Posts Tagged ‘ entertainment ’

The Black Sitcom: A Representation We Can Be Proud Of

July 8, 2013
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By Jeanine Russaw When you look in the mirror, how do you see yourself? In a perfect world, whenever a black woman looks in a mirror, she would see herself as the beautiful, confident, and intelligent person she truly is. This ideal can be difficult to achieve when “Little Janet” returns home from a day of...
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Posted in Black Women, College Feminisms, Culture, Entertainment | 12 Comments »

Feminists We Love: Michele Wallace (Video)

June 21, 2013
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Michele Wallace, Professor of English, Women’s Studies and Film Studies at the City College of New York and the City University of NY Graduate Center, Ph.D. in Cinema Studies, New York University is author of Black Macho and the Myth of the Superwoman (1979), Black Popular Culture: A Project by Michele Wallace (1991), Dark Designs and Visual Culture (2005) andInvisibility...
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Posted in Academia, Black Women, Entertainment, Feminists We Love, Sexism | 12 Comments »

No “Madea” in Tyler Perry’s New Drama, “The Haves and the Have-Nots,” But Still, a Muddle of a Mess

June 5, 2013
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By Lillie Anne Brown Ok, let me just start by acknowledging what I get: I get that Tyler Perry provides excellent employment opportunities for people of color at his Atlanta-based studio. I get that he is a spiritual person and understands from where his blessings come. I get that he says he doesn’t care what...
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Posted in Black Women, Culture, Entertainment, Family | 24 Comments »

The Rise of Beyoncé, The Fall of Lauryn Hill: A Tale of Two Icons

May 13, 2013
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By Janell Hobson Fifteen years ago, the stardom of then-23-year-old Lauryn Hill had peaked when she released what would become her defining musical legacy.  After rising to popularity as part of the hip-hop trio The Fugees, with fellow members Wyclef Jean and Pras, she later released her solo album, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill,...
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Posted in Black Women, Culture, Entertainment | 176 Comments »

Why I Haven't Given Up on Hip-Hop

April 19, 2013
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By Amber Jones When did you first fall in love with hip-hop? This question frames one of my favorite films, Brown Sugar (2002). The film explores the relationship between two childhood friends, Sidney Shaw (Sanaa Lathan) and Dre Ellis (Taye Diggs), through the progression of hip-hop — best chronicled in the classic track “I...
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Posted in College Feminisms, Culture, Entertainment | 28 Comments »

Untangling the Knots: Understanding the Hair Politics of Black Women (Revisited)

April 9, 2013
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Untangling the Knots: Understanding the Hair Politics of Black Women (Revisited)

By Mazuba Haanyama My central aim involves the politics of bodily performance, in negotiation with shifting realities of a post-Apartheid context, where constructions of gender, race and class are both mobile and stagnant… This project critically engages the role of popular culture in influencing youth cultures. In a context such as South Africa, such...
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Posted in Black Women, Culture, Entertainment, Style, Women of Color, World | 16 Comments »

Feminists We Love: Joan Morgan (Video)

March 22, 2013
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Joan Morgan is an award-winning journalist, author and a provocative cultural critic. A pioneering hip-hop journalist, she began her professional writing career freelancing for The Village Voice. Morgan’s passion and commitment to the accurate documentation of hip-hop culture combined with adept cultural criticism placed her at the forefront of music journalism. She was one...
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Posted in Academia, Activism, Black Women, Entertainment, Feminism, Feminists We Love, Style, Television, Writing | 8 Comments »

Confessions of a Black Morrissey Fan

March 21, 2013
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Confessions of a Black Morrissey Fan

By Joshua Alston This week, Morrissey announced that he is canceling the remainder of his North American tour, due to an ongoing battle with a bleeding ulcer, Barrett’s esophagus, and a case of pneumonia in both of his lungs. I was disappointed to hear about the illnesses plaguing the singer, who since fronting the seminal...
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Posted in Culture, Entertainment, Music | 40 Comments »

Taunts, Tweets, and Black Girl Genius

March 6, 2013
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Taunts, Tweets, and Black Girl Genius

By Salamishah Tillet “Baby girl genius,” is what I muttered when I saw Quvenzhané Wallis shine bright on the television screen last Oscar Sunday night. Beaming in midnight blue and flexing her bity arms, she was a sight never seen at the Academy Awards before.  It was not simply because at nine-years-old, she was the...
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Posted in Black Women, Entertainment, Television, Violence, Youth | 28 Comments »

On Beyoncé, Benedict, and the Volition of Women

March 1, 2013
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By Lisa O’Neill At a school mass at my all girls’ Catholic High School, the priest said a homily about chastity, and in particular, sex before marriage. “Let’s say you are about to get married and you are going give your husband a gift, the gift of yourself and your sexuality,” he said. I...
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Posted in Culture, Entertainment, Music, Politics, Religion, U.S., World, Youth | 8 Comments »

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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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