The Rise of Beyoncé, The Fall of Lauryn Hill: A Tale of Two Icons

May 13, 2013
By

By Janell Hobson

tumblr_lvxvzeRkL81qh517to1_400Fifteen years ago, the stardom of then-23-year-old Lauryn Hill had peaked when she released what would become her defining musical legacy.  After rising to popularity as part of the hip-hop trio The Fugees, with fellow members Wyclef Jean and Pras, she later released her solo album, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, which went on to garner multiplatinum sales and five Grammy Awards for the recognizably brilliant singer-rapper.  Such accomplishments made her the first female artist to be nominated for and to win the most Grammys in a single night and her album the first hip-hop-themed work to win the Grammy’s top prize of Album of the Year.

Destiny's Child - No No No Pt_1[20-35-17](1)Interestingly, the same year of Lauryn’s solo album debut, a 16-year-old who would later be known only by her first name – Beyoncé – also emerged on the pop scene when Destiny’s Child released their self-titled debut album.  And in a curious one-degree-of-separation of the two icons, Destiny’s Child’s collaboration with Wyclef on their song “No No No” led to the group’s first successfully released single, which topped R&B charts.

In retrospect, it seems easy to trace what would become a commingled narrative: one star rises while another one declines.  One star (Ms. Hill) presumably declined a starring role in the Hollywood faux-feminist blockbuster, Charlie’s Angels, while the other star (Beyoncé), along with fellow group members, provided the necessary “girl power” anthem – “Independent Women, Part I” – for the movie’s soundtrack.  One star virtually disappeared from the mainstream media while the other star appeared ubiquitously, covering every magazine from Sports Illustrated to Vogue to GQ to the feminist publication Ms.

lauryn_hill_062910_splash_m-250x350One star proved a lyrical genius – rapping and crooning on politics, love, religion, and the resistance of corporate media – while the other preferred more superficial fanfare concerning clubbing, looking fabulous, and having her own money to spend as she fends off heartaches and trifling lovers, while occasionally championing women’s empowerment.  One star refused the pop-culture make-over, preferring instead to rock her natural hair and bask in her dark-skinned beauty, while the other has made a signature look out of blond weaves and other variations on white beauty standards that her light-skinned beauty can more easily appropriate.

imagesStill, it’s complicated. For while Ms. Hill occasionally appeared at concerts in deliberately unattractive getups – to fend off any sexual objectification of her natural beauty – Beyoncé played to the male gaze and crafted a nuanced portrayal of black female desirability: at once appropriating “blonde ambitions” while simultaneously undermining those same white beauty “model-thin size-zero” standards by embracing a “bootylicious” aesthetic of her (and by extension other black women’s) natural curves.  And then there’s the contrast in their personal choices: Ms. Hill eschewed the music industry and traditional marriage to produce six children with long-time partner Rohan Marley, while Beyoncé experienced a meteoric rise on the pop scene and adhered to the traditional standards of marriage and motherhood, when partnering with Shawn “Jay Z” Carter and becoming a mother to a young daughter, Blue Ivy.

hill6In a perfect world, both Lauryn Hill and Beyoncé Knowles-Carter would have their different choices celebrated, would share the spotlight, and would make alternate appearances in mainstream media.  Instead, the ascendancy of one star and the decline of another reveals what Patricia Hill Collins describes as the “politics of containment” concerning the hypervisibility of African American women – in which certain icons are singly, rather than simultaneously, promoted – which is also used to render invisible the multiple forms of oppression that intersect in the lives of the majority of black women in this country, and throughout the world.  By placing the two icons alongside each other, we have an opportunity to examine the treatment of high-profile black women in the public sphere and intersect racial and sexual politics.

beyonce-blonde-mrs-carter-tour-650-430Currently, in 2013, both icons are now positioned with the state in different yet analogous ways.  Beyoncé certainly seems to wield political power – having financially contributed with her husband to the successful re-election campaign of President Barack Obama and singing the National Anthem at his inauguration earlier this year.  However, this did not prevent her from being highly criticized in a “lip-synching” scandal or from being scrutinized on the legitimacy of her wedding-anniversary vacation on the island of Cuba last month.

lauryn-hillStill, these criticisms are rather trivial when compared to the trouble Lauryn Hill has faced this year as she must later serve a three-month prison sentence, with follow-up home-confinement and counseling for her mental health (re: her “conspiracy theory” rants), after pleading guilty to tax evasion.  Whatever one may think of Ms. Hill’s actions, it comes as no surprise that she is now held up in the public sphere as a “criminal” and typical “angry” – even “crazy” – black woman.  That she would now be criminalized at the same time that the FBI has listed former Black Panther Party member Assata Shakur as the first woman among their “Most Wanted Terrorists,” while an inquisitive and intelligent high-school student, Kiera Wilmot, was recently expelled and charged with a felony for a science experiment gone wrong in a Florida school, reminds us all of the continued labeling of black women’s “outsider” and “outlaw” status and the societal need to frame us as “examples” for discipline and punishment.

Philly Fourth Of July JamLauryn Hill and Beyoncé may be very different in their image production and in their career and personal choices, but what binds them together is their function under the high-surveillance gaze as public black women who are being disciplined and contained.  What we can learn from both, however, is their political maneuverings under such a powerful gaze and how they have circulated their rage against the forces of white supremacy, patriarchy, and capitalism.  Both icons have released some of their angriest expressions on the Internet – Beyoncé’s “Bow Down/I Been On,” coupled with her childhood photo as a teen beauty pageant winner with numerous trophies, and Ms. Hill’s “Neurotic Society (Compulsory Mix),” produced under duress at the demand of her record company, SONY, to pay off her fines.  In these moments of rage, one might read between the lines and take note of their refusal to be undermined by excessive criticism or to be boxed in by the corporate and mainstream expectations of pop music artists.

BeyonceBowDownThey may be simply egotistical or “neurotic” or even criminal (in the legal case of Ms. Hill or what was alluded to in the criticism of Beyoncé’s trip to Cuba, for which the pop diva expressed “shock” at the public condemnation she received). However, a black woman who assimilates to cultural standards will still find herself just as scrutinized in public as the ones who don’t. They have nonetheless resisted wider narratives of oppression, which expect black women to remain safely in lanes of servitude and invisibility. While most of us, who listened to both artists 15 years ago, perhaps never predicted their present states, at least they had demonstrated then – and demonstrate today – that they will not play it safe.  Regardless of the corporate and state structures that attempt to contain and control these artists, they refuse to relinquish control of their image and their art.

______________________________________________

picture-2Janell Hobson is an associate professor in the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University at Albany. She has authored two books – Body as Evidence: Mediating Race, Globalizing Gender (2012) and Venus in the Dark: Blackness and Beauty in Popular Culture (2005) – and regularly blogs and writes for Ms. Magazine, including the cover story, “Beyonce’s Fierce Feminism,” in the Ms. Spring 2013 issue.

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176 Responses to The Rise of Beyoncé, The Fall of Lauryn Hill: A Tale of Two Icons

  1. isaidit on May 13, 2013 at 8:53 am

    i like the ambition of the article but to relate the experiences of lauryn and beyonce and speak about some injustice for lauryn is far reaching. listen the miseducation of lauryn hill was a brilliant masterpiece by a then up and coming female black icon that noone had ever seen. but in reality lauryn suffered severe mental issues after her success and it seems like she is dealing with it. that has no reference to beyonce. beyonce just happened to be at the right place at the right time and she sought out to make her own impact in her own way. now i am no way a beyonce superfan. it is highly unlikely i would ever attend a concert. but what is happening to lauryn is not injustice its her own continued mental illness. lets deal with that.

    • Biafra Denmark on May 13, 2013 at 11:23 am

      isaidit: You took the words right out of my mouth.

    • yemi on May 13, 2013 at 8:35 pm

      How do you know of her mental status/state? Are you her doctor? Are you close to her? I think that’s a little presumptuous. Anytime, particularly Black women are outside the societal norms, we deem them crazy or mentally unstable which is bullshit. I’m not saying LH has or doesn’t have mental issues, what I’m saying is that we don’t know for sure because we have no evidence, as far as medical history–not public outbursts. But more often than not we/media uses mental illness–which is a real issue and we shouldn’t exploit it but rather be careful because if it happens to be true then our speculations and assumptions do more harm than good–to disprove and illegitimate people’s criticism of society, the industry they work in, and the system of governance. In the words of Dave Chappelle, “The worst thing to call somebody is crazy. It’s dismissive. “I don’t understand this person. So they’re crazy.” That’s bullshit. These people are not crazy. They strong people. Maybe their environment is a little sick.”

      • Jackie on May 14, 2013 at 12:09 am

        EXACTLY!! I was gettin pissed readin that persons comment on Lauryn’s “illness”…like Blodclat u must be stupid…so thankyou for responding in a much civilized way then I would have!

      • Valerie Craig on June 6, 2013 at 4:31 pm

        I appreciate this response. I am very skeptical of Lauryn’s “diagnosis”, and feel that it is very common in the “industry” to shoot certain performers to the top, use them up, then dismiss them for the next “in-thing”…reminds me of Ice Cubes line in a rap he did long ago, “There’ll be a new N*&&* next year”. Ms. Hill was a more than likely target because she refused to play by the imaginary, but very well executed rules of the entertainment industry. If you look back in time you will see that what has happened to her has happened to MANY African Americans in this line of work…purpose by design in my humble opinion. (Beyonce might want to pay attention).

    • piscesgirl on June 6, 2013 at 6:55 pm

      I too am having a hard time getting the comparison. Lauryn made her own choices. There was no real conclusion of wrap up in thought so we could see where this is going.

  2. isaidit on May 13, 2013 at 8:53 am

    i like the ambition of the article but to relate the experiences of lauryn and beyonce and speak about some injustice for lauryn is far reaching. listen the miseducation of lauryn hill was a brilliant masterpiece by a then up and coming female black icon that noone had ever seen. but in reality lauryn suffered severe mental issues after her success and it seems like she is dealing with it. that has no reference to beyonce. beyonce just happened to be at the right place at the right time and she sought out to make her own impact in her own way. now i am no way a beyonce superfan. it is highly unlikely i would ever attend a concert. but what is happening to lauryn is not injustice its her own continued mental illness. lets deal with that.

