3 Reasons Why You Should Be Paying Attention to Moral Mondays in North Carolina

July 10, 2013
By

Grotesque” is the word the New York Times used in an editorial today to describe North Carolina politics. I can think of some others.

In many ways, what’s happening in North Carolina is not entirely different from what is happening in places all over the country. In North Carolina as in other places, legislators are investing immense time and resources on abortion policy that intervenes in “problems” that are political phantasms, while their constituents are navigating fundamental problems like hunger and access to basic health care. Education is being gutted in many states. And in what appears to be a desperate attempt to hold onto power, the Right is relying on some tried and true strategies that have the effect of un-democratizing democracy by limiting public protest and constraining political participation (through voter ID laws and a tax on parents’ of college students who register in college towns). (In North Carolina too, moneyed interests are at work buttressing policymakers’ efforts by labeling some forms of citizenship as, perhaps, too citizen-y.)

But what’s happening in North Carolina is unique too. One of the most prized public higher education systems in the country is undergoing slash and burn style cuts that threaten its longstanding status as truly exemplary. North Carolina is the first state to eliminate federal unemployment benefits. The Racial Justice Act, a groundbreaking piece of legislation, has also been repealed too. Let’s review: Educational opportunity is steadily disintegrating, at the same time that social support systems have been dismantled. Oh, and “we’ve” also taken on a “Who cares?” attitude toward the fact that the death penalty disproportionately kills more Blacks than whites due to sustained racial bias.

I could go on.

From www.newsobserver.com

From www.newsobserver.com

But in North Carolina, weekly Moral Monday protests have been growing since April. Reverend Doctor William Barber, the state’s NAACP President, has spearheaded and sustained civil disobedience that has called out thousands of protesters and led to hundreds of arrests. The sheer mobilization of people achieved by Moral Mondays is incredible and inspiring. But what’s happening in North Carolina is worth paying attention to for three additional reasons.

1.News coverage has incorrectly reported that this past Mondays’ protest revolved around the North Carolina General Assembly’s recent abortion related efforts. The policy aims is to reduce access to one clinic in a state with a highway that stretches 604 miles from border to border. Surely, many protestors cared about reproductive justice, a site of struggle in which abortion is only one facet. But protestors were there to speak up about higher education, gerrymandering, the racism deeply structuring the criminal justice system, unemployment benefits, policy that directly attacks the lives of people with disabilities, the sustained exclusion of LGBTQ North Carolinians from any state recognition, pay increases for the NC Cabinet, and privatization of city and county resources. (It’s always worth considering when and under what circumstances “big government” is demonized and when it is strategically deployed.)

I know the range of issues protestors were fighting against because I was there. The conversations that happened on the bus ride from Asheville, North Carolina to Raleigh were wide ranging as people articulated how voting rights, redistricting, and abortion policy are connected to environmental sustainability, family wellbeing, and racism. Participants whose political engagement tends towards a single issue (or maybe two) are articulating a seemingly newfound understanding of the importance of coalition building. Moral Mondays represent a significant moment in contemporary political struggle wherein single-issue politics are giving way to a deep understanding of the interconnectedness of social issues.

From www.dailykos.com

From www.dailykos.com

2. On Moral Monday, protestors moved from the lawn outside the Legislative Building into the rotunda that bridges the House and Senate chambers. Police gave protestors a five-minute warning to vacate the premises. A select group stayed and was subsequently arrested. I was not a part of that group. As I made way toward the exit at the two-minute warning, I passed an Ob-Gyn entering the rotunda, the area in which arrests would promptly begin. I knew she was an Ob-Gyn because she was wearing her white doctors’ coat embroidered with her name and professional affiliation. I do not know if she was arrested. But her visibility at Moral Mondays demonstrates something significant.

Public employees in North Carolina and in other states face limits on political engagement. For example, there are rules for university faculty about using official email to raise campaign funds or running for public office while maintaining a university appointment. Reminders about these limits produce, perhaps unintentionally, an ambient fear about political participation. The effect is disengagement. By wearing her physician’s jacket, the woman I saw was protesting not as a “Democrat” or a liberal, a progressive or a radical, but first and foremost as a doctor.

Doctors are charged with patient care, and when polices impede their ability to meet professional obligations, contesting these policies is not simply a political intervention but rather a professional one. As a professor (and a UNC system alum), I am watching changes unfold at a very real cost to the students I am charged with teaching and mentoring. My duties involve skill building and advising towards graduation, but cuts that decrease faculty-to-student ratio and increase tuition costs undermine these basic professional responsibilities. Moral Mondays are shifting the profile of protest. While fears of being branded a “radical” have cultivated a culture of apathy, protestors are dispensing with ideological discourse to demonstrate the ways in which public policy is an affront to the professional obligations tied to many forms of public employment.

