Arts & Culture

The Feminist Wire is proud to publish outstanding works by established and emerging artists in our Arts & Culture section. We feature poetry, fiction, memoir, and drama, as well as visual art, film, design, and works that cross generic boundaries. Our Arts & Culture section showcases the works of artists at all stages in their artistic lives. Our “Spotlight” series features innovative work by celebrated writers, poets, and artists; our “Suites” series collects the works of several emerging artists thinking through similar themes. We also publish in several other formats, including genre-bending forms like the lyric essay, and short poems or flash fiction pieces on compelling feminist themes. We invite you to take a look, and submit your work!

Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara

November 27, 2014
By
Sanchez

Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be...
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Ethnicity, Feminism, Patriarchy, Poetry, Racism, Sexism, Toni Cade Bambara, White Supremacy | 2 Comments »

Hunger

November 26, 2014
By
Kwame Laughing Foto

They say you had the eye; they say you saw into people. They say you came before as shaman or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister feeling for a lonely brother with no language to lament, and you gave me more days, and more days. Yes, they could...
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Poetry, Toni Cade Bambara | 1 Comment »

Stroller (A Screenplay)

November 24, 2014
By
Black families and community

Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Family, Racism, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 2 Comments »

I’ve Got Something To Say About This: A Survival Incantation

November 21, 2014
By
Kate Rushin
credit/copyright: Rachel Eliza Griffiths

Kate Rushin: I see the whole thing played out. I'm bludgeoned, bloody, raped. My story is reduced to filler buried in the back of the paper, on page 49, and I say, "No. No way."
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Poetry, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 1 Comment »

what is left

November 21, 2014
By
M. Nzadi Keita
photograph: ©Elizabeth Ho

M. Nzadi Keita: what you remember/ starts with a smile/ a raw edge/ a single snip/ from the someone dead
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Love, Poetry, Toni Cade Bambara | Comments Off

Praise to the Writer

November 21, 2014
By
Toni Cade Bambara,
Southern Collective of African American Writers (SCAAW), 1988
©Susan J. Ross

Alice Lovelace: Toni Cade made an art of living/ Toni stood and we were lifted
Toni spoke and our lives were saved/ Toni listened and we were validated/ She is the breast that fed our union/ Hers' was the womb of our nourishment.
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Poetry, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 2 Comments »

A State of Rage (for Toni Cade Bambara)

November 19, 2014
By
"A State of Rage" -Jacquelin Thompson, Lois Moses, Bridget Jones
Photographer: Wadia L. Gardiner
Courtesy: AfroLez® Productions

I am tired of the silences that have been imposed on us. Shhhhh. Black women and girls. I am tired of the silences that we, Black women, have imposed on ourselves and on our daughters.
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Girls, Black Men, Black Women, Bodies, Ethnicity, Feminism, intersectionality, masculinity, Men of Color, Patriarchy, Poetry, Racism, Sexism, sexual violence, Sexuality, Toni Cade Bambara, Violence, White Supremacy, Women of Color | 4 Comments »

a spell to save your life

November 19, 2014
By
"Exhale" collage ©Alexis Pauline Gumbs
Photograph of Toni Cade Bambara ©Susan Ross

Alexis Pauline Gumbs: eat salt not that ocean drowning snack to stop thinking about dying unintentional salt
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Are we ready to be well?

November 19, 2014
By
The Salt Eaters (new)

Cara Page: She asks us to be well/ to love ourselves and one another/ So that we are all safe and loved.
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Men, Black Women, Patriarchy, Poetry, Racism, Sexism, Toni Cade Bambara, Violence, White Supremacy, Writing | 3 Comments »

Photographs of Toni Cade Bambara & Friends

November 17, 2014
By
"Sistren: Black Women Writers at the Inauguration of Sister President Johnnetta B. Cole" which I took in 1988. 
Top Row: Louise Meriwether, Pinkie Gordon Lane, Johnnetta Cole and Paula Giddings. Middle Row: Pearl Cleage, Gwendolyn Brooks and Toni Cade Bambara. Bottom Row: Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni and Mari Evans
photo credit: Susan J. Ross. ©1988

Photo griot Susan J. Ross shares photographs of Toni Cade Bambara and her friends during this forum celebration.
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Men, Black Women, Culture, media, Toni Cade Bambara | 2 Comments »

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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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