    • Biafra Denmark on May 13, 2013 at 11:23 am

      isaidit: You took the words right out of my mouth.

    • yemi on May 13, 2013 at 8:35 pm

      How do you know of her mental status/state? Are you her doctor? Are you close to her? I think that’s a little presumptuous. Anytime, particularly Black women are outside the societal norms, we deem them crazy or mentally unstable which is bullshit. I’m not saying LH has or doesn’t have mental issues, what I’m saying is that we don’t know for sure because we have no evidence, as far as medical history–not public outbursts. But more often than not we/media uses mental illness–which is a real issue and we shouldn’t exploit it but rather be careful because if it happens to be true then our speculations and assumptions do more harm than good–to disprove and illegitimate people’s criticism of society, the industry they work in, and the system of governance. In the words of Dave Chappelle, “The worst thing to call somebody is crazy. It’s dismissive. “I don’t understand this person. So they’re crazy.” That’s bullshit. These people are not crazy. They strong people. Maybe their environment is a little sick.”

      • Jackie on May 14, 2013 at 12:09 am

        EXACTLY!! I was gettin pissed readin that persons comment on Lauryn’s “illness”…like Blodclat u must be stupid…so thankyou for responding in a much civilized way then I would have!

      • Valerie Craig on June 6, 2013 at 4:31 pm

        I appreciate this response. I am very skeptical of Lauryn’s “diagnosis”, and feel that it is very common in the “industry” to shoot certain performers to the top, use them up, then dismiss them for the next “in-thing”…reminds me of Ice Cubes line in a rap he did long ago, “There’ll be a new N*&&* next year”. Ms. Hill was a more than likely target because she refused to play by the imaginary, but very well executed rules of the entertainment industry. If you look back in time you will see that what has happened to her has happened to MANY African Americans in this line of work…purpose by design in my humble opinion. (Beyonce might want to pay attention).

    • piscesgirl on June 6, 2013 at 6:55 pm

      I too am having a hard time getting the comparison. Lauryn made her own choices. There was no real conclusion of wrap up in thought so we could see where this is going.

  3. isaidit on May 13, 2013 at 8:53 am

    i like the ambition of the article but to relate the experiences of lauryn and beyonce and speak about some injustice for lauryn is far reaching. listen the miseducation of lauryn hill was a brilliant masterpiece by a then up and coming female black icon that noone had ever seen. but in reality lauryn suffered severe mental issues after her success and it seems like she is dealing with it. that has no reference to beyonce. beyonce just happened to be at the right place at the right time and she sought out to make her own impact in her own way. now i am no way a beyonce superfan. it is highly unlikely i would ever attend a concert. but what is happening to lauryn is not injustice its her own continued mental illness. lets deal with that.

    • Biafra Denmark on May 13, 2013 at 11:23 am

      isaidit: You took the words right out of my mouth.

    • yemi on May 13, 2013 at 8:35 pm

      How do you know of her mental status/state? Are you her doctor? Are you close to her? I think that’s a little presumptuous. Anytime, particularly Black women are outside the societal norms, we deem them crazy or mentally unstable which is bullshit. I’m not saying LH has or doesn’t have mental issues, what I’m saying is that we don’t know for sure because we have no evidence, as far as medical history–not public outbursts. But more often than not we/media uses mental illness–which is a real issue and we shouldn’t exploit it but rather be careful because if it happens to be true then our speculations and assumptions do more harm than good–to disprove and illegitimate people’s criticism of society, the industry they work in, and the system of governance. In the words of Dave Chappelle, “The worst thing to call somebody is crazy. It’s dismissive. “I don’t understand this person. So they’re crazy.” That’s bullshit. These people are not crazy. They strong people. Maybe their environment is a little sick.”

      • Jackie on May 14, 2013 at 12:09 am

        EXACTLY!! I was gettin pissed readin that persons comment on Lauryn’s “illness”…like Blodclat u must be stupid…so thankyou for responding in a much civilized way then I would have!

      • Valerie Craig on June 6, 2013 at 4:31 pm

        I appreciate this response. I am very skeptical of Lauryn’s “diagnosis”, and feel that it is very common in the “industry” to shoot certain performers to the top, use them up, then dismiss them for the next “in-thing”…reminds me of Ice Cubes line in a rap he did long ago, “There’ll be a new N*&&* next year”. Ms. Hill was a more than likely target because she refused to play by the imaginary, but very well executed rules of the entertainment industry. If you look back in time you will see that what has happened to her has happened to MANY African Americans in this line of work…purpose by design in my humble opinion. (Beyonce might want to pay attention).

    • piscesgirl on June 6, 2013 at 6:55 pm

      I too am having a hard time getting the comparison. Lauryn made her own choices. There was no real conclusion of wrap up in thought so we could see where this is going.

  4. isaidit on May 13, 2013 at 8:53 am

    i like the ambition of the article but to relate the experiences of lauryn and beyonce and speak about some injustice for lauryn is far reaching. listen the miseducation of lauryn hill was a brilliant masterpiece by a then up and coming female black icon that noone had ever seen. but in reality lauryn suffered severe mental issues after her success and it seems like she is dealing with it. that has no reference to beyonce. beyonce just happened to be at the right place at the right time and she sought out to make her own impact in her own way. now i am no way a beyonce superfan. it is highly unlikely i would ever attend a concert. but what is happening to lauryn is not injustice its her own continued mental illness. lets deal with that.

    • Biafra Denmark on May 13, 2013 at 11:23 am

      isaidit: You took the words right out of my mouth.

    • yemi on May 13, 2013 at 8:35 pm

      How do you know of her mental status/state? Are you her doctor? Are you close to her? I think that’s a little presumptuous. Anytime, particularly Black women are outside the societal norms, we deem them crazy or mentally unstable which is bullshit. I’m not saying LH has or doesn’t have mental issues, what I’m saying is that we don’t know for sure because we have no evidence, as far as medical history–not public outbursts. But more often than not we/media uses mental illness–which is a real issue and we shouldn’t exploit it but rather be careful because if it happens to be true then our speculations and assumptions do more harm than good–to disprove and illegitimate people’s criticism of society, the industry they work in, and the system of governance. In the words of Dave Chappelle, “The worst thing to call somebody is crazy. It’s dismissive. “I don’t understand this person. So they’re crazy.” That’s bullshit. These people are not crazy. They strong people. Maybe their environment is a little sick.”

      • Jackie on May 14, 2013 at 12:09 am

        EXACTLY!! I was gettin pissed readin that persons comment on Lauryn’s “illness”…like Blodclat u must be stupid…so thankyou for responding in a much civilized way then I would have!

      • Valerie Craig on June 6, 2013 at 4:31 pm

        I appreciate this response. I am very skeptical of Lauryn’s “diagnosis”, and feel that it is very common in the “industry” to shoot certain performers to the top, use them up, then dismiss them for the next “in-thing”…reminds me of Ice Cubes line in a rap he did long ago, “There’ll be a new N*&&* next year”. Ms. Hill was a more than likely target because she refused to play by the imaginary, but very well executed rules of the entertainment industry. If you look back in time you will see that what has happened to her has happened to MANY African Americans in this line of work…purpose by design in my humble opinion. (Beyonce might want to pay attention).

    • piscesgirl on June 6, 2013 at 6:55 pm

      I too am having a hard time getting the comparison. Lauryn made her own choices. There was no real conclusion of wrap up in thought so we could see where this is going.

  5. tamera on May 13, 2013 at 9:56 am

    I don’t agree that Beyonce has resisted corporate oppression. She feeds into it. She has enjoyed perks because of her acceptance of it. Also, interestingly the author glossed over how Bow Down was insulting and oppressive other women. Beyonce is not some crafty artist, she is simply being told what to do. She went from an overbearing father to an overbearing husband. I really don’t get feminists that keep trying to make Beyonce more complex than she is. As far as Lauryn, she is a myriad of complexities. I don’t know if she has metal health issues, but I do know she has suffered because she has truly resisted. Like Debra Winger before her, Lauryn gave up a luxurious career, at the height of it. I think people tend to forget she was very young when she started with the Fugees and then her own career. So, for her to have willingly walked away from it all, is amazing. How many young stars could have done that? I’d much prefer on article on the resistance of Lauryn. I don’t get what it has to do with Beyonce, who pretty much plays it safe. The criticisms she has received, have usually been her own doing (the most questionable pregnancy in the history of Hollywood), because she likes the attention. Her controversy is contrived, so it’s harder for me to roll with that she is oppressed in anyway, other than probably the personal oppression receives from misogynist and color struck Jay Z.

    • SayItAgainSam on May 13, 2013 at 9:27 pm

      Thank you!

    • courtney on May 14, 2013 at 8:21 am

      Great comment.

    • Monica on May 14, 2013 at 11:38 am

      i agree with your comment.

      did you watch her hbo documentary? i don’t know why it was such a hype and i still don’t understand what the point of it was.

      anyway, boyonce as a feminist? i don’t think so.

    • Browneyes on May 14, 2013 at 12:38 pm

      I think it’s interesting when we talk about “super public icons” and their mental stability. I think we must remember that Hollywood and “this” entertainment industry is a different beast. When “we” so not do what “they” want to be done, they have the power to make you look like “your” the crazy one…thought’s of Dave Chappell come to mind as well. He would not put on a damn dress and they damn near made us think this black man was out of his mind. There ain’t (and yes I said ain’t)a damn thing wrong with Ms Hill…she is doing her own thing and will not conform and if that is mentally unstable, please add me to the list.

      • Keni on June 2, 2013 at 9:35 am

        Dave chevelle has done many strange things but he has never worn a dress

    • FlowerChild on May 14, 2013 at 2:40 pm

      I totally Agree with you tamera!!!
      because I don’t know what in the Heck this Author is talking about!!!

    • ioriginale on May 14, 2013 at 7:24 pm

      THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU!

    • TheDiasporaDiva on May 15, 2013 at 5:25 pm

      Great comment !!

    • bellavera on May 16, 2013 at 11:33 pm

      so eloquently said. thank you!