3. Recent Supreme Court decisions make one fact abundantly clear: Region matters. The rights and protections afforded to United States citizens vary, sometimes drastically, by place. The DOMA ruling transformed everyday life for some LGBTQ people. But for those living in states with Constitutional bans on marriage and limits to equal protection, life remains largely unchanged. So, too, the verdict on the Voting Rights Act reminds us (and also disregards the fact) that U.S. history does not evenly impact contemporary life state by state. The legacy of Jim Crow is alive and well in the South—where disproportionate incarceration by race and a massive rate of (white) private schooling reproduce racial inequalities in economics and health in ways shockingly unchanged from a century ago.

At the same time that North Carolina is cutting higher education, Oregon announced a plan to make college tuition free. At the same time that the North Carolina General Assembly destabilized life for the unemployed, the Vermont legislature was broadening eligibility for free lunch, providing augmented heating subsidies to poor Vermonters, and increasing the funding for state mental health facilities. Moral Mondays are a vivid reminder that “progress” is distributed unevenly and that it is critically important to focus on region as a vector of inequality and oppression. We need allies from states where flourishing is happening to help us combat the rampant destruction to the great state of North Carolina.

From www.allposters.com

From www.allposters.com

On Monday afternoon, the walls of the Legislative Building reverberated. “This is our house. This is the people’s house,” we chanted over and over again. North Carolina is reminding us of what happens when good people stop paying attention, and Moral Mondays are reviving a collective memory about what real democracy depends upon.   

Tags: , , , , , ,

80 Responses to 3 Reasons Why You Should Be Paying Attention to Moral Mondays in North Carolina

  1. Angel Swanson on July 11, 2013 at 10:45 am

    I wish authors of these pieces would give us concrete ways to assist. I live in Washington and don’t have the money to fly out to demonstrate. Signing petitions is the only option I have been presented with to help. I’m sure we can do more. Please tell us how to help you!

    • Iris Carter on July 11, 2013 at 3:27 pm

      I have been to one of the Moral Monday protests and will try to attend another. While there may be other ways to help, I can suggests a few. Any time you see negative posts, let people know that our legislature and governor were elected by a narrow majority. They do NOT represent all North Carolinians. Also, they were elected on false pretenses and a majority of those that voted for them are wishing they hadn’t. We are a progressive southern state – not a bunch of uneducated hicks.
      Secondly, let the NCGA know you are watching – call or email them. No, you are not a resident, but you are appalled by the injustice.
      Thirdly, share your opinion with your local media and international media.
      Fourthly, follow the Coffee Party – Annabelle Park and Eric Byler are documenting the events in NC and are phenomenal at getting to the crux of human rights and government injustice.
      The more people talk and share, and are educated about wrong-doing, the less our government representatives on all levels can hide.

    • Parkwood1920 on July 11, 2013 at 3:33 pm

      Angel—North Carolinians don’t need your help to protest our government, as you can see from the photo. What we need is for everyone to challenge right-wing attacks on poor and oppressed people in the communities where they live. That’s the point of this essay.

      • Jo on July 12, 2013 at 12:10 pm

        Parkwood1020, I respectfully disagree. NC needs all the help it can get. Why are you pushing people away when we WANT the rest of the country to watch and help?

        • Barbara Dantonio on July 12, 2013 at 5:01 pm

          I agree, we need all the help we can muster. Verbal, financially, emotionally. It is wrong and we are going to keep protesting. This has got to stop and we need all the awareness that we can get.

    • julie on July 11, 2013 at 4:46 pm

      Angel, ways to assist:
      Write your national legislators about the national issues so that we can focus on our local problems and worry less about the national ones.

      If you know people living in NC, check with them whether they’re registered. Call them up and chat with them about the issues. Remind them to vote on election day.

      Moral Mondays are a great and worthy cause (I’ve been to several), but they’re not going to sway the NCGA. They have an agenda and they’re going to stick to it. The only chance we have is to vote the suckers out in 2014, and we need every sympathetic person in NC registered and voting.

    • Carolyn Billings on July 11, 2013 at 10:16 pm

      You can spread the word among your own contacts. The more people who are dismayed by the unreasoned activity of our NC elected officials, the more it hits the national news, the more embarrassed our Legislators may become.
      And you can join or send a contribution to the North Carolina NAACP to help with the costs of the actual protests which requires staff to help the arrestees when they are released and transportation to return them to where cars are located, forms and handouts at the pre-rally preparation, etc.
      if you are a member of a like-minded group you can encourage meaningful conversation around the issues cropping up in other states as well as North Carolina.
      Finally, send a note blessing to Reverend Barber to offer your support and approval of his hard work and amazing leadership to lead a group of thousands in PEACEFUL civil disobedience!

    • Trish Ciaffone on July 12, 2013 at 4:06 pm

      Something I noticed concerning the NY Times piece on what these hobgoblins are doing is the reaction from McCrory and a couple of other tealiban fanatics. They seemed to have their pride bruised. I get the feeling that emails, tweets and phone calls will hit a nerve. Specifically if you question their intelligence and/or sanity. McCrory did not like being insulted. So please,insult him. Laugh at him, mock him, call him an idiot. He may not care what the agenda of the tealiban is doing to NC, but his pride and his ego are another thing entirely.

