In the Aftermath of the Trial

July 22, 2013
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In the wake of the George Zimmerman trial, The Feminist Wire hosted a weeklong forum featuring a variety of essays and perspectives. We felt it imperative to address not only the injustice of the “not guilty” verdict, but the racism that pervaded every aspect of the case, from Trayvon Martin’s murder to the trial’s aftermath to the media coverage. Below is a complete listing of all the essays featured in our forum, with hyperlinks.

Obviously, although the TFW forum has now concluded, the conversation is far from over. The trial and the nation’s deeply conflicted feelings about it underscore the great, seemingly unbridgeable distance between our (white supremacist) fantasy of a “post-racial” America and our very painful reality, or rather differential lived realities. Thus, our work continues.

An Open Love Note to My Son: On Mourning, Love, and Black Motherhood,” by Christen Smith

White Female Jurors and Florida Justice,” by Zillah Eisenstein

No Justice for Trayvon: White Women in the Jury Box,” by Monica J. Casper

’We’re’ Not Raising Trayvon: The Difference Whiteness Makes,” by Heather Laine Talley

A Statement on the Reclamation of All Black Life: For Trayvon, Marissa, & Jordan,” by Brothers Writing Collective

Trayvon’s Class of 2013,” by Sikivu Hutchinson

Trayvon and George: Why This Case Is Really About Women,” by Kelly Macías

Racial Cowardice, White Denial: Post Racial Delusions in the Era of Zimmerman,” by David J. Leonard

To Sustain and Nourish Us as We Work for Justice,” by Chris Crass

White Feminists and Trayvon Martin,” by Deborah Guckenheimer

Carrying Trayvon’s Body: What Is To Be Done?” by Shana Redmond

But What About the Children?” by Hope Wabuke

Race Baiting? Our System Has Failed,” by Alice Hunt

Wall of Shame: Racists,” by The Feminist Wire

The Burdens of Blackness,” by Tikia K. Hamilton

Instant Messages: On White Womanhood, Fear of Black Men, and Changing Our Minds,” by Abe Louise Young

Am I a Race Traitor? Trayvon Martin, Gender Talk, and Invisible Black Women,” by j.n. salters

The ‘Unsophisticated’ Mirror of Rachel Jeantel,” by Lauren G. Parker

 

 

 

 

 

 

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