  6. tamera on May 13, 2013 at 9:56 am

    I don’t agree that Beyonce has resisted corporate oppression. She feeds into it. She has enjoyed perks because of her acceptance of it. Also, interestingly the author glossed over how Bow Down was insulting and oppressive other women. Beyonce is not some crafty artist, she is simply being told what to do. She went from an overbearing father to an overbearing husband. I really don’t get feminists that keep trying to make Beyonce more complex than she is. As far as Lauryn, she is a myriad of complexities. I don’t know if she has metal health issues, but I do know she has suffered because she has truly resisted. Like Debra Winger before her, Lauryn gave up a luxurious career, at the height of it. I think people tend to forget she was very young when she started with the Fugees and then her own career. So, for her to have willingly walked away from it all, is amazing. How many young stars could have done that? I’d much prefer on article on the resistance of Lauryn. I don’t get what it has to do with Beyonce, who pretty much plays it safe. The criticisms she has received, have usually been her own doing (the most questionable pregnancy in the history of Hollywood), because she likes the attention. Her controversy is contrived, so it’s harder for me to roll with that she is oppressed in anyway, other than probably the personal oppression receives from misogynist and color struck Jay Z.

    • SayItAgainSam on May 13, 2013 at 9:27 pm

      Thank you!

    • courtney on May 14, 2013 at 8:21 am

      Great comment.

    • Monica on May 14, 2013 at 11:38 am

      i agree with your comment.

      did you watch her hbo documentary? i don’t know why it was such a hype and i still don’t understand what the point of it was.

      anyway, boyonce as a feminist? i don’t think so.

    • Browneyes on May 14, 2013 at 12:38 pm

      I think it’s interesting when we talk about “super public icons” and their mental stability. I think we must remember that Hollywood and “this” entertainment industry is a different beast. When “we” so not do what “they” want to be done, they have the power to make you look like “your” the crazy one…thought’s of Dave Chappell come to mind as well. He would not put on a damn dress and they damn near made us think this black man was out of his mind. There ain’t (and yes I said ain’t)a damn thing wrong with Ms Hill…she is doing her own thing and will not conform and if that is mentally unstable, please add me to the list.

      • Keni on June 2, 2013 at 9:35 am

        Dave chevelle has done many strange things but he has never worn a dress

    • FlowerChild on May 14, 2013 at 2:40 pm

      I totally Agree with you tamera!!!
      because I don’t know what in the Heck this Author is talking about!!!

    • ioriginale on May 14, 2013 at 7:24 pm

      THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU!

    • TheDiasporaDiva on May 15, 2013 at 5:25 pm

      Great comment !!

    • bellavera on May 16, 2013 at 11:33 pm

      so eloquently said. thank you!

  7. tamera on May 13, 2013 at 9:56 am

    I don’t agree that Beyonce has resisted corporate oppression. She feeds into it. She has enjoyed perks because of her acceptance of it. Also, interestingly the author glossed over how Bow Down was insulting and oppressive other women. Beyonce is not some crafty artist, she is simply being told what to do. She went from an overbearing father to an overbearing husband. I really don’t get feminists that keep trying to make Beyonce more complex than she is. As far as Lauryn, she is a myriad of complexities. I don’t know if she has metal health issues, but I do know she has suffered because she has truly resisted. Like Debra Winger before her, Lauryn gave up a luxurious career, at the height of it. I think people tend to forget she was very young when she started with the Fugees and then her own career. So, for her to have willingly walked away from it all, is amazing. How many young stars could have done that? I’d much prefer on article on the resistance of Lauryn. I don’t get what it has to do with Beyonce, who pretty much plays it safe. The criticisms she has received, have usually been her own doing (the most questionable pregnancy in the history of Hollywood), because she likes the attention. Her controversy is contrived, so it’s harder for me to roll with that she is oppressed in anyway, other than probably the personal oppression receives from misogynist and color struck Jay Z.

    • SayItAgainSam on May 13, 2013 at 9:27 pm

      Thank you!

    • courtney on May 14, 2013 at 8:21 am

      Great comment.

    • Monica on May 14, 2013 at 11:38 am

      i agree with your comment.

      did you watch her hbo documentary? i don’t know why it was such a hype and i still don’t understand what the point of it was.

      anyway, boyonce as a feminist? i don’t think so.

    • Browneyes on May 14, 2013 at 12:38 pm

      I think it’s interesting when we talk about “super public icons” and their mental stability. I think we must remember that Hollywood and “this” entertainment industry is a different beast. When “we” so not do what “they” want to be done, they have the power to make you look like “your” the crazy one…thought’s of Dave Chappell come to mind as well. He would not put on a damn dress and they damn near made us think this black man was out of his mind. There ain’t (and yes I said ain’t)a damn thing wrong with Ms Hill…she is doing her own thing and will not conform and if that is mentally unstable, please add me to the list.

      • Keni on June 2, 2013 at 9:35 am

        Dave chevelle has done many strange things but he has never worn a dress

    • FlowerChild on May 14, 2013 at 2:40 pm

      I totally Agree with you tamera!!!
      because I don’t know what in the Heck this Author is talking about!!!

    • ioriginale on May 14, 2013 at 7:24 pm

      THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU!

    • TheDiasporaDiva on May 15, 2013 at 5:25 pm

      Great comment !!

    • bellavera on May 16, 2013 at 11:33 pm

      so eloquently said. thank you!

  8. tamera on May 13, 2013 at 9:56 am

    I don’t agree that Beyonce has resisted corporate oppression. She feeds into it. She has enjoyed perks because of her acceptance of it. Also, interestingly the author glossed over how Bow Down was insulting and oppressive other women. Beyonce is not some crafty artist, she is simply being told what to do. She went from an overbearing father to an overbearing husband. I really don’t get feminists that keep trying to make Beyonce more complex than she is. As far as Lauryn, she is a myriad of complexities. I don’t know if she has metal health issues, but I do know she has suffered because she has truly resisted. Like Debra Winger before her, Lauryn gave up a luxurious career, at the height of it. I think people tend to forget she was very young when she started with the Fugees and then her own career. So, for her to have willingly walked away from it all, is amazing. How many young stars could have done that? I’d much prefer on article on the resistance of Lauryn. I don’t get what it has to do with Beyonce, who pretty much plays it safe. The criticisms she has received, have usually been her own doing (the most questionable pregnancy in the history of Hollywood), because she likes the attention. Her controversy is contrived, so it’s harder for me to roll with that she is oppressed in anyway, other than probably the personal oppression receives from misogynist and color struck Jay Z.

    • SayItAgainSam on May 13, 2013 at 9:27 pm

      Thank you!

    • courtney on May 14, 2013 at 8:21 am

      Great comment.

    • Monica on May 14, 2013 at 11:38 am

      i agree with your comment.

      did you watch her hbo documentary? i don’t know why it was such a hype and i still don’t understand what the point of it was.

      anyway, boyonce as a feminist? i don’t think so.

    • Browneyes on May 14, 2013 at 12:38 pm

      I think it’s interesting when we talk about “super public icons” and their mental stability. I think we must remember that Hollywood and “this” entertainment industry is a different beast. When “we” so not do what “they” want to be done, they have the power to make you look like “your” the crazy one…thought’s of Dave Chappell come to mind as well. He would not put on a damn dress and they damn near made us think this black man was out of his mind. There ain’t (and yes I said ain’t)a damn thing wrong with Ms Hill…she is doing her own thing and will not conform and if that is mentally unstable, please add me to the list.

      • Keni on June 2, 2013 at 9:35 am

        Dave chevelle has done many strange things but he has never worn a dress

    • FlowerChild on May 14, 2013 at 2:40 pm

      I totally Agree with you tamera!!!
      because I don’t know what in the Heck this Author is talking about!!!

    • ioriginale on May 14, 2013 at 7:24 pm

      THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU!

    • TheDiasporaDiva on May 15, 2013 at 5:25 pm

      Great comment !!

    • bellavera on May 16, 2013 at 11:33 pm

      so eloquently said. thank you!

  9. African American Leadership Forum on May 13, 2013 at 11:14 am

    This was a great positive comparison of them. It’s important for our young Black girls to see both sides of the coin: Lauryn and Beyonce.

  10. African American Leadership Forum on May 13, 2013 at 11:14 am

    This was a great positive comparison of them. It’s important for our young Black girls to see both sides of the coin: Lauryn and Beyonce.

  11. African American Leadership Forum on May 13, 2013 at 11:14 am

    This was a great positive comparison of them. It’s important for our young Black girls to see both sides of the coin: Lauryn and Beyonce.

  12. African American Leadership Forum on May 13, 2013 at 11:14 am

    This was a great positive comparison of them. It’s important for our young Black girls to see both sides of the coin: Lauryn and Beyonce.

  13. Dane on May 13, 2013 at 11:16 am

    Great article and great observation of two completely different but similarly rooted artist. It’s amazing how the two people up me “isaidit” and “tamera” seem to protect and praise Lauryn Hill but reject and disrespect Beyonce. It’s sad we can’t accept we have two sisters who are indeed ICONS which took different avenues to their success. It seems since Beyonce have never publicly discussed her struggles or because she’s never had the image problem Lauryn Hill, she’s not worthy enough. I guess good old professor Willie Lynch is still teaching our community how to hate another through skin color. Either way I support both of my sisters and will continue to praise them even when they fall short of perfection even though that word PERFECT is full of shit. Either you play the political game and keep your job in control or you rebel under the pressure of political game and fall victim. I was once told, keeping it real don’t pay the bills and as we can see Mrs. Hill kept it so real lyrically she created a false hood of realities for herself that she had to maintain which resulted in her down fall. We have to support our people even when they rise and fall, especially when the white media try to tear them down. unfortunately the two commentators before people failed to comprehend this article rooted message but instead comprehended the article with the white mental condition. Divide and conquer.

    • whaaaa? on May 14, 2013 at 3:43 am

      grammar.

    • BeautifulFLower on May 14, 2013 at 10:08 am

      I totally agree with you! I don’t understand why so many sisters hate Beyonce. Why can’t we be pround of our sister for doing her thing and managing to stay out of the bs of Hollywood? Her pregnancy was not questionable, she had a baby! Lauryn Hill is reaping what she has sewn, however, she still deserves our support. No matter what.