  2. Angel Swanson on July 11, 2013 at 10:45 am

    I wish authors of these pieces would give us concrete ways to assist. I live in Washington and don’t have the money to fly out to demonstrate. Signing petitions is the only option I have been presented with to help. I’m sure we can do more. Please tell us how to help you!

    • Iris Carter on July 11, 2013 at 3:27 pm

      I have been to one of the Moral Monday protests and will try to attend another. While there may be other ways to help, I can suggests a few. Any time you see negative posts, let people know that our legislature and governor were elected by a narrow majority. They do NOT represent all North Carolinians. Also, they were elected on false pretenses and a majority of those that voted for them are wishing they hadn’t. We are a progressive southern state – not a bunch of uneducated hicks.
      Secondly, let the NCGA know you are watching – call or email them. No, you are not a resident, but you are appalled by the injustice.
      Thirdly, share your opinion with your local media and international media.
      Fourthly, follow the Coffee Party – Annabelle Park and Eric Byler are documenting the events in NC and are phenomenal at getting to the crux of human rights and government injustice.
      The more people talk and share, and are educated about wrong-doing, the less our government representatives on all levels can hide.

    • Parkwood1920 on July 11, 2013 at 3:33 pm

      Angel—North Carolinians don’t need your help to protest our government, as you can see from the photo. What we need is for everyone to challenge right-wing attacks on poor and oppressed people in the communities where they live. That’s the point of this essay.

      • Jo on July 12, 2013 at 12:10 pm

        Parkwood1020, I respectfully disagree. NC needs all the help it can get. Why are you pushing people away when we WANT the rest of the country to watch and help?

        • Barbara Dantonio on July 12, 2013 at 5:01 pm

          I agree, we need all the help we can muster. Verbal, financially, emotionally. It is wrong and we are going to keep protesting. This has got to stop and we need all the awareness that we can get.

    • julie on July 11, 2013 at 4:46 pm

      Angel, ways to assist:
      Write your national legislators about the national issues so that we can focus on our local problems and worry less about the national ones.

      If you know people living in NC, check with them whether they’re registered. Call them up and chat with them about the issues. Remind them to vote on election day.

      Moral Mondays are a great and worthy cause (I’ve been to several), but they’re not going to sway the NCGA. They have an agenda and they’re going to stick to it. The only chance we have is to vote the suckers out in 2014, and we need every sympathetic person in NC registered and voting.

    • Carolyn Billings on July 11, 2013 at 10:16 pm

      You can spread the word among your own contacts. The more people who are dismayed by the unreasoned activity of our NC elected officials, the more it hits the national news, the more embarrassed our Legislators may become.
      And you can join or send a contribution to the North Carolina NAACP to help with the costs of the actual protests which requires staff to help the arrestees when they are released and transportation to return them to where cars are located, forms and handouts at the pre-rally preparation, etc.
      if you are a member of a like-minded group you can encourage meaningful conversation around the issues cropping up in other states as well as North Carolina.
      Finally, send a note blessing to Reverend Barber to offer your support and approval of his hard work and amazing leadership to lead a group of thousands in PEACEFUL civil disobedience!

    • Trish Ciaffone on July 12, 2013 at 4:06 pm

      Something I noticed concerning the NY Times piece on what these hobgoblins are doing is the reaction from McCrory and a couple of other tealiban fanatics. They seemed to have their pride bruised. I get the feeling that emails, tweets and phone calls will hit a nerve. Specifically if you question their intelligence and/or sanity. McCrory did not like being insulted. So please,insult him. Laugh at him, mock him, call him an idiot. He may not care what the agenda of the tealiban is doing to NC, but his pride and his ego are another thing entirely.

  3. Angel Swanson on July 11, 2013 at 10:45 am

    I wish authors of these pieces would give us concrete ways to assist. I live in Washington and don’t have the money to fly out to demonstrate. Signing petitions is the only option I have been presented with to help. I’m sure we can do more. Please tell us how to help you!

    • Iris Carter on July 11, 2013 at 3:27 pm

      I have been to one of the Moral Monday protests and will try to attend another. While there may be other ways to help, I can suggests a few. Any time you see negative posts, let people know that our legislature and governor were elected by a narrow majority. They do NOT represent all North Carolinians. Also, they were elected on false pretenses and a majority of those that voted for them are wishing they hadn’t. We are a progressive southern state – not a bunch of uneducated hicks.
      Secondly, let the NCGA know you are watching – call or email them. No, you are not a resident, but you are appalled by the injustice.
      Thirdly, share your opinion with your local media and international media.
      Fourthly, follow the Coffee Party – Annabelle Park and Eric Byler are documenting the events in NC and are phenomenal at getting to the crux of human rights and government injustice.
      The more people talk and share, and are educated about wrong-doing, the less our government representatives on all levels can hide.

    • Parkwood1920 on July 11, 2013 at 3:33 pm

      Angel—North Carolinians don’t need your help to protest our government, as you can see from the photo. What we need is for everyone to challenge right-wing attacks on poor and oppressed people in the communities where they live. That’s the point of this essay.

