014
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Breaking News: An Open Letter of Love to Black Students: #BlackLivesMatter Dec

By blackspaceblog We are Black professors. We are daughters, sons, brothers, sisters, cousins, nieces, nephews, godchildren, grandfathers, grandmothers, fathers, and mothers. We’re writing to tell you we see you and hear you. We know the stories of dolls hanging by nooses, nigger written on dry erase boards and walls, stories of nigger said casually at parties by White students too drunk to know their own names but who know...
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Black Lives Matter / Black Life Matters: A Conversation with Patrisse Cullors and Darnell L. Moore

December 1, 2014
By
Black Lives Matter

In January 2015, The Feminist Wire and the University of Arizona will co-host the Black Life Matters conference in Tucson, Arizona. Free and open to the public, the event aims to build on the visionary work of Black Lives Matter and a surge of activism emerging from the murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. We understand that our event, like many others, is not an isolated occasion but...
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Afterword: Toni Cade Bambara’s Living Legacy

November 29, 2014
By
Heidi R. Lewis and Aishah Shahidah SImmons, NWSA 2014
photograph: Tracy Fisher

#BambaraOnTFW Sixty-nine essays, remembrances, love notes, poems, and videos and thirteen days later, my sister co-curator and co-editor, Heidi Renée Lewis and I are closing The Feminist Wire’s online celebration in honor of daughter, mother, sister, writer, organizer, filmmaker, activist, and cultural worker Toni Cade Bambara. Heidi and I started our Bambara journey together at the end of our work on The Feminist Wire’s forum in honor of Black...
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Love Note to Toni

November 28, 2014
By
Photograph-of-Dr.-Beverly-Guy-Sheftall-300x225

Beverly Guy-Sheftall: So, five years after you joined the ancestors, the Women’s Center calls your name and honors your work. We celebrate with your friends, comrades, students, community organizers, professors, filmmakers, writers, agitators, and your daughter, Karma Bene Bambara Smith, and her growing family. We are deeply indebted to Karma for the precious gift of your personal papers, which she donated in 2004 to the Spelman College Archives and...
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Toni Cade Bambara: ‘…an uptown Griot’

November 28, 2014
By
Clarke IX

Cheryl Clarke: The Black Woman: An Anthology from 1970, which Toni edited...is still one of the books I live by. Really, until Barbara Smith and Lorraine Bethel edited Conditions: Five, the Black Women's Issue in 1979, The Black Woman and Gerda Lerner's Black Women in White America were really the only two works that addressed black women's expressivity and history in relation to feminism. So, Toni Cade Bambara is...
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Liberation Legacy: Fifteen Years of the Toni Cade Bambara Scholar-Activism Program and Conferences at Spelman College, 2000-2015

November 28, 2014
By
Toni Cade Bambara Scholar-Activism Conference
courtesy: ©Malika Redmond

M. Bahati Kuumba and Malika Redmond: The Toni Cade Bambara Scholar-Activism Conference happens in March during Women’s History Month on or near Bambara’s birthday. It is both a celebration of her audacious body of work on behalf of Black people and gives students the opportunity to set the conference agenda, take charge of conference logistics, present scholarly work, and hear from scholar-activists in and outside of the Atlanta...
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Toni Cade Bambara: The Moment In-Between

November 27, 2014
By
Traylor headshot

Eleanor Traylor: Since then, we became communicants like those described in “the Johnson Girls” in Gorilla. And our talk, like those girls, was self-fashioning talk. Yes, we were hip as the “fly” hats and dresses that Paula Baldwin Whaley made.
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Bambara: What She Meant To Us/Me

November 27, 2014
By
Picture1

There is brilliance and bravery written here, among the cultures of masculinity and “men run it.” There is a clear message here for the youthful years and innocent eyes of “I’ll make us a world” students. Toni Cade Bambara, in her critical, original and singular anthology The Black Woman (1970), opened the door for serious dialogue among young women and young men, like myself, who were deeply involved in...
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And The Beat Goes On: Toni Cade Bambara

November 27, 2014
By
Dr. Gloria I. Joseph
©Susan J Ross

Dr. Gloria I. Joseph: Toni Cade Bambara’s talents and intellect were indeed, outstanding. Her range of knowledge was extensive as was repeatedly demonstrated during conversations and through her writings. The fact that this “knowledgeable information” flowed so easily from Toni and the manner in which she seemingly automatically, reached conclusions and swiftly got to the bottom line of discussions/ conversations, is demonstrative of genius quality.
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The Seabirds Don’t Lie

November 26, 2014
By
LauraBrooklyn

Laura Whitehorn: Rubbish, really, and you showed me so later, narrating the tale of similar idiocies from liberals visiting a Black southern community, romanticizing what they saw and in so doing, insulting the intelligence and discounting the creativity of the community they were visiting. Be honest, you said, without exactly saying it, solidarity can’t flower from bullshit.
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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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