    • serenity on May 30, 2013 at 9:10 am

      I used to like beyonce but, it seems like ever since she married jay-z, she became a devil worshiper I no longer care for her n how could she marry someone who thinks he’s God? :(

  14. Dane on May 13, 2013 at 11:16 am

    Great article and great observation of two completely different but similarly rooted artist. It’s amazing how the two people up me “isaidit” and “tamera” seem to protect and praise Lauryn Hill but reject and disrespect Beyonce. It’s sad we can’t accept we have two sisters who are indeed ICONS which took different avenues to their success. It seems since Beyonce have never publicly discussed her struggles or because she’s never had the image problem Lauryn Hill, she’s not worthy enough. I guess good old professor Willie Lynch is still teaching our community how to hate another through skin color. Either way I support both of my sisters and will continue to praise them even when they fall short of perfection even though that word PERFECT is full of shit. Either you play the political game and keep your job in control or you rebel under the pressure of political game and fall victim. I was once told, keeping it real don’t pay the bills and as we can see Mrs. Hill kept it so real lyrically she created a false hood of realities for herself that she had to maintain which resulted in her down fall. We have to support our people even when they rise and fall, especially when the white media try to tear them down. unfortunately the two commentators before people failed to comprehend this article rooted message but instead comprehended the article with the white mental condition. Divide and conquer.

    • whaaaa? on May 14, 2013 at 3:43 am

      grammar.

    • BeautifulFLower on May 14, 2013 at 10:08 am

      I totally agree with you! I don’t understand why so many sisters hate Beyonce. Why can’t we be pround of our sister for doing her thing and managing to stay out of the bs of Hollywood? Her pregnancy was not questionable, she had a baby! Lauryn Hill is reaping what she has sewn, however, she still deserves our support. No matter what.

    • serenity on May 30, 2013 at 9:10 am

      I used to like beyonce but, it seems like ever since she married jay-z, she became a devil worshiper I no longer care for her n how could she marry someone who thinks he’s God? :(

  15. Dane on May 13, 2013 at 11:16 am

    Great article and great observation of two completely different but similarly rooted artist. It’s amazing how the two people up me “isaidit” and “tamera” seem to protect and praise Lauryn Hill but reject and disrespect Beyonce. It’s sad we can’t accept we have two sisters who are indeed ICONS which took different avenues to their success. It seems since Beyonce have never publicly discussed her struggles or because she’s never had the image problem Lauryn Hill, she’s not worthy enough. I guess good old professor Willie Lynch is still teaching our community how to hate another through skin color. Either way I support both of my sisters and will continue to praise them even when they fall short of perfection even though that word PERFECT is full of shit. Either you play the political game and keep your job in control or you rebel under the pressure of political game and fall victim. I was once told, keeping it real don’t pay the bills and as we can see Mrs. Hill kept it so real lyrically she created a false hood of realities for herself that she had to maintain which resulted in her down fall. We have to support our people even when they rise and fall, especially when the white media try to tear them down. unfortunately the two commentators before people failed to comprehend this article rooted message but instead comprehended the article with the white mental condition. Divide and conquer.

    • whaaaa? on May 14, 2013 at 3:43 am

      grammar.

    • BeautifulFLower on May 14, 2013 at 10:08 am

      I totally agree with you! I don’t understand why so many sisters hate Beyonce. Why can’t we be pround of our sister for doing her thing and managing to stay out of the bs of Hollywood? Her pregnancy was not questionable, she had a baby! Lauryn Hill is reaping what she has sewn, however, she still deserves our support. No matter what.

    • serenity on May 30, 2013 at 9:10 am

      I used to like beyonce but, it seems like ever since she married jay-z, she became a devil worshiper I no longer care for her n how could she marry someone who thinks he’s God? :(

  16. Dane on May 13, 2013 at 11:16 am

    Great article and great observation of two completely different but similarly rooted artist. It’s amazing how the two people up me “isaidit” and “tamera” seem to protect and praise Lauryn Hill but reject and disrespect Beyonce. It’s sad we can’t accept we have two sisters who are indeed ICONS which took different avenues to their success. It seems since Beyonce have never publicly discussed her struggles or because she’s never had the image problem Lauryn Hill, she’s not worthy enough. I guess good old professor Willie Lynch is still teaching our community how to hate another through skin color. Either way I support both of my sisters and will continue to praise them even when they fall short of perfection even though that word PERFECT is full of shit. Either you play the political game and keep your job in control or you rebel under the pressure of political game and fall victim. I was once told, keeping it real don’t pay the bills and as we can see Mrs. Hill kept it so real lyrically she created a false hood of realities for herself that she had to maintain which resulted in her down fall. We have to support our people even when they rise and fall, especially when the white media try to tear them down. unfortunately the two commentators before people failed to comprehend this article rooted message but instead comprehended the article with the white mental condition. Divide and conquer.

    • whaaaa? on May 14, 2013 at 3:43 am

      grammar.

    • BeautifulFLower on May 14, 2013 at 10:08 am

      I totally agree with you! I don’t understand why so many sisters hate Beyonce. Why can’t we be pround of our sister for doing her thing and managing to stay out of the bs of Hollywood? Her pregnancy was not questionable, she had a baby! Lauryn Hill is reaping what she has sewn, however, she still deserves our support. No matter what.

    • serenity on May 30, 2013 at 9:10 am

      I used to like beyonce but, it seems like ever since she married jay-z, she became a devil worshiper I no longer care for her n how could she marry someone who thinks he’s God? :(

  17. Carmen on May 13, 2013 at 11:48 am

    The author is trying to compare two separate black women in the spot light that although differ completely in motivation, highlight for us which one is emphasized at what points and why. I think this article is completely relevant and I love that this is being said. If by mental illness one means the anit-capitalist, anti-imperialist, anti-conformist rhetoric that Lauryn Hill continues to utilize I hardly think we are talking about conventional mental illness. What we are looking at is a woman fighting against a monster called imperialism and deep deep seated misogyny and white supremacy that has in fact made her at times look like she is “crazy” by american standards of course. But Beyonce licking her finger and dragging it along her torso during a performance should be considered normal? No. I think it is important to compare because of how these women are treated separately. But I do disagree that Beyonce has tested anything or even made an attempt. She continues to exploit her own body for the benefit of both her own income as well as that of corporations. But yet as the article points out we are able to see how she is contained by this because the definition of sanity is put on the table – Lauryn Hill with her refusal to use her body in this manner becomes a conspiracy theorist and overall bad example and “insane” while Beyonce with the relinquishment of the control of her own body becomes rich and a prime example for women with her faux women empowering lyrics and of course she is considered “sane” to do so. It is the contradiction that gets me: Empower yourself through men’s desire which perpetuates standards for women within heterosexual relationships and continues to pit women against women. Very important distinction you are making and thank you for doing so.

    • askia bilal on May 13, 2013 at 12:58 pm

      Your comments about Lauryn Hill’s mental health are well stated.

    • Paige on May 13, 2013 at 4:46 pm

      Carmen — you’re super right on. Thank you for the comment.

    • Andrea on May 13, 2013 at 4:49 pm

      The writer should not have written this. Ms. Lauryn Hill has not fallen and beyonce has not risen! It’s called life and they are not one in the same beyonce will never be on Ms. Lauryn Hill’s level never! Money and popularity by few do not make one better than the other. God given talent does which Ms Lauryn Hill was blessed with and beyonce was not! Lauryn Hill has not lost her voice or style she is merely going through trials in life as YOU the writer and the rest of us do none of us are exempt! sad piece of writing here I will make sure this website stays off my timeline on every social media page I have!

    • Ken on May 15, 2013 at 4:45 pm

      Well said Carmen!

  18. Carmen on May 13, 2013 at 11:48 am

    The author is trying to compare two separate black women in the spot light that although differ completely in motivation, highlight for us which one is emphasized at what points and why. I think this article is completely relevant and I love that this is being said. If by mental illness one means the anit-capitalist, anti-imperialist, anti-conformist rhetoric that Lauryn Hill continues to utilize I hardly think we are talking about conventional mental illness. What we are looking at is a woman fighting against a monster called imperialism and deep deep seated misogyny and white supremacy that has in fact made her at times look like she is “crazy” by american standards of course. But Beyonce licking her finger and dragging it along her torso during a performance should be considered normal? No. I think it is important to compare because of how these women are treated separately. But I do disagree that Beyonce has tested anything or even made an attempt. She continues to exploit her own body for the benefit of both her own income as well as that of corporations. But yet as the article points out we are able to see how she is contained by this because the definition of sanity is put on the table – Lauryn Hill with her refusal to use her body in this manner becomes a conspiracy theorist and overall bad example and “insane” while Beyonce with the relinquishment of the control of her own body becomes rich and a prime example for women with her faux women empowering lyrics and of course she is considered “sane” to do so. It is the contradiction that gets me: Empower yourself through men’s desire which perpetuates standards for women within heterosexual relationships and continues to pit women against women. Very important distinction you are making and thank you for doing so.

    • askia bilal on May 13, 2013 at 12:58 pm

      Your comments about Lauryn Hill’s mental health are well stated.

    • Paige on May 13, 2013 at 4:46 pm

      Carmen — you’re super right on. Thank you for the comment.

    • Andrea on May 13, 2013 at 4:49 pm

      The writer should not have written this. Ms. Lauryn Hill has not fallen and beyonce has not risen! It’s called life and they are not one in the same beyonce will never be on Ms. Lauryn Hill’s level never! Money and popularity by few do not make one better than the other. God given talent does which Ms Lauryn Hill was blessed with and beyonce was not! Lauryn Hill has not lost her voice or style she is merely going through trials in life as YOU the writer and the rest of us do none of us are exempt! sad piece of writing here I will make sure this website stays off my timeline on every social media page I have!

    • Ken on May 15, 2013 at 4:45 pm

      Well said Carmen!

  19. Carmen on May 13, 2013 at 11:48 am

    The author is trying to compare two separate black women in the spot light that although differ completely in motivation, highlight for us which one is emphasized at what points and why. I think this article is completely relevant and I love that this is being said. If by mental illness one means the anit-capitalist, anti-imperialist, anti-conformist rhetoric that Lauryn Hill continues to utilize I hardly think we are talking about conventional mental illness. What we are looking at is a woman fighting against a monster called imperialism and deep deep seated misogyny and white supremacy that has in fact made her at times look like she is “crazy” by american standards of course. But Beyonce licking her finger and dragging it along her torso during a performance should be considered normal? No. I think it is important to compare because of how these women are treated separately. But I do disagree that Beyonce has tested anything or even made an attempt. She continues to exploit her own body for the benefit of both her own income as well as that of corporations. But yet as the article points out we are able to see how she is contained by this because the definition of sanity is put on the table – Lauryn Hill with her refusal to use her body in this manner becomes a conspiracy theorist and overall bad example and “insane” while Beyonce with the relinquishment of the control of her own body becomes rich and a prime example for women with her faux women empowering lyrics and of course she is considered “sane” to do so. It is the contradiction that gets me: Empower yourself through men’s desire which perpetuates standards for women within heterosexual relationships and continues to pit women against women. Very important distinction you are making and thank you for doing so.