      • Jo on July 12, 2013 at 12:10 pm

        Parkwood1020, I respectfully disagree. NC needs all the help it can get. Why are you pushing people away when we WANT the rest of the country to watch and help?

        • Barbara Dantonio on July 12, 2013 at 5:01 pm

          I agree, we need all the help we can muster. Verbal, financially, emotionally. It is wrong and we are going to keep protesting. This has got to stop and we need all the awareness that we can get.

    • julie on July 11, 2013 at 4:46 pm

      Angel, ways to assist:
      Write your national legislators about the national issues so that we can focus on our local problems and worry less about the national ones.

      If you know people living in NC, check with them whether they’re registered. Call them up and chat with them about the issues. Remind them to vote on election day.

      Moral Mondays are a great and worthy cause (I’ve been to several), but they’re not going to sway the NCGA. They have an agenda and they’re going to stick to it. The only chance we have is to vote the suckers out in 2014, and we need every sympathetic person in NC registered and voting.

    • Carolyn Billings on July 11, 2013 at 10:16 pm

      You can spread the word among your own contacts. The more people who are dismayed by the unreasoned activity of our NC elected officials, the more it hits the national news, the more embarrassed our Legislators may become.
      And you can join or send a contribution to the North Carolina NAACP to help with the costs of the actual protests which requires staff to help the arrestees when they are released and transportation to return them to where cars are located, forms and handouts at the pre-rally preparation, etc.
      if you are a member of a like-minded group you can encourage meaningful conversation around the issues cropping up in other states as well as North Carolina.
      Finally, send a note blessing to Reverend Barber to offer your support and approval of his hard work and amazing leadership to lead a group of thousands in PEACEFUL civil disobedience!

    • Trish Ciaffone on July 12, 2013 at 4:06 pm

      Something I noticed concerning the NY Times piece on what these hobgoblins are doing is the reaction from McCrory and a couple of other tealiban fanatics. They seemed to have their pride bruised. I get the feeling that emails, tweets and phone calls will hit a nerve. Specifically if you question their intelligence and/or sanity. McCrory did not like being insulted. So please,insult him. Laugh at him, mock him, call him an idiot. He may not care what the agenda of the tealiban is doing to NC, but his pride and his ego are another thing entirely.

  4. Angel Swanson on July 11, 2013 at 10:45 am

    I wish authors of these pieces would give us concrete ways to assist. I live in Washington and don’t have the money to fly out to demonstrate. Signing petitions is the only option I have been presented with to help. I’m sure we can do more. Please tell us how to help you!

    • Iris Carter on July 11, 2013 at 3:27 pm

      I have been to one of the Moral Monday protests and will try to attend another. While there may be other ways to help, I can suggests a few. Any time you see negative posts, let people know that our legislature and governor were elected by a narrow majority. They do NOT represent all North Carolinians. Also, they were elected on false pretenses and a majority of those that voted for them are wishing they hadn’t. We are a progressive southern state – not a bunch of uneducated hicks.
      Secondly, let the NCGA know you are watching – call or email them. No, you are not a resident, but you are appalled by the injustice.
      Thirdly, share your opinion with your local media and international media.
      Fourthly, follow the Coffee Party – Annabelle Park and Eric Byler are documenting the events in NC and are phenomenal at getting to the crux of human rights and government injustice.
      The more people talk and share, and are educated about wrong-doing, the less our government representatives on all levels can hide.

    • Parkwood1920 on July 11, 2013 at 3:33 pm

      Angel—North Carolinians don’t need your help to protest our government, as you can see from the photo. What we need is for everyone to challenge right-wing attacks on poor and oppressed people in the communities where they live. That’s the point of this essay.

      • Jo on July 12, 2013 at 12:10 pm

        Parkwood1020, I respectfully disagree. NC needs all the help it can get. Why are you pushing people away when we WANT the rest of the country to watch and help?

        • Barbara Dantonio on July 12, 2013 at 5:01 pm

          I agree, we need all the help we can muster. Verbal, financially, emotionally. It is wrong and we are going to keep protesting. This has got to stop and we need all the awareness that we can get.

    • julie on July 11, 2013 at 4:46 pm

      Angel, ways to assist:
      Write your national legislators about the national issues so that we can focus on our local problems and worry less about the national ones.

      If you know people living in NC, check with them whether they’re registered. Call them up and chat with them about the issues. Remind them to vote on election day.

      Moral Mondays are a great and worthy cause (I’ve been to several), but they’re not going to sway the NCGA. They have an agenda and they’re going to stick to it. The only chance we have is to vote the suckers out in 2014, and we need every sympathetic person in NC registered and voting.

    • Carolyn Billings on July 11, 2013 at 10:16 pm

      You can spread the word among your own contacts. The more people who are dismayed by the unreasoned activity of our NC elected officials, the more it hits the national news, the more embarrassed our Legislators may become.
      And you can join or send a contribution to the North Carolina NAACP to help with the costs of the actual protests which requires staff to help the arrestees when they are released and transportation to return them to where cars are located, forms and handouts at the pre-rally preparation, etc.
      if you are a member of a like-minded group you can encourage meaningful conversation around the issues cropping up in other states as well as North Carolina.
      Finally, send a note blessing to Reverend Barber to offer your support and approval of his hard work and amazing leadership to lead a group of thousands in PEACEFUL civil disobedience!

