Deadline Approaching: Call for Submissions for TFW forum on "Race, Racism, and Anti-Racism within Feminisms"

March 20, 2013
By

voc_bio_femininism_1_pic_us_1970_women_right_paradeIn 1979, Black socialist feminist lesbian writer, scholar, and organizer Barbara Smith stood in front of the National Association of Women’s Studies and said the following,

Feminism is the political theory and practice that struggles to free all women: women of color, working-class women, poor women, disabled women, Jewish women, lesbians, old women–as well as white, economically privileged heterosexual women. Anything less than this vision of total freedom is not feminism, but merely female self-aggrandizement. (Smith, “Racism and Women’s Studies,” 1979).

Recent critiques of “white feminist” silence surrounding the misogynist attack against nine-year old actress Quvenzhané Wallis, coupled with – what seems to be – a ubiquitous and ever-growing culture of indifference regarding violence against women of color in general, and “white feminist” taciturnity and/or insensitivity in light of the same, in particular, gives much pause. These realities and critiques call on us to revisit Smith’s vision for feminism as a critical site of total freedom—for everyone.

It is abundantly apparent that “feminism” unmodified has not shown itself to be accountable to the necessary anti-racist project that is required for the liberation of all people. That is, “feminism” unmodified has remained tangibly accountable to “white, economically privileged, heterosexual women” while people of color continue to struggle over whether to even use the word “feminist,” or modify it to reflect the racialized communities they are accountable to through their feminist work(s). Simultaneously, white anti-racist feminists must identify as white anti-racist feminists in order to distinguish their work as accountable to communities of color.

All of this begs the question(s): Does feminism unmodified actually signify white, racist, capitalist, careerist etc. etc. feminism, or in other words “female self-aggrandizement”? Does feminism unmodified work to free all women? If so, how? And if not, why? And finally, what might an unmodified feminist theory and practice, which honors Smith’s definition, look like?

None of these concerns are new, of course. Our present moment, marked by high racial tensions within feminism, violence against women in general and women of color in particular, and critiques of feminist silences, self-aggrandizement, and totalization, requires us to pause, take note, and create critical spaces for addressing the circulation of the term “feminism” (unmodified) and its relationship to race, racism, and anti-racism.

This forum, convened by The Feminist Wire asks us to re/think and re/work the functionality of race within feminist movements, communities, theories, and projects. What models do we have for a feminism that is accountable to what Barbara Smith calls a “vision for total freedom”? How can anti-racist feminists grow their allyship and support other feminists in becoming anti-racist? How might we both critique and move beyond the black/white feminist binary, and deconstruct and reimagine the nuances within each in the process? What is the role of feminists of color in educating white feminists on these issues? And what might feminists of color learn in the process?

If we can end racism within our feminists movements, we might just be able to use feminism to end racism in the wider world. All of us have plenty to learn. Will you join us at the table and have an open, honest, and necessarily risky dialogue? Please submit unpublished critical essays, stories, research briefs, creative works, or “love notes” to Submittable by March 31, 2013. Please also include a brief bio and photo. Finally, please mark your submission “race and feminisms” so that we can easily identify it.

You know what critical essays and stories are, but perhaps you’re wondering what a “love note” is? In these times of growing skepticism and mounting critique rightly aimed at the myriad forms of structural conditions that negatively impact women and children around the world, we recognize the need for self-care and acts of love-making within our communities. Thus, “Love Notes” is a space that exists on TFW where we can counteract the violence of oppressions through offerings of praise, support, solidarity, and love. It is a radical space where we, for once, seek to forego the use of the “master’s tools” (i.e. war; in-fighting; communal dissolution; hatred; separation; and prejudices) by employing a different and revolutionary tactic, namely, love.

We hope this forum will be a constructive intervention, not a reinvention of the same ole tired wheel. We’re interested in historicizing the tensions re: the race/gender/sexuality divide in feminism. However, we’re also interested in inclusivity and nuance; differences among, between, and within feminisms. We are particularly interested in trans-national works that cross multiple complex socio-political and geographic “borders,” to include but certainly not limited to works by Black, Mujerista, Chicana, African, White, Palestinian, Muslim, Asian, Womanist, and other feminists. We’re also interested in intersectional conversations that include class, sexuality, (dis)ability, and other identities alongside race and ethnicity.

In the words of sister Lorde…

[We] cannot afford the luxury of fighting one form of oppression only. [We] cannot believe that freedom from intolerance is the right of only one particular group. And [we] cannot afford to choose between the front upon which [we] must battle these forces of discrimination, wherever they appear to destroy [us]. And when they appear to destroy [us], it will not be long before they appear to destroy you… (Lorde, “There Is No Hierarchy of Oppressions,” 1983).

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Sincerely, TFW Collective

Tags: , , , , , , ,

84 Responses to Deadline Approaching: Call for Submissions for TFW forum on "Race, Racism, and Anti-Racism within Feminisms"

  1. Andrew Paul Schettino on March 11, 2013 at 9:40 am

    Great forum. I’ll try to put together a post!