    • askia bilal on May 13, 2013 at 12:58 pm

      Your comments about Lauryn Hill’s mental health are well stated.

    • Paige on May 13, 2013 at 4:46 pm

      Carmen — you’re super right on. Thank you for the comment.

    • Andrea on May 13, 2013 at 4:49 pm

      The writer should not have written this. Ms. Lauryn Hill has not fallen and beyonce has not risen! It’s called life and they are not one in the same beyonce will never be on Ms. Lauryn Hill’s level never! Money and popularity by few do not make one better than the other. God given talent does which Ms Lauryn Hill was blessed with and beyonce was not! Lauryn Hill has not lost her voice or style she is merely going through trials in life as YOU the writer and the rest of us do none of us are exempt! sad piece of writing here I will make sure this website stays off my timeline on every social media page I have!

    • Ken on May 15, 2013 at 4:45 pm

      Well said Carmen!

  20. Carmen on May 13, 2013 at 11:48 am

    The author is trying to compare two separate black women in the spot light that although differ completely in motivation, highlight for us which one is emphasized at what points and why. I think this article is completely relevant and I love that this is being said. If by mental illness one means the anit-capitalist, anti-imperialist, anti-conformist rhetoric that Lauryn Hill continues to utilize I hardly think we are talking about conventional mental illness. What we are looking at is a woman fighting against a monster called imperialism and deep deep seated misogyny and white supremacy that has in fact made her at times look like she is “crazy” by american standards of course. But Beyonce licking her finger and dragging it along her torso during a performance should be considered normal? No. I think it is important to compare because of how these women are treated separately. But I do disagree that Beyonce has tested anything or even made an attempt. She continues to exploit her own body for the benefit of both her own income as well as that of corporations. But yet as the article points out we are able to see how she is contained by this because the definition of sanity is put on the table – Lauryn Hill with her refusal to use her body in this manner becomes a conspiracy theorist and overall bad example and “insane” while Beyonce with the relinquishment of the control of her own body becomes rich and a prime example for women with her faux women empowering lyrics and of course she is considered “sane” to do so. It is the contradiction that gets me: Empower yourself through men’s desire which perpetuates standards for women within heterosexual relationships and continues to pit women against women. Very important distinction you are making and thank you for doing so.

    • askia bilal on May 13, 2013 at 12:58 pm

      Your comments about Lauryn Hill’s mental health are well stated.

    • Paige on May 13, 2013 at 4:46 pm

      Carmen — you’re super right on. Thank you for the comment.

    • Andrea on May 13, 2013 at 4:49 pm

      The writer should not have written this. Ms. Lauryn Hill has not fallen and beyonce has not risen! It’s called life and they are not one in the same beyonce will never be on Ms. Lauryn Hill’s level never! Money and popularity by few do not make one better than the other. God given talent does which Ms Lauryn Hill was blessed with and beyonce was not! Lauryn Hill has not lost her voice or style she is merely going through trials in life as YOU the writer and the rest of us do none of us are exempt! sad piece of writing here I will make sure this website stays off my timeline on every social media page I have!

    • Ken on May 15, 2013 at 4:45 pm

      Well said Carmen!

  21. Sam Marrero on May 13, 2013 at 12:34 pm

    “Look at your career they said / Lauryn baby use your head”

    • Kem on May 13, 2013 at 10:36 pm

      Enough said! lol

  22. Sam Marrero on May 13, 2013 at 12:34 pm

    “Look at your career they said / Lauryn baby use your head”

    • Kem on May 13, 2013 at 10:36 pm

      Enough said! lol

  23. Sam Marrero on May 13, 2013 at 12:34 pm

    “Look at your career they said / Lauryn baby use your head”

    • Kem on May 13, 2013 at 10:36 pm

      Enough said! lol

  24. Sam Marrero on May 13, 2013 at 12:34 pm

    “Look at your career they said / Lauryn baby use your head”

    • Kem on May 13, 2013 at 10:36 pm

      Enough said! lol

  25. Halona Black on May 13, 2013 at 12:54 pm

    I’m not quite sure I understand the significance of this comparison. And to say that Lauryn Hill has “fallen,” is unfair. People still love Lauryn and pay money to see her perform songs from one album released 15 years ago. That, to me, is a success. And she has done it on her own terms. I love Lauryn because she is intelligent and has refused to let the “industry” get in the way of her raising her children. Beyonce’s first concern after having her baby was going on tour because she didn’t want to “lose herself…” What’s wrong with losing yourself in the raising of your own children, particularly when your a multi-millionaire?

    • Carmen on May 13, 2013 at 2:37 pm

      I agree the word “fallen” is unfair but examining her fall from main stream is what I think she means. and lets be honest main stream is called such because it is what the majority is listening to. I love Lauryn and see her as fresh, real, honest and fuck lets just say it healthy – she is what young girls need to see and listen to. Unfortunatley and to this author’s credit she has in fact fallen from main stream and is repeatedly referred to as fragmented, mentally ill, and the list goes on. She is seen as sad instead of transcendent and I am angry at this. She is pitied too often which is an insult to the role of women in art. I agree with you also on losing yourself because one day I think Beyonce will wake up and not want to be shackled by fame in main stream I think she will. I hope she will.

  26. Halona Black on May 13, 2013 at 12:54 pm

    I’m not quite sure I understand the significance of this comparison. And to say that Lauryn Hill has “fallen,” is unfair. People still love Lauryn and pay money to see her perform songs from one album released 15 years ago. That, to me, is a success. And she has done it on her own terms. I love Lauryn because she is intelligent and has refused to let the “industry” get in the way of her raising her children. Beyonce’s first concern after having her baby was going on tour because she didn’t want to “lose herself…” What’s wrong with losing yourself in the raising of your own children, particularly when your a multi-millionaire?

    • Carmen on May 13, 2013 at 2:37 pm

      I agree the word “fallen” is unfair but examining her fall from main stream is what I think she means. and lets be honest main stream is called such because it is what the majority is listening to. I love Lauryn and see her as fresh, real, honest and fuck lets just say it healthy – she is what young girls need to see and listen to. Unfortunatley and to this author’s credit she has in fact fallen from main stream and is repeatedly referred to as fragmented, mentally ill, and the list goes on. She is seen as sad instead of transcendent and I am angry at this. She is pitied too often which is an insult to the role of women in art. I agree with you also on losing yourself because one day I think Beyonce will wake up and not want to be shackled by fame in main stream I think she will. I hope she will.

  27. Halona Black on May 13, 2013 at 12:54 pm

    I’m not quite sure I understand the significance of this comparison. And to say that Lauryn Hill has “fallen,” is unfair. People still love Lauryn and pay money to see her perform songs from one album released 15 years ago. That, to me, is a success. And she has done it on her own terms. I love Lauryn because she is intelligent and has refused to let the “industry” get in the way of her raising her children. Beyonce’s first concern after having her baby was going on tour because she didn’t want to “lose herself…” What’s wrong with losing yourself in the raising of your own children, particularly when your a multi-millionaire?

    • Carmen on May 13, 2013 at 2:37 pm

      I agree the word “fallen” is unfair but examining her fall from main stream is what I think she means. and lets be honest main stream is called such because it is what the majority is listening to. I love Lauryn and see her as fresh, real, honest and fuck lets just say it healthy – she is what young girls need to see and listen to. Unfortunatley and to this author’s credit she has in fact fallen from main stream and is repeatedly referred to as fragmented, mentally ill, and the list goes on. She is seen as sad instead of transcendent and I am angry at this. She is pitied too often which is an insult to the role of women in art. I agree with you also on losing yourself because one day I think Beyonce will wake up and not want to be shackled by fame in main stream I think she will. I hope she will.

  28. Halona Black on May 13, 2013 at 12:54 pm

    I’m not quite sure I understand the significance of this comparison. And to say that Lauryn Hill has “fallen,” is unfair. People still love Lauryn and pay money to see her perform songs from one album released 15 years ago. That, to me, is a success. And she has done it on her own terms. I love Lauryn because she is intelligent and has refused to let the “industry” get in the way of her raising her children. Beyonce’s first concern after having her baby was going on tour because she didn’t want to “lose herself…” What’s wrong with losing yourself in the raising of your own children, particularly when your a multi-millionaire?

    • Carmen on May 13, 2013 at 2:37 pm

      I agree the word “fallen” is unfair but examining her fall from main stream is what I think she means. and lets be honest main stream is called such because it is what the majority is listening to. I love Lauryn and see her as fresh, real, honest and fuck lets just say it healthy – she is what young girls need to see and listen to. Unfortunatley and to this author’s credit she has in fact fallen from main stream and is repeatedly referred to as fragmented, mentally ill, and the list goes on. She is seen as sad instead of transcendent and I am angry at this. She is pitied too often which is an insult to the role of women in art. I agree with you also on losing yourself because one day I think Beyonce will wake up and not want to be shackled by fame in main stream I think she will. I hope she will.

  29. Steph on May 13, 2013 at 1:59 pm

    It’s sad that one woman must be bashed in order for another to be praised; that Beyonce has to be critiqued in order for Lauryn’s failings as an artist to be understood. I happen to like both artists and other than the fact that they’re black, I’m not sure why they are being compared. We complain about “others” holding us down? We do it ourselves by acting as if only one of us can achieve at a time which is false.

  30. Steph on May 13, 2013 at 1:59 pm

    It’s sad that one woman must be bashed in order for another to be praised; that Beyonce has to be critiqued in order for Lauryn’s failings as an artist to be understood. I happen to like both artists and other than the fact that they’re black, I’m not sure why they are being compared. We complain about “others” holding us down? We do it ourselves by acting as if only one of us can achieve at a time which is false.