    • Trish Ciaffone on July 12, 2013 at 4:06 pm

      Something I noticed concerning the NY Times piece on what these hobgoblins are doing is the reaction from McCrory and a couple of other tealiban fanatics. They seemed to have their pride bruised. I get the feeling that emails, tweets and phone calls will hit a nerve. Specifically if you question their intelligence and/or sanity. McCrory did not like being insulted. So please,insult him. Laugh at him, mock him, call him an idiot. He may not care what the agenda of the tealiban is doing to NC, but his pride and his ego are another thing entirely.

  5. Candy Martinez on July 11, 2013 at 11:28 am

    How can I help? I recently graduated college and am working two jobs in order to support myself. I barely have time between these two jobs, but I also want concrete information of how to show my support. I am a North Carolina citizen and I want to help change this state’s legislation for the betterment of its citizens. How is it that our government can’t see that it is leading us into a downward spiral?

  6. Candy Martinez on July 11, 2013 at 11:28 am

    How can I help? I recently graduated college and am working two jobs in order to support myself. I barely have time between these two jobs, but I also want concrete information of how to show my support. I am a North Carolina citizen and I want to help change this state’s legislation for the betterment of its citizens. How is it that our government can’t see that it is leading us into a downward spiral?

  7. Candy Martinez on July 11, 2013 at 11:28 am

    How can I help? I recently graduated college and am working two jobs in order to support myself. I barely have time between these two jobs, but I also want concrete information of how to show my support. I am a North Carolina citizen and I want to help change this state’s legislation for the betterment of its citizens. How is it that our government can’t see that it is leading us into a downward spiral?

  8. Candy Martinez on July 11, 2013 at 11:28 am

    How can I help? I recently graduated college and am working two jobs in order to support myself. I barely have time between these two jobs, but I also want concrete information of how to show my support. I am a North Carolina citizen and I want to help change this state’s legislation for the betterment of its citizens. How is it that our government can’t see that it is leading us into a downward spiral?

  9. Page McCullough on July 11, 2013 at 12:30 pm

    You can donate to the NC chapter of the NAACP at their website, if that is a possibility for you. They need money to fund their field work and even for food for people when they get out late at night at the detention center. Thanks for thinking of us. a jail bird for justice

  10. Page McCullough on July 11, 2013 at 12:30 pm

    You can donate to the NC chapter of the NAACP at their website, if that is a possibility for you. They need money to fund their field work and even for food for people when they get out late at night at the detention center. Thanks for thinking of us. a jail bird for justice

  11. Page McCullough on July 11, 2013 at 12:30 pm

    You can donate to the NC chapter of the NAACP at their website, if that is a possibility for you. They need money to fund their field work and even for food for people when they get out late at night at the detention center. Thanks for thinking of us. a jail bird for justice

  12. Page McCullough on July 11, 2013 at 12:30 pm

    You can donate to the NC chapter of the NAACP at their website, if that is a possibility for you. They need money to fund their field work and even for food for people when they get out late at night at the detention center. Thanks for thinking of us. a jail bird for justice

  13. Kansan with Deep NC Roots on July 11, 2013 at 3:23 pm

    I would love to go and help protests but I would only be seen as an “outside agitator,” despite my diploma from a UNC campus and my family ties to North Carolina that go back to the 1680′s. Yes, you saw that right. The governor, exported from Ohio, sees me as an outsider.

    He is ruining the state I love.

  14. Kansan with Deep NC Roots on July 11, 2013 at 3:23 pm

    I would love to go and help protests but I would only be seen as an “outside agitator,” despite my diploma from a UNC campus and my family ties to North Carolina that go back to the 1680′s. Yes, you saw that right. The governor, exported from Ohio, sees me as an outsider.

    He is ruining the state I love.

  15. Kansan with Deep NC Roots on July 11, 2013 at 3:23 pm

    I would love to go and help protests but I would only be seen as an “outside agitator,” despite my diploma from a UNC campus and my family ties to North Carolina that go back to the 1680′s. Yes, you saw that right. The governor, exported from Ohio, sees me as an outsider.

    He is ruining the state I love.

  16. Kansan with Deep NC Roots on July 11, 2013 at 3:23 pm

    I would love to go and help protests but I would only be seen as an “outside agitator,” despite my diploma from a UNC campus and my family ties to North Carolina that go back to the 1680′s. Yes, you saw that right. The governor, exported from Ohio, sees me as an outsider.

    He is ruining the state I love.

  17. Marylou Lamb on July 11, 2013 at 4:33 pm

    I live in California. The wrong decisions about citizens rights made federally and in states affect me too. I too am feeling helpless signing petitions and donating what little I can. We are all diminished by the big bucks controlling federal and state representatives. What can we do to be instrumental in a change?

