Arts & Culture

The Feminist Wire is proud to publish outstanding works by established and emerging artists in our Arts & Culture section. We feature poetry, fiction, memoir, and drama, as well as visual art, film, design, and works that cross generic boundaries. Our Arts & Culture section showcases the works of artists at all stages in their artistic lives. Our “Spotlight” series features innovative work by celebrated writers, poets, and artists; our “Suites” series collects the works of several emerging artists thinking through similar themes. We also publish in several other formats, including genre-bending forms like the lyric essay, and short poems or flash fiction pieces on compelling feminist themes. We invite you to take a look, and submit your work!

Hunger

November 26, 2014
By
Kwame Laughing Foto

They say you had the eye; they say you saw into people. They say you came before as shaman or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister feeling for a lonely brother with no language to lament, and you gave me more days, and more days. Yes, they could...
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Stroller (A Screenplay)

November 24, 2014
By
Black families and community

Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Family, Racism, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | No Comments »

I’ve Got Something To Say About This: A Survival Incantation

November 21, 2014
By
Kate Rushin
credit/copyright: Rachel Eliza Griffiths

Kate Rushin: I see the whole thing played out. I'm bludgeoned, bloody, raped. My story is reduced to filler buried in the back of the paper, on page 49, and I say, "No. No way."
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what is left

November 21, 2014
By
M. Nzadi Keita
photograph: ©Elizabeth Ho

M. Nzadi Keita: what you remember/ starts with a smile/ a raw edge/ a single snip/ from the someone dead
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Praise to the Writer

November 21, 2014
By
Toni Cade Bambara,
Southern Collective of African American Writers (SCAAW), 1988
©Susan J. Ross

Alice Lovelace: Toni Cade made an art of living/ Toni stood and we were lifted
Toni spoke and our lives were saved/ Toni listened and we were validated/ She is the breast that fed our union/ Hers' was the womb of our nourishment.
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Poetry, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 1 Comment »

A State of Rage (for Toni Cade Bambara)

November 19, 2014
By
"A State of Rage" -Jacquelin Thompson, Lois Moses, Bridget Jones
Photographer: Wadia L. Gardiner
Courtesy: AfroLez® Productions

I am tired of the silences that have been imposed on us. Shhhhh. Black women and girls. I am tired of the silences that we, Black women, have imposed on ourselves and on our daughters.
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Girls, Black Men, Black Women, Bodies, Ethnicity, Feminism, intersectionality, masculinity, Men of Color, Patriarchy, Poetry, Racism, Sexism, sexual violence, Sexuality, Toni Cade Bambara, Violence, White Supremacy, Women of Color | 3 Comments »

a spell to save your life

November 19, 2014
By
"Exhale" collage ©Alexis Pauline Gumbs
Photograph of Toni Cade Bambara ©Susan Ross

Alexis Pauline Gumbs: eat salt not that ocean drowning snack to stop thinking about dying unintentional salt
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Are we ready to be well?

November 19, 2014
By
The Salt Eaters (new)

Cara Page: She asks us to be well/ to love ourselves and one another/ So that we are all safe and loved.
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Men, Black Women, Patriarchy, Poetry, Racism, Sexism, Toni Cade Bambara, Violence, White Supremacy, Writing | 2 Comments »

Photographs of Toni Cade Bambara & Friends

November 17, 2014
By
"Sistren: Black Women Writers at the Inauguration of Sister President Johnnetta B. Cole" which I took in 1988. 
Top Row: Louise Meriwether, Pinkie Gordon Lane, Johnnetta Cole and Paula Giddings. Middle Row: Pearl Cleage, Gwendolyn Brooks and Toni Cade Bambara. Bottom Row: Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni and Mari Evans
photo credit: Susan J. Ross. ©1988

Photo griot Susan J. Ross shares photographs of Toni Cade Bambara and her friends during this forum celebration.
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Re-Membering Audre Lorde and Celebrating Toni Cade Bambara

November 17, 2014
By
Audre Lorde

Aishah Shahidah Simmons: Was it coincidence or karmic symmetry that the first day of our celebration in honor of Bambara falls on the twenty-second anniversary on Lorde’s transcendence into the ancestral world? We do not know. What we know is that our sister ancestral spirits are communing with us
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Posted in Activism, Arts & Culture, Audre Lorde, Black Girls, Black Women, Feminism, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 3 Comments »

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Arts & Culture

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

  • I’ve Got Something To Say About This: A Survival Incantation Kate Rushin
credit/copyright: Rachel Eliza Griffiths

    Kate Rushin: I see the whole thing played out. I’m bludgeoned, bloody, raped. My story is reduced to filler buried in the back of the paper, on page 49, and I say, “No. No way.”

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