  31. Steph on May 13, 2013 at 1:59 pm

    It’s sad that one woman must be bashed in order for another to be praised; that Beyonce has to be critiqued in order for Lauryn’s failings as an artist to be understood. I happen to like both artists and other than the fact that they’re black, I’m not sure why they are being compared. We complain about “others” holding us down? We do it ourselves by acting as if only one of us can achieve at a time which is false.

  32. Steph on May 13, 2013 at 1:59 pm

    It’s sad that one woman must be bashed in order for another to be praised; that Beyonce has to be critiqued in order for Lauryn’s failings as an artist to be understood. I happen to like both artists and other than the fact that they’re black, I’m not sure why they are being compared. We complain about “others” holding us down? We do it ourselves by acting as if only one of us can achieve at a time which is false.

  33. say what you want on May 13, 2013 at 2:33 pm

    I’m not of African American descent, but I am a music lover.

    Say what you what pandering to standards of aesthetic, but Lauryn had already established herself as an artist that shunned the norm. Her pure talent shone through regardless, and yes that will be her legacy.

    But, for whatever reason, her music suffered. She didn’t have another anthem that resonated as much as Doo Wop or an album as classic as Miseducation. The Fugees reunioned misfired, there was no sophomore single. Not even a guest verse or appearance anywhere.

    Beyonce, from early on, was preparing herself for the pop culture machine, and her closest support system, her immediately family, was on the same page with her readying themselves for a life in show business. These were their goals, and they’re achieving and exceeding them. Is Beyonce really to be faulted for it? Should she not be celebrated, instead?

    And while Ms. Hill can still live off of the legacy of one classic album, anyone who has been to her shows recently knows she’s notorious for showing up hours late, and remixing her beloved material beyond recognition. Once is enough for me, thanks.

    I disagree with the notion that the entertainment ‘machine’ had it in for one over the other. There was certainly enough room for both artists on any end of the spectrum to thrive and succeed for decades.

    I wish them both care and blessings for their future endeavours.

    • Carmen on May 14, 2013 at 6:55 pm

      “But, for whatever reason, her music suffered. She didn’t have another anthem….”

      I think this is a matter of defining success. Regardless of whether she is late to her shows or whatever when you hear her sing “I get out” and you see her cry tears or you witness someone show their humanity by stopping in the middle of the song and saying “wait I forgot the lyrics okay lets start over” you see just how beautiful the mess really is because it really makes you feel close to her. It breaks down that heirarchical structure of performer and spectator and all of a sudden you are two humans in a room and you relate. No it is not Beyonce with her shine and the carefully choreographed steps and notes and perfectly timed rythym that it is not but it is something more beautiful and human and real. I could care less if she has released any compilation or CD or what not that is not what measures Hill’s success.

  34. say what you want on May 13, 2013 at 2:33 pm

    I’m not of African American descent, but I am a music lover.

    Say what you what pandering to standards of aesthetic, but Lauryn had already established herself as an artist that shunned the norm. Her pure talent shone through regardless, and yes that will be her legacy.

    But, for whatever reason, her music suffered. She didn’t have another anthem that resonated as much as Doo Wop or an album as classic as Miseducation. The Fugees reunioned misfired, there was no sophomore single. Not even a guest verse or appearance anywhere.

    Beyonce, from early on, was preparing herself for the pop culture machine, and her closest support system, her immediately family, was on the same page with her readying themselves for a life in show business. These were their goals, and they’re achieving and exceeding them. Is Beyonce really to be faulted for it? Should she not be celebrated, instead?

    And while Ms. Hill can still live off of the legacy of one classic album, anyone who has been to her shows recently knows she’s notorious for showing up hours late, and remixing her beloved material beyond recognition. Once is enough for me, thanks.

    I disagree with the notion that the entertainment ‘machine’ had it in for one over the other. There was certainly enough room for both artists on any end of the spectrum to thrive and succeed for decades.

    I wish them both care and blessings for their future endeavours.

    • Carmen on May 14, 2013 at 6:55 pm

      “But, for whatever reason, her music suffered. She didn’t have another anthem….”

      I think this is a matter of defining success. Regardless of whether she is late to her shows or whatever when you hear her sing “I get out” and you see her cry tears or you witness someone show their humanity by stopping in the middle of the song and saying “wait I forgot the lyrics okay lets start over” you see just how beautiful the mess really is because it really makes you feel close to her. It breaks down that heirarchical structure of performer and spectator and all of a sudden you are two humans in a room and you relate. No it is not Beyonce with her shine and the carefully choreographed steps and notes and perfectly timed rythym that it is not but it is something more beautiful and human and real. I could care less if she has released any compilation or CD or what not that is not what measures Hill’s success.

  35. say what you want on May 13, 2013 at 2:33 pm

    I’m not of African American descent, but I am a music lover.

    Say what you what pandering to standards of aesthetic, but Lauryn had already established herself as an artist that shunned the norm. Her pure talent shone through regardless, and yes that will be her legacy.

    But, for whatever reason, her music suffered. She didn’t have another anthem that resonated as much as Doo Wop or an album as classic as Miseducation. The Fugees reunioned misfired, there was no sophomore single. Not even a guest verse or appearance anywhere.

    Beyonce, from early on, was preparing herself for the pop culture machine, and her closest support system, her immediately family, was on the same page with her readying themselves for a life in show business. These were their goals, and they’re achieving and exceeding them. Is Beyonce really to be faulted for it? Should she not be celebrated, instead?

    And while Ms. Hill can still live off of the legacy of one classic album, anyone who has been to her shows recently knows she’s notorious for showing up hours late, and remixing her beloved material beyond recognition. Once is enough for me, thanks.

    I disagree with the notion that the entertainment ‘machine’ had it in for one over the other. There was certainly enough room for both artists on any end of the spectrum to thrive and succeed for decades.

    I wish them both care and blessings for their future endeavours.

    • Carmen on May 14, 2013 at 6:55 pm

      “But, for whatever reason, her music suffered. She didn’t have another anthem….”

      I think this is a matter of defining success. Regardless of whether she is late to her shows or whatever when you hear her sing “I get out” and you see her cry tears or you witness someone show their humanity by stopping in the middle of the song and saying “wait I forgot the lyrics okay lets start over” you see just how beautiful the mess really is because it really makes you feel close to her. It breaks down that heirarchical structure of performer and spectator and all of a sudden you are two humans in a room and you relate. No it is not Beyonce with her shine and the carefully choreographed steps and notes and perfectly timed rythym that it is not but it is something more beautiful and human and real. I could care less if she has released any compilation or CD or what not that is not what measures Hill’s success.

  36. say what you want on May 13, 2013 at 2:33 pm

    I’m not of African American descent, but I am a music lover.

    Say what you what pandering to standards of aesthetic, but Lauryn had already established herself as an artist that shunned the norm. Her pure talent shone through regardless, and yes that will be her legacy.

    But, for whatever reason, her music suffered. She didn’t have another anthem that resonated as much as Doo Wop or an album as classic as Miseducation. The Fugees reunioned misfired, there was no sophomore single. Not even a guest verse or appearance anywhere.

    Beyonce, from early on, was preparing herself for the pop culture machine, and her closest support system, her immediately family, was on the same page with her readying themselves for a life in show business. These were their goals, and they’re achieving and exceeding them. Is Beyonce really to be faulted for it? Should she not be celebrated, instead?

    And while Ms. Hill can still live off of the legacy of one classic album, anyone who has been to her shows recently knows she’s notorious for showing up hours late, and remixing her beloved material beyond recognition. Once is enough for me, thanks.

    I disagree with the notion that the entertainment ‘machine’ had it in for one over the other. There was certainly enough room for both artists on any end of the spectrum to thrive and succeed for decades.

    I wish them both care and blessings for their future endeavours.

    • Carmen on May 14, 2013 at 6:55 pm

      “But, for whatever reason, her music suffered. She didn’t have another anthem….”

      I think this is a matter of defining success. Regardless of whether she is late to her shows or whatever when you hear her sing “I get out” and you see her cry tears or you witness someone show their humanity by stopping in the middle of the song and saying “wait I forgot the lyrics okay lets start over” you see just how beautiful the mess really is because it really makes you feel close to her. It breaks down that heirarchical structure of performer and spectator and all of a sudden you are two humans in a room and you relate. No it is not Beyonce with her shine and the carefully choreographed steps and notes and perfectly timed rythym that it is not but it is something more beautiful and human and real. I could care less if she has released any compilation or CD or what not that is not what measures Hill’s success.

  37. Korey on May 13, 2013 at 5:43 pm

    A more telling comparison would be to compare Ms. Hill with Ms. Jill Scott or Ms. Erykah Badu. All three of those artists have similar lyrical talents and aesthetics. All three have not undergone “traditional” journeys toward marriage and motherhood. However, two of the three continued to regularly put out albums, films, and/or other artistic inspirations throughout the late-90s and the early 2000s. While one, Ms. Hill, did not. The industry’s and audiences’ affinity for Beyonce has nothing to do with the “fall” of Ms. Hill. That affinity has not stopped Ms. Scott or Ms. Badu.

    • Carmen on May 14, 2013 at 6:45 pm

      I disagree Beyonce is very talented and could use that talent a different way.

  38. Korey on May 13, 2013 at 5:43 pm

    A more telling comparison would be to compare Ms. Hill with Ms. Jill Scott or Ms. Erykah Badu. All three of those artists have similar lyrical talents and aesthetics. All three have not undergone “traditional” journeys toward marriage and motherhood. However, two of the three continued to regularly put out albums, films, and/or other artistic inspirations throughout the late-90s and the early 2000s. While one, Ms. Hill, did not. The industry’s and audiences’ affinity for Beyonce has nothing to do with the “fall” of Ms. Hill. That affinity has not stopped Ms. Scott or Ms. Badu.

    • Carmen on May 14, 2013 at 6:45 pm

      I disagree Beyonce is very talented and could use that talent a different way.

  39. Korey on May 13, 2013 at 5:43 pm

    A more telling comparison would be to compare Ms. Hill with Ms. Jill Scott or Ms. Erykah Badu. All three of those artists have similar lyrical talents and aesthetics. All three have not undergone “traditional” journeys toward marriage and motherhood. However, two of the three continued to regularly put out albums, films, and/or other artistic inspirations throughout the late-90s and the early 2000s. While one, Ms. Hill, did not. The industry’s and audiences’ affinity for Beyonce has nothing to do with the “fall” of Ms. Hill. That affinity has not stopped Ms. Scott or Ms. Badu.