  18. Marylou Lamb on July 11, 2013 at 4:33 pm

    I live in California. The wrong decisions about citizens rights made federally and in states affect me too. I too am feeling helpless signing petitions and donating what little I can. We are all diminished by the big bucks controlling federal and state representatives. What can we do to be instrumental in a change?

  19. Marylou Lamb on July 11, 2013 at 4:33 pm

    I live in California. The wrong decisions about citizens rights made federally and in states affect me too. I too am feeling helpless signing petitions and donating what little I can. We are all diminished by the big bucks controlling federal and state representatives. What can we do to be instrumental in a change?

  20. Marylou Lamb on July 11, 2013 at 4:33 pm

    I live in California. The wrong decisions about citizens rights made federally and in states affect me too. I too am feeling helpless signing petitions and donating what little I can. We are all diminished by the big bucks controlling federal and state representatives. What can we do to be instrumental in a change?

  21. [...] Commenter Summer sent me this great piece about Moral Monday protests in North Carolina from The Feminist Wire: [...]

  22. [...] Commenter Summer sent me this great piece about Moral Monday protests in North Carolina from The Feminist Wire: [...]

  23. [...] Commenter Summer sent me this great piece about Moral Monday protests in North Carolina from The Feminist Wire: [...]

  24. [...] Commenter Summer sent me this great piece about Moral Monday protests in North Carolina from The Feminist Wire: [...]

  25. Emily on July 12, 2013 at 8:09 am

    I’ve been to 7 of the Moral Monday protests and have witnessed their exponential growth. It has been an incredibly inspiring experience to watch and participate in a movement like this, and know that people feel as enraged as about the current legislative session as I do. I’ve also been privileged to know several people who have participated in civil disobedience and have been able to participate in it myself. The NC legislature has woken up the beast, and the next election cycle will hopefully reflect that.

  26. Emily on July 12, 2013 at 8:09 am

    I’ve been to 7 of the Moral Monday protests and have witnessed their exponential growth. It has been an incredibly inspiring experience to watch and participate in a movement like this, and know that people feel as enraged as about the current legislative session as I do. I’ve also been privileged to know several people who have participated in civil disobedience and have been able to participate in it myself. The NC legislature has woken up the beast, and the next election cycle will hopefully reflect that.

  27. Emily on July 12, 2013 at 8:09 am

    I’ve been to 7 of the Moral Monday protests and have witnessed their exponential growth. It has been an incredibly inspiring experience to watch and participate in a movement like this, and know that people feel as enraged as about the current legislative session as I do. I’ve also been privileged to know several people who have participated in civil disobedience and have been able to participate in it myself. The NC legislature has woken up the beast, and the next election cycle will hopefully reflect that.

  28. Emily on July 12, 2013 at 8:09 am

    I’ve been to 7 of the Moral Monday protests and have witnessed their exponential growth. It has been an incredibly inspiring experience to watch and participate in a movement like this, and know that people feel as enraged as about the current legislative session as I do. I’ve also been privileged to know several people who have participated in civil disobedience and have been able to participate in it myself. The NC legislature has woken up the beast, and the next election cycle will hopefully reflect that.

  29. Good News Friday | Southern Beale on July 12, 2013 at 9:49 am

    [...] • Something powerful is happening in North Carolina. The mainstream media has been ignoring this important story — protestors need to wear tricorner hats or something before they’re deemed worthy of coverage — but it’s getting harder and harder for the national media to pretend thousands of citizens aren’t taking their outrage to the streets. [...]

  30. Good News Friday | Southern Beale on July 12, 2013 at 9:49 am

    [...] • Something powerful is happening in North Carolina. The mainstream media has been ignoring this important story — protestors need to wear tricorner hats or something before they’re deemed worthy of coverage — but it’s getting harder and harder for the national media to pretend thousands of citizens aren’t taking their outrage to the streets. [...]

  31. Good News Friday | Southern Beale on July 12, 2013 at 9:49 am

    [...] • Something powerful is happening in North Carolina. The mainstream media has been ignoring this important story — protestors need to wear tricorner hats or something before they’re deemed worthy of coverage — but it’s getting harder and harder for the national media to pretend thousands of citizens aren’t taking their outrage to the streets. [...]

  32. Good News Friday | Southern Beale on July 12, 2013 at 9:49 am

    [...] • Something powerful is happening in North Carolina. The mainstream media has been ignoring this important story — protestors need to wear tricorner hats or something before they’re deemed worthy of coverage — but it’s getting harder and harder for the national media to pretend thousands of citizens aren’t taking their outrage to the streets. [...]

  33. Jo on July 12, 2013 at 12:13 pm

    Everyone, no matter where you are, if you can donate money, do it. If you can be there physically, do it. If you can volunteer for an organization, do it. Write a letter to your editor about NC or to a NC paper. There are a million ways to help. NC, Texas, WI, every state under Republican attack needs help from the entire country. If we can make the country pay attention and realize that they might be next, we can make change happen.

