Author Archive

Love Note to Toni

November 28, 2014
By
Photograph-of-Dr.-Beverly-Guy-Sheftall-300x225

Beverly Guy-Sheftall: So, five years after you joined the ancestors, the Women’s Center calls your name and honors your work. We celebrate with your friends, comrades, students, community organizers, professors, filmmakers, writers, agitators, and your daughter, Karma Bene Bambara Smith, and her growing family. We are deeply indebted to Karma for the precious gift...
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Posted in Black Women, Feminism, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 1 Comment »

Toni Cade Bambara: ‘…an uptown Griot’

November 28, 2014
By
Clarke IX

Cheryl Clarke: The Black Woman: An Anthology from 1970, which Toni edited...is still one of the books I live by. Really, until Barbara Smith and Lorraine Bethel edited Conditions: Five, the Black Women's Issue in 1979, The Black Woman and Gerda Lerner's Black Women in White America were really the only two works that...
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Posted in Black Women, Feminism, LGBTQI, Toni Cade Bambara | 1 Comment »

Liberation Legacy: Fifteen Years of the Toni Cade Bambara Scholar-Activism Program and Conferences at Spelman College, 2000-2015

November 28, 2014
By
Toni Cade Bambara Scholar-Activism Conference
courtesy: ©Malika Redmond

M. Bahati Kuumba and Malika Redmond: The Toni Cade Bambara Scholar-Activism Conference happens in March during Women’s History Month on or near Bambara’s birthday. It is both a celebration of her audacious body of work on behalf of Black people and gives students the opportunity to set the conference agenda, take charge of...
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Posted in Academia, Activism, Black life matters, Black Women, Education, Feminism, LGBTQI, Politics, Sexuality, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 3 Comments »

How Toni Cade Bambara Saved Me

November 28, 2014
By
Photo Credit: Petra Richterova

Imani Uzuri: I spent many stolen hours crying in a quiet gazebo meditating on the wide sky and trying to understand who I was becoming, trying to understand how I was changing. The questions cascaded over me, Who are you? Do you want to be whole? Are you willing to be broken apart, separated...
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Posted in Academia, Black Women, Feminism, Personal is Political., Sexuality, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 3 Comments »

Wholeness, Homeness: A Love Note to Toni

November 28, 2014
By
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Rita Dove: So my first meeting with Toni occurred under the glare of bright lights; and though I don’t recall what words were exchanged—the welcoming applause drowned out all dialogue, anyway—what I do remember, as I found myself immediately enveloped in her warm embrace, is thinking: “Yes, I am home, truly home.”
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Posted in Black Women, Personal is Political., Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 3 Comments »

Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara

November 27, 2014
By
Sanchez

Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be...
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Ethnicity, Feminism, Patriarchy, Poetry, Racism, Sexism, Toni Cade Bambara, White Supremacy | 2 Comments »

Toni Cade Bambara: The Moment In-Between

November 27, 2014
By
Traylor headshot

Eleanor Traylor: Since then, we became communicants like those described in “the Johnson Girls” in Gorilla. And our talk, like those girls, was self-fashioning talk. Yes, we were hip as the “fly” hats and dresses that Paula Baldwin Whaley made.
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Posted in Academia, Black Women, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 1 Comment »

Bambara: What She Meant To Us/Me

November 27, 2014
By
Picture1

There is brilliance and bravery written here, among the cultures of masculinity and “men run it.” There is a clear message here for the youthful years and innocent eyes of “I’ll make us a world” students. Toni Cade Bambara, in her critical, original and singular anthology The Black Woman (1970), opened the door for...
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Posted in Black Men, Black Women, Culture, Feminism, Fiction, Patriarchy, Politics, Racism, Sexism, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 2 Comments »

And The Beat Goes On: Toni Cade Bambara

November 27, 2014
By
Dr. Gloria I. Joseph
©Susan J Ross

Dr. Gloria I. Joseph: Toni Cade Bambara’s talents and intellect were indeed, outstanding. Her range of knowledge was extensive as was repeatedly demonstrated during conversations and through her writings. The fact that this “knowledgeable information” flowed so easily from Toni and the manner in which she seemingly automatically, reached conclusions and swiftly got to...
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Posted in Activism, Black Women, Racism, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 1 Comment »

The Seabirds Don’t Lie

November 26, 2014
By
LauraBrooklyn

Laura Whitehorn: Rubbish, really, and you showed me so later, narrating the tale of similar idiocies from liberals visiting a Black southern community, romanticizing what they saw and in so doing, insulting the intelligence and discounting the creativity of the community they were visiting. Be honest, you said, without exactly saying it, solidarity can’t...
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Posted in Activism, Black Women, History, Militarization, Military, Politics, Racism, Toni Cade Bambara, U.S., Violence, White Supremacy, Women of Color, World | 5 Comments »

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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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