    • Carmen on May 14, 2013 at 6:45 pm

      I disagree Beyonce is very talented and could use that talent a different way.

  40. Korey on May 13, 2013 at 5:43 pm

    A more telling comparison would be to compare Ms. Hill with Ms. Jill Scott or Ms. Erykah Badu. All three of those artists have similar lyrical talents and aesthetics. All three have not undergone “traditional” journeys toward marriage and motherhood. However, two of the three continued to regularly put out albums, films, and/or other artistic inspirations throughout the late-90s and the early 2000s. While one, Ms. Hill, did not. The industry’s and audiences’ affinity for Beyonce has nothing to do with the “fall” of Ms. Hill. That affinity has not stopped Ms. Scott or Ms. Badu.

    • Carmen on May 14, 2013 at 6:45 pm

      I disagree Beyonce is very talented and could use that talent a different way.

  41. [...] Another interesting article on the debate of the portrayal of African American women in mainstream media: http://thefeministwire.com/2013/05/the-rise-of-beyonce-the-fall-of-lauryn-hill-a-tale-of-two-icons/ [...]

  42. [...] Another interesting article on the debate of the portrayal of African American women in mainstream media: http://thefeministwire.com/2013/05/the-rise-of-beyonce-the-fall-of-lauryn-hill-a-tale-of-two-icons/ [...]

  43. [...] Another interesting article on the debate of the portrayal of African American women in mainstream media: http://thefeministwire.com/2013/05/the-rise-of-beyonce-the-fall-of-lauryn-hill-a-tale-of-two-icons/ [...]

  44. [...] Another interesting article on the debate of the portrayal of African American women in mainstream media: http://thefeministwire.com/2013/05/the-rise-of-beyonce-the-fall-of-lauryn-hill-a-tale-of-two-icons/ [...]

  45. Janell Hobson on May 13, 2013 at 10:16 pm

    Thank you everyone for your comments on my article. It’s interesting that – whether or not you agree with my assessment of the two icons – some feel that the two women shouldn’t even be compared, which seems to me a very strange argument.

    Why wouldn’t we compare the two? In my everyday conversations with friends, if we ever talk about black women in music, they are often the go-to women that we discuss, which is why I thought it was fruitful to look at their career and iconic trajectories in sync.

    Not to mention that both were poised and were at the pinnacle of pop music during different stages of their careers. And, yes, the way the two stars are positioned at this particular moment calls for a comparison in the way black women are treated in the public sphere.

    Sometimes, one CAN compare Apples and Oranges if the subject at hand is a FRUIT BOWL and what is in it!

    I would also add, the very fact that Beyonce might be viewed unfavorably in comparison to Lauryn Hill and what she represents, has everything to do with the comparisons we are voluntarily or involuntarily making – we’re simply comparing opposites.

    Thanks again for your feedback!

    • BigFren on June 3, 2013 at 5:06 pm

      Not in full agreement but interesting perspective. I believe would be better suited to a discussion about Alecia Keys vs India Arie. Choices matter

  46. Janell Hobson on May 13, 2013 at 10:16 pm

    Thank you everyone for your comments on my article. It’s interesting that – whether or not you agree with my assessment of the two icons – some feel that the two women shouldn’t even be compared, which seems to me a very strange argument.

    Why wouldn’t we compare the two? In my everyday conversations with friends, if we ever talk about black women in music, they are often the go-to women that we discuss, which is why I thought it was fruitful to look at their career and iconic trajectories in sync.

    Not to mention that both were poised and were at the pinnacle of pop music during different stages of their careers. And, yes, the way the two stars are positioned at this particular moment calls for a comparison in the way black women are treated in the public sphere.

    Sometimes, one CAN compare Apples and Oranges if the subject at hand is a FRUIT BOWL and what is in it!

    I would also add, the very fact that Beyonce might be viewed unfavorably in comparison to Lauryn Hill and what she represents, has everything to do with the comparisons we are voluntarily or involuntarily making – we’re simply comparing opposites.

    Thanks again for your feedback!

    • BigFren on June 3, 2013 at 5:06 pm

      Not in full agreement but interesting perspective. I believe would be better suited to a discussion about Alecia Keys vs India Arie. Choices matter

  47. Janell Hobson on May 13, 2013 at 10:16 pm

    Thank you everyone for your comments on my article. It’s interesting that – whether or not you agree with my assessment of the two icons – some feel that the two women shouldn’t even be compared, which seems to me a very strange argument.

    Why wouldn’t we compare the two? In my everyday conversations with friends, if we ever talk about black women in music, they are often the go-to women that we discuss, which is why I thought it was fruitful to look at their career and iconic trajectories in sync.

    Not to mention that both were poised and were at the pinnacle of pop music during different stages of their careers. And, yes, the way the two stars are positioned at this particular moment calls for a comparison in the way black women are treated in the public sphere.

    Sometimes, one CAN compare Apples and Oranges if the subject at hand is a FRUIT BOWL and what is in it!

    I would also add, the very fact that Beyonce might be viewed unfavorably in comparison to Lauryn Hill and what she represents, has everything to do with the comparisons we are voluntarily or involuntarily making – we’re simply comparing opposites.

    Thanks again for your feedback!

    • BigFren on June 3, 2013 at 5:06 pm

      Not in full agreement but interesting perspective. I believe would be better suited to a discussion about Alecia Keys vs India Arie. Choices matter

  48. Janell Hobson on May 13, 2013 at 10:16 pm

    Thank you everyone for your comments on my article. It’s interesting that – whether or not you agree with my assessment of the two icons – some feel that the two women shouldn’t even be compared, which seems to me a very strange argument.

    Why wouldn’t we compare the two? In my everyday conversations with friends, if we ever talk about black women in music, they are often the go-to women that we discuss, which is why I thought it was fruitful to look at their career and iconic trajectories in sync.

    Not to mention that both were poised and were at the pinnacle of pop music during different stages of their careers. And, yes, the way the two stars are positioned at this particular moment calls for a comparison in the way black women are treated in the public sphere.

    Sometimes, one CAN compare Apples and Oranges if the subject at hand is a FRUIT BOWL and what is in it!

    I would also add, the very fact that Beyonce might be viewed unfavorably in comparison to Lauryn Hill and what she represents, has everything to do with the comparisons we are voluntarily or involuntarily making – we’re simply comparing opposites.

    Thanks again for your feedback!

    • BigFren on June 3, 2013 at 5:06 pm

      Not in full agreement but interesting perspective. I believe would be better suited to a discussion about Alecia Keys vs India Arie. Choices matter

  49. [...] feminist wire analysiert die Karrieren und Selbst_Repräsentationen von Beyoncé und Lauryn Hill und entdeckt trotz der Unterschiede nicht wenige Gemeinsamkeiten. [...]

  50. [...] feminist wire analysiert die Karrieren und Selbst_Repräsentationen von Beyoncé und Lauryn Hill und entdeckt trotz der Unterschiede nicht wenige Gemeinsamkeiten. [...]

  51. [...] feminist wire analysiert die Karrieren und Selbst_Repräsentationen von Beyoncé und Lauryn Hill und entdeckt trotz der Unterschiede nicht wenige Gemeinsamkeiten. [...]

  52. [...] feminist wire analysiert die Karrieren und Selbst_Repräsentationen von Beyoncé und Lauryn Hill und entdeckt trotz der Unterschiede nicht wenige Gemeinsamkeiten. [...]

  53. CanuFeelMe on May 16, 2013 at 12:11 am

    After listening to all the comments views, and arguments, it leads me to believe that we are blinded by hype, culture appreciation, known as art without understanding purpose. Both of these ladies whether we like it or not was packaged to attract certain markets or sector of people. Lauryn even as a member of Fugee was portrayed as a tough but fragile woman. Beyoncé was strictly sex appeal. The difference is Beyoncé was quite content with marketing this package. Lauryn, however, wanted to express her viewpoints about government, politics, religion, and economic depravity, saw first hand what happen when you decide to write your own rules to the game, that’s not going to happen. There has been many others who were enlighten and wanted to express or become their own producer and found themselves black ball, killed, label as crazy, etc. It’s call conformity. One comment dealt with this when it all said and done people are only concern about what it take to keep bread on the table, but the sad reality is there is nothing new under the sun. In the bible it is referred to as bowing down to the music, just like in Daniels and the Hebrew boys day, though many came out of Israel, only a few was unwilling to bow down. This can be said now, Beyoncé indeed bowed down and played the game and Lauryn initially didn’t. However 15 years and 6 children later has forced her to come out and dance once again to the record industry’s (Sony) music. In closing the question that really on the table is not the parallel of 2 lives, but the number of people that both has led astray and on a path to hell. Beyoncé has young girls marketing their bodies for fame or what they call success, and Lauryn with all her good intention has promoted children out of wedlock and it’s funny how no matter what your true intentions are people always seem to follow the worst things and forget all the better things that were presented. Though Beyoncé has not been outspoken about the ills of show business and Lauryn has at the end of the day both or selling death and destruction and without repentance many are hell bound. The miseducation of Lauryn Hll was not genius work, simply the story of a young woman deceived confusing lust with love and her reactions to her choice. This story is played out in our culture everyday and many can and still do relate to this; however, true empowerment would be to show them how to get out and not give glory to being deceived. Sadly, this deception was played out in Lauryn.s life confusing lust with love.

    • Justbeingabratnow:)Carmen on May 17, 2013 at 1:09 am

      Sorry no do not feel you at all especially when you choose to weigh Hill in the same confinement she has begged to be released from -”out of wedlock” are you serious? And believe me neither of these women are in any way decieved lets not make them puppets in this situation – they are very much the players and not the played thank you. And yes Hill still very much involved in the music industry but continues to use this as a platform in which she recreates and does not perpetuate. Beyonce sadly does not.