  34. Jo on July 12, 2013 at 12:13 pm

    Everyone, no matter where you are, if you can donate money, do it. If you can be there physically, do it. If you can volunteer for an organization, do it. Write a letter to your editor about NC or to a NC paper. There are a million ways to help. NC, Texas, WI, every state under Republican attack needs help from the entire country. If we can make the country pay attention and realize that they might be next, we can make change happen.

  35. Jo on July 12, 2013 at 12:13 pm

    Everyone, no matter where you are, if you can donate money, do it. If you can be there physically, do it. If you can volunteer for an organization, do it. Write a letter to your editor about NC or to a NC paper. There are a million ways to help. NC, Texas, WI, every state under Republican attack needs help from the entire country. If we can make the country pay attention and realize that they might be next, we can make change happen.

  36. Jo on July 12, 2013 at 12:13 pm

    Everyone, no matter where you are, if you can donate money, do it. If you can be there physically, do it. If you can volunteer for an organization, do it. Write a letter to your editor about NC or to a NC paper. There are a million ways to help. NC, Texas, WI, every state under Republican attack needs help from the entire country. If we can make the country pay attention and realize that they might be next, we can make change happen.

  37. Mark on July 12, 2013 at 4:08 pm

    Outside, unlimited contributions to tea party related groups are the reason North Carolina is in the position it is in. Tea Party money pouring in is substantial and effective here because people were sort of complacent…we were never on the leading edge of anything….life was pretty ok and progress was incremental but steady on most fronts. Then whammo-all of a sudden a bunch of commercials about how Obama and Bev Perdue are ruining your life and the real outsiders get elected with the tea party playbook in their satchel.

  38. Mark on July 12, 2013 at 4:08 pm

    Outside, unlimited contributions to tea party related groups are the reason North Carolina is in the position it is in. Tea Party money pouring in is substantial and effective here because people were sort of complacent…we were never on the leading edge of anything….life was pretty ok and progress was incremental but steady on most fronts. Then whammo-all of a sudden a bunch of commercials about how Obama and Bev Perdue are ruining your life and the real outsiders get elected with the tea party playbook in their satchel.

  39. Mark on July 12, 2013 at 4:08 pm

    Outside, unlimited contributions to tea party related groups are the reason North Carolina is in the position it is in. Tea Party money pouring in is substantial and effective here because people were sort of complacent…we were never on the leading edge of anything….life was pretty ok and progress was incremental but steady on most fronts. Then whammo-all of a sudden a bunch of commercials about how Obama and Bev Perdue are ruining your life and the real outsiders get elected with the tea party playbook in their satchel.

  40. Mark on July 12, 2013 at 4:08 pm

    Outside, unlimited contributions to tea party related groups are the reason North Carolina is in the position it is in. Tea Party money pouring in is substantial and effective here because people were sort of complacent…we were never on the leading edge of anything….life was pretty ok and progress was incremental but steady on most fronts. Then whammo-all of a sudden a bunch of commercials about how Obama and Bev Perdue are ruining your life and the real outsiders get elected with the tea party playbook in their satchel.

  41. Olivia M on July 13, 2013 at 12:31 am

    A big part of the problem comes from recent SCOTUS decisions, like Citizens United, which granted businesses the right to give unlimited campaign money.

    In NC, a millionaire named Art Pope has founded a bunch of straw man companies that fund Republican campaigns. The other parties simply can’t financially compete and get enough exposure to win.

    Check out this article for more about that: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/10/10/111010fa_fact_mayer

    This has also affected lobbying- politicians (and judges) will often support the laws with the most money in the pot. That’s not how democracy works, but now that the rules have changed, it’s made equal representation and logical legislation impossible. Today’s politics are nothing more than a monetary pissing contest.

    I hope everyone goes out to vote these guys out, but I don’t know that it will make much of a difference thanks to NC’s gerrymandered 2010 redistricting plan that has clustered and underplayed all historically democratic areas into the same districts.

    Without some systemic changes to even the playing field, we’re going to continue to see the reign of the dollar.

  42. Olivia M on July 13, 2013 at 12:31 am

    A big part of the problem comes from recent SCOTUS decisions, like Citizens United, which granted businesses the right to give unlimited campaign money.

    In NC, a millionaire named Art Pope has founded a bunch of straw man companies that fund Republican campaigns. The other parties simply can’t financially compete and get enough exposure to win.

    Check out this article for more about that: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/10/10/111010fa_fact_mayer

    This has also affected lobbying- politicians (and judges) will often support the laws with the most money in the pot. That’s not how democracy works, but now that the rules have changed, it’s made equal representation and logical legislation impossible. Today’s politics are nothing more than a monetary pissing contest.

    I hope everyone goes out to vote these guys out, but I don’t know that it will make much of a difference thanks to NC’s gerrymandered 2010 redistricting plan that has clustered and underplayed all historically democratic areas into the same districts.

    Without some systemic changes to even the playing field, we’re going to continue to see the reign of the dollar.

  43. Olivia M on July 13, 2013 at 12:31 am

    A big part of the problem comes from recent SCOTUS decisions, like Citizens United, which granted businesses the right to give unlimited campaign money.

    In NC, a millionaire named Art Pope has founded a bunch of straw man companies that fund Republican campaigns. The other parties simply can’t financially compete and get enough exposure to win.

    Check out this article for more about that: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/10/10/111010fa_fact_mayer

    This has also affected lobbying- politicians (and judges) will often support the laws with the most money in the pot. That’s not how democracy works, but now that the rules have changed, it’s made equal representation and logical legislation impossible. Today’s politics are nothing more than a monetary pissing contest.

    I hope everyone goes out to vote these guys out, but I don’t know that it will make much of a difference thanks to NC’s gerrymandered 2010 redistricting plan that has clustered and underplayed all historically democratic areas into the same districts.

    Without some systemic changes to even the playing field, we’re going to continue to see the reign of the dollar.

  44. Olivia M on July 13, 2013 at 12:31 am

    A big part of the problem comes from recent SCOTUS decisions, like Citizens United, which granted businesses the right to give unlimited campaign money.

    In NC, a millionaire named Art Pope has founded a bunch of straw man companies that fund Republican campaigns. The other parties simply can’t financially compete and get enough exposure to win.

    Check out this article for more about that: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2011/10/10/111010fa_fact_mayer

    This has also affected lobbying- politicians (and judges) will often support the laws with the most money in the pot. That’s not how democracy works, but now that the rules have changed, it’s made equal representation and logical legislation impossible. Today’s politics are nothing more than a monetary pissing contest.

    I hope everyone goes out to vote these guys out, but I don’t know that it will make much of a difference thanks to NC’s gerrymandered 2010 redistricting plan that has clustered and underplayed all historically democratic areas into the same districts.

    Without some systemic changes to even the playing field, we’re going to continue to see the reign of the dollar.

  45. Mary Mountcastle on July 13, 2013 at 11:20 pm

    As someone who has been arrested, thanks to so many of you who are paying attention. We have to believe that democracy will finally prevail but the power of rightwing money means this will be a multi-year process. We must persist. And if you want to help, I echo other suggestions to send a contribution (of whatever size) to the NC NAACP and to follow events on Progress NC’s FB page. They are also trying to make sure folks across the state know what is really happening.

  46. Mary Mountcastle on July 13, 2013 at 11:20 pm

    As someone who has been arrested, thanks to so many of you who are paying attention. We have to believe that democracy will finally prevail but the power of rightwing money means this will be a multi-year process. We must persist. And if you want to help, I echo other suggestions to send a contribution (of whatever size) to the NC NAACP and to follow events on Progress NC’s FB page. They are also trying to make sure folks across the state know what is really happening.

  47. Mary Mountcastle on July 13, 2013 at 11:20 pm

    As someone who has been arrested, thanks to so many of you who are paying attention. We have to believe that democracy will finally prevail but the power of rightwing money means this will be a multi-year process. We must persist. And if you want to help, I echo other suggestions to send a contribution (of whatever size) to the NC NAACP and to follow events on Progress NC’s FB page. They are also trying to make sure folks across the state know what is really happening.

  48. Mary Mountcastle on July 13, 2013 at 11:20 pm

    As someone who has been arrested, thanks to so many of you who are paying attention. We have to believe that democracy will finally prevail but the power of rightwing money means this will be a multi-year process. We must persist. And if you want to help, I echo other suggestions to send a contribution (of whatever size) to the NC NAACP and to follow events on Progress NC’s FB page. They are also trying to make sure folks across the state know what is really happening.

  49. [...] the quality of life for North Carolinians.  Heather Lane Talley says it best in her article for The Feminist Wire, “Moral Mondays represent a significant moment in contemporary political struggle wherein [...]

  50. [...] the quality of life for North Carolinians.  Heather Lane Talley says it best in her article for The Feminist Wire, “Moral Mondays represent a significant moment in contemporary political struggle wherein [...]

  51. [...] the quality of life for North Carolinians.  Heather Lane Talley says it best in her article for The Feminist Wire, “Moral Mondays represent a significant moment in contemporary political struggle wherein [...]

  52. [...] the quality of life for North Carolinians.  Heather Lane Talley says it best in her article for The Feminist Wire, “Moral Mondays represent a significant moment in contemporary political struggle wherein [...]

Follow The Feminist Wire

Arts & Culture

  • 3 poems by Amir Rabiyah amir

    Our Dangerous Sweetness “caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare” -Audre Lorde When I hear the news, another one of us has been killed my heart constricts, I clutch at my own heart, I reach with a frantic grief towards [...]

  • 2 poems by Margaree Little molly little

    BLACKBERRY GARDEN As though by going back to it now it would become clear—or more than that, say what you mean, come right, a resolution of the leaves piling up in the yard, then turning to mulch, behind the house the blackberry bushes taking over the length of the garden.  [...]

  • Two Poems by Erin Parks then and now

    By Erin Parks     3 Queens Haiku Strange and strong Women Transcending normal life things Freedom in a word           For Men Who Claim They Love #TeamNatural My hair is not easy to manipulate. It takes time, patience, and skill. Yes, you must know how [...]