  2. Andrew Paul Schettino on March 11, 2013 at 9:40 am

    Great forum. I’ll try to put together a post!

  3. Andrew Paul Schettino on March 11, 2013 at 9:40 am

    Great forum. I’ll try to put together a post!

  4. Andrew Paul Schettino on March 11, 2013 at 9:40 am

    Great forum. I’ll try to put together a post!

  5. Maxine Doogan on March 11, 2013 at 10:14 am

    submissions? why does a feminist critic on race use the dominate cultures medium?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 10:20 am

      Thanks for your question. Please consider submitting. Best!

  6. Maxine Doogan on March 11, 2013 at 10:14 am

    submissions? why does a feminist critic on race use the dominate cultures medium?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 10:20 am

      Thanks for your question. Please consider submitting. Best!

  7. Maxine Doogan on March 11, 2013 at 10:14 am

    submissions? why does a feminist critic on race use the dominate cultures medium?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 10:20 am

      Thanks for your question. Please consider submitting. Best!

  8. Maxine Doogan on March 11, 2013 at 10:14 am

    submissions? why does a feminist critic on race use the dominate cultures medium?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 10:20 am

      Thanks for your question. Please consider submitting. Best!

  9. Joyce on March 11, 2013 at 11:35 am

    If my submission is not accepted, I do not want my work used or copied or any of the likes. How can I ensure this?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 1:06 pm

      Thanks for the question. We don’t use works that aren’t accepted.

  10. Joyce on March 11, 2013 at 11:35 am

    If my submission is not accepted, I do not want my work used or copied or any of the likes. How can I ensure this?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 1:06 pm

      Thanks for the question. We don’t use works that aren’t accepted.

  11. Joyce on March 11, 2013 at 11:35 am

    If my submission is not accepted, I do not want my work used or copied or any of the likes. How can I ensure this?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 1:06 pm

      Thanks for the question. We don’t use works that aren’t accepted.

  12. Joyce on March 11, 2013 at 11:35 am

    If my submission is not accepted, I do not want my work used or copied or any of the likes. How can I ensure this?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 1:06 pm

      Thanks for the question. We don’t use works that aren’t accepted.

  13. NoneSoBlind on March 11, 2013 at 5:30 pm

    It’s hilarious you’re making a call for inclusive feminism on a page
    Where image alt texts are gibberish, links have duplicate names, etc etc. Guess you don’t want submissions from disabled women, whatever the color of their skin.

    Clean your house before you ask others to do your work.

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 5:40 pm

      Please read the entire CFP, particularly this portion: “We are particularly interested in trans-national works that cross multiple complex socio-political and geographic “borders,” to include but certainly not limited to works by Black, Mujerista, Chicana, African, White, Palestinian, Muslim, Asian, Womanist, and other feminists. We’re also interested in intersectional conversations that include class, sexuality, (dis)ability, and other identities alongside race and ethnicity.”

      In addition, please check the comment tab for rules of engagement.
      Thanks.

      • bean on March 11, 2013 at 9:02 pm

        tamura & TFW, i think NoneSoBlind may have been referring specifically to the fact that this website (among many others, unfortunately) is not accessible for folks who are disabled (particularly, people who experience low vision). please consider checking out these links:

        * webAIM: “introduction to web accessibility”, including translations into many different languages! (http://webaim.org/intro/)

        * american foundation for the blind: “how to make your blog accessible to blind readers” (http://www.afb.org/section.aspx?SectionID=57&TopicID=167&DocumentID=2757)

        * fierce bodies: “accessibility rules! blogging for beginners” (http://fiercebodies.com/2012/04/accessible-blogging/)

        in solidarity,
        bean l. y.

        • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 9:29 pm

          Thank you. I appreciate this. I think this message was lost, however, given the way the comment was communicated.

        • Sunny on March 12, 2013 at 12:39 pm

          Great resources, bean, thanks for sharing!!!

  14. NoneSoBlind on March 11, 2013 at 5:30 pm

    It’s hilarious you’re making a call for inclusive feminism on a page
    Where image alt texts are gibberish, links have duplicate names, etc etc. Guess you don’t want submissions from disabled women, whatever the color of their skin.

    Clean your house before you ask others to do your work.

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 5:40 pm

      Please read the entire CFP, particularly this portion: “We are particularly interested in trans-national works that cross multiple complex socio-political and geographic “borders,” to include but certainly not limited to works by Black, Mujerista, Chicana, African, White, Palestinian, Muslim, Asian, Womanist, and other feminists. We’re also interested in intersectional conversations that include class, sexuality, (dis)ability, and other identities alongside race and ethnicity.”

      In addition, please check the comment tab for rules of engagement.
      Thanks.

      • bean on March 11, 2013 at 9:02 pm

        tamura & TFW, i think NoneSoBlind may have been referring specifically to the fact that this website (among many others, unfortunately) is not accessible for folks who are disabled (particularly, people who experience low vision). please consider checking out these links:

        * webAIM: “introduction to web accessibility”, including translations into many different languages! (http://webaim.org/intro/)

        * american foundation for the blind: “how to make your blog accessible to blind readers” (http://www.afb.org/section.aspx?SectionID=57&TopicID=167&DocumentID=2757)

        * fierce bodies: “accessibility rules! blogging for beginners” (http://fiercebodies.com/2012/04/accessible-blogging/)

        in solidarity,
        bean l. y.

        • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 9:29 pm

          Thank you. I appreciate this. I think this message was lost, however, given the way the comment was communicated.

        • Sunny on March 12, 2013 at 12:39 pm

          Great resources, bean, thanks for sharing!!!

  15. NoneSoBlind on March 11, 2013 at 5:30 pm

    It’s hilarious you’re making a call for inclusive feminism on a page
    Where image alt texts are gibberish, links have duplicate names, etc etc. Guess you don’t want submissions from disabled women, whatever the color of their skin.

    Clean your house before you ask others to do your work.

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 5:40 pm

      Please read the entire CFP, particularly this portion: “We are particularly interested in trans-national works that cross multiple complex socio-political and geographic “borders,” to include but certainly not limited to works by Black, Mujerista, Chicana, African, White, Palestinian, Muslim, Asian, Womanist, and other feminists. We’re also interested in intersectional conversations that include class, sexuality, (dis)ability, and other identities alongside race and ethnicity.”

      In addition, please check the comment tab for rules of engagement.
      Thanks.

      • bean on March 11, 2013 at 9:02 pm

        tamura & TFW, i think NoneSoBlind may have been referring specifically to the fact that this website (among many others, unfortunately) is not accessible for folks who are disabled (particularly, people who experience low vision). please consider checking out these links:

        * webAIM: “introduction to web accessibility”, including translations into many different languages! (http://webaim.org/intro/)

        * american foundation for the blind: “how to make your blog accessible to blind readers” (http://www.afb.org/section.aspx?SectionID=57&TopicID=167&DocumentID=2757)

        * fierce bodies: “accessibility rules! blogging for beginners” (http://fiercebodies.com/2012/04/accessible-blogging/)

        in solidarity,
        bean l. y.

        • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 9:29 pm

          Thank you. I appreciate this. I think this message was lost, however, given the way the comment was communicated.

        • Sunny on March 12, 2013 at 12:39 pm

          Great resources, bean, thanks for sharing!!!

  16. NoneSoBlind on March 11, 2013 at 5:30 pm

    It’s hilarious you’re making a call for inclusive feminism on a page
    Where image alt texts are gibberish, links have duplicate names, etc etc. Guess you don’t want submissions from disabled women, whatever the color of their skin.

    Clean your house before you ask others to do your work.

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 5:40 pm

      Please read the entire CFP, particularly this portion: “We are particularly interested in trans-national works that cross multiple complex socio-political and geographic “borders,” to include but certainly not limited to works by Black, Mujerista, Chicana, African, White, Palestinian, Muslim, Asian, Womanist, and other feminists. We’re also interested in intersectional conversations that include class, sexuality, (dis)ability, and other identities alongside race and ethnicity.”

      In addition, please check the comment tab for rules of engagement.
      Thanks.

      • bean on March 11, 2013 at 9:02 pm

        tamura & TFW, i think NoneSoBlind may have been referring specifically to the fact that this website (among many others, unfortunately) is not accessible for folks who are disabled (particularly, people who experience low vision). please consider checking out these links:

        * webAIM: “introduction to web accessibility”, including translations into many different languages! (http://webaim.org/intro/)

        * american foundation for the blind: “how to make your blog accessible to blind readers” (http://www.afb.org/section.aspx?SectionID=57&TopicID=167&DocumentID=2757)

        * fierce bodies: “accessibility rules! blogging for beginners” (http://fiercebodies.com/2012/04/accessible-blogging/)

        in solidarity,
        bean l. y.

        • Tamura A. Lomax on March 11, 2013 at 9:29 pm

          Thank you. I appreciate this. I think this message was lost, however, given the way the comment was communicated.

        • Sunny on March 12, 2013 at 12:39 pm

          Great resources, bean, thanks for sharing!!!

  17. Catarina on March 12, 2013 at 8:08 pm

    Where and when is this forum taking place? I didn’t understand that part, sorry! Thank you!

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 12, 2013 at 11:05 pm

      Greetings,
      All of our forums are here–online.

  18. Catarina on March 12, 2013 at 8:08 pm

    Where and when is this forum taking place? I didn’t understand that part, sorry! Thank you!

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 12, 2013 at 11:05 pm

      Greetings,
      All of our forums are here–online.

  19. Catarina on March 12, 2013 at 8:08 pm

    Where and when is this forum taking place? I didn’t understand that part, sorry! Thank you!

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 