  54. CanuFeelMe on May 16, 2013 at 12:11 am

    After listening to all the comments views, and arguments, it leads me to believe that we are blinded by hype, culture appreciation, known as art without understanding purpose. Both of these ladies whether we like it or not was packaged to attract certain markets or sector of people. Lauryn even as a member of Fugee was portrayed as a tough but fragile woman. Beyoncé was strictly sex appeal. The difference is Beyoncé was quite content with marketing this package. Lauryn, however, wanted to express her viewpoints about government, politics, religion, and economic depravity, saw first hand what happen when you decide to write your own rules to the game, that’s not going to happen. There has been many others who were enlighten and wanted to express or become their own producer and found themselves black ball, killed, label as crazy, etc. It’s call conformity. One comment dealt with this when it all said and done people are only concern about what it take to keep bread on the table, but the sad reality is there is nothing new under the sun. In the bible it is referred to as bowing down to the music, just like in Daniels and the Hebrew boys day, though many came out of Israel, only a few was unwilling to bow down. This can be said now, Beyoncé indeed bowed down and played the game and Lauryn initially didn’t. However 15 years and 6 children later has forced her to come out and dance once again to the record industry’s (Sony) music. In closing the question that really on the table is not the parallel of 2 lives, but the number of people that both has led astray and on a path to hell. Beyoncé has young girls marketing their bodies for fame or what they call success, and Lauryn with all her good intention has promoted children out of wedlock and it’s funny how no matter what your true intentions are people always seem to follow the worst things and forget all the better things that were presented. Though Beyoncé has not been outspoken about the ills of show business and Lauryn has at the end of the day both or selling death and destruction and without repentance many are hell bound. The miseducation of Lauryn Hll was not genius work, simply the story of a young woman deceived confusing lust with love and her reactions to her choice. This story is played out in our culture everyday and many can and still do relate to this; however, true empowerment would be to show them how to get out and not give glory to being deceived. Sadly, this deception was played out in Lauryn.s life confusing lust with love.

    • Justbeingabratnow:)Carmen on May 17, 2013 at 1:09 am

      Sorry no do not feel you at all especially when you choose to weigh Hill in the same confinement she has begged to be released from -”out of wedlock” are you serious? And believe me neither of these women are in any way decieved lets not make them puppets in this situation – they are very much the players and not the played thank you. And yes Hill still very much involved in the music industry but continues to use this as a platform in which she recreates and does not perpetuate. Beyonce sadly does not.

  55. CanuFeelMe on May 16, 2013 at 12:11 am

    After listening to all the comments views, and arguments, it leads me to believe that we are blinded by hype, culture appreciation, known as art without understanding purpose. Both of these ladies whether we like it or not was packaged to attract certain markets or sector of people. Lauryn even as a member of Fugee was portrayed as a tough but fragile woman. Beyoncé was strictly sex appeal. The difference is Beyoncé was quite content with marketing this package. Lauryn, however, wanted to express her viewpoints about government, politics, religion, and economic depravity, saw first hand what happen when you decide to write your own rules to the game, that’s not going to happen. There has been many others who were enlighten and wanted to express or become their own producer and found themselves black ball, killed, label as crazy, etc. It’s call conformity. One comment dealt with this when it all said and done people are only concern about what it take to keep bread on the table, but the sad reality is there is nothing new under the sun. In the bible it is referred to as bowing down to the music, just like in Daniels and the Hebrew boys day, though many came out of Israel, only a few was unwilling to bow down. This can be said now, Beyoncé indeed bowed down and played the game and Lauryn initially didn’t. However 15 years and 6 children later has forced her to come out and dance once again to the record industry’s (Sony) music. In closing the question that really on the table is not the parallel of 2 lives, but the number of people that both has led astray and on a path to hell. Beyoncé has young girls marketing their bodies for fame or what they call success, and Lauryn with all her good intention has promoted children out of wedlock and it’s funny how no matter what your true intentions are people always seem to follow the worst things and forget all the better things that were presented. Though Beyoncé has not been outspoken about the ills of show business and Lauryn has at the end of the day both or selling death and destruction and without repentance many are hell bound. The miseducation of Lauryn Hll was not genius work, simply the story of a young woman deceived confusing lust with love and her reactions to her choice. This story is played out in our culture everyday and many can and still do relate to this; however, true empowerment would be to show them how to get out and not give glory to being deceived. Sadly, this deception was played out in Lauryn.s life confusing lust with love.

    • Justbeingabratnow:)Carmen on May 17, 2013 at 1:09 am

      Sorry no do not feel you at all especially when you choose to weigh Hill in the same confinement she has begged to be released from -”out of wedlock” are you serious? And believe me neither of these women are in any way decieved lets not make them puppets in this situation – they are very much the players and not the played thank you. And yes Hill still very much involved in the music industry but continues to use this as a platform in which she recreates and does not perpetuate. Beyonce sadly does not.

  56. CanuFeelMe on May 16, 2013 at 12:11 am

    After listening to all the comments views, and arguments, it leads me to believe that we are blinded by hype, culture appreciation, known as art without understanding purpose. Both of these ladies whether we like it or not was packaged to attract certain markets or sector of people. Lauryn even as a member of Fugee was portrayed as a tough but fragile woman. Beyoncé was strictly sex appeal. The difference is Beyoncé was quite content with marketing this package. Lauryn, however, wanted to express her viewpoints about government, politics, religion, and economic depravity, saw first hand what happen when you decide to write your own rules to the game, that’s not going to happen. There has been many others who were enlighten and wanted to express or become their own producer and found themselves black ball, killed, label as crazy, etc. It’s call conformity. One comment dealt with this when it all said and done people are only concern about what it take to keep bread on the table, but the sad reality is there is nothing new under the sun. In the bible it is referred to as bowing down to the music, just like in Daniels and the Hebrew boys day, though many came out of Israel, only a few was unwilling to bow down. This can be said now, Beyoncé indeed bowed down and played the game and Lauryn initially didn’t. However 15 years and 6 children later has forced her to come out and dance once again to the record industry’s (Sony) music. In closing the question that really on the table is not the parallel of 2 lives, but the number of people that both has led astray and on a path to hell. Beyoncé has young girls marketing their bodies for fame or what they call success, and Lauryn with all her good intention has promoted children out of wedlock and it’s funny how no matter what your true intentions are people always seem to follow the worst things and forget all the better things that were presented. Though Beyoncé has not been outspoken about the ills of show business and Lauryn has at the end of the day both or selling death and destruction and without repentance many are hell bound. The miseducation of Lauryn Hll was not genius work, simply the story of a young woman deceived confusing lust with love and her reactions to her choice. This story is played out in our culture everyday and many can and still do relate to this; however, true empowerment would be to show them how to get out and not give glory to being deceived. Sadly, this deception was played out in Lauryn.s life confusing lust with love.

    • Justbeingabratnow:)Carmen on May 17, 2013 at 1:09 am

      Sorry no do not feel you at all especially when you choose to weigh Hill in the same confinement she has begged to be released from -”out of wedlock” are you serious? And believe me neither of these women are in any way decieved lets not make them puppets in this situation – they are very much the players and not the played thank you. And yes Hill still very much involved in the music industry but continues to use this as a platform in which she recreates and does not perpetuate. Beyonce sadly does not.

  57. [...] friend tagged me on this on facebook: Ms Hill and Beyonce…. Disclaimer: I am very much team Lauryn and not at all team Beyonce. I [...]

  58. [...] friend tagged me on this on facebook: Ms Hill and Beyonce…. Disclaimer: I am very much team Lauryn and not at all team Beyonce. I [...]

  59. [...] friend tagged me on this on facebook: Ms Hill and Beyonce…. Disclaimer: I am very much team Lauryn and not at all team Beyonce. I [...]

  60. [...] friend tagged me on this on facebook: Ms Hill and Beyonce…. Disclaimer: I am very much team Lauryn and not at all team Beyonce. I [...]

  61. CarlieLoh on May 17, 2013 at 2:14 pm

    Someone needs to say it. Marijuana. Lauryn Hill was and still is heavily into it, Beyonce not so much. I don’t know if someone who has a life partner in the Marley family and smokes pot every day and appears on stage stoned, when she rarely appears on stage at all, is on equal footing with someone like Beyonce who isn’t known for lighting up constantly. Could pot usage factor into the wide differences between these two artists?

  62. CarlieLoh on May 17, 2013 at 2:14 pm

    Someone needs to say it. Marijuana. Lauryn Hill was and still is heavily into it, Beyonce not so much. I don’t know if someone who has a life partner in the Marley family and smokes pot every day and appears on stage stoned, when she rarely appears on stage at all, is on equal footing with someone like Beyonce who isn’t known for lighting up constantly. Could pot usage factor into the wide differences between these two artists?

  63. CarlieLoh on May 17, 2013 at 2:14 pm

    Someone needs to say it. Marijuana. Lauryn Hill was and still is heavily into it, Beyonce not so much. I don’t know if someone who has a life partner in the Marley family and smokes pot every day and appears on stage stoned, when she rarely appears on stage at all, is on equal footing with someone like Beyonce who isn’t known for lighting up constantly. Could pot usage factor into the wide differences between these two artists?

  64. CarlieLoh on May 17, 2013 at 2:14 pm

    Someone needs to say it. Marijuana. Lauryn Hill was and still is heavily into it, Beyonce not so much. I don’t know if someone who has a life partner in the Marley family and smokes pot every day and appears on stage stoned, when she rarely appears on stage at all, is on equal footing with someone like Beyonce who isn’t known for lighting up constantly. Could pot usage factor into the wide differences between these two artists?

  65. [...] Hobson’s recent essay, “The Rise of Beyoncé, The Fall of Lauryn Hill: A Tale of Two Icons,” is particularly guilty of this. The piece claims that the trajectory of Beyoncé’s and [...]

  66. [...] Hobson’s recent essay, “The Rise of Beyoncé, The Fall of Lauryn Hill: A Tale of Two Icons,” is particularly guilty of this. The piece claims that the trajectory of Beyoncé’s and [...]

  67. [...] Hobson’s recent essay, “The Rise of Beyoncé, The Fall of Lauryn Hill: A Tale of Two Icons,” is particularly guilty of this. The piece claims that the trajectory of Beyoncé’s and [...]

  68. [...] Hobson’s recent essay, “The Rise of Beyoncé, The Fall of Lauryn Hill: A Tale of Two Icons,” is particularly guilty of this. The piece claims that the trajectory of Beyoncé’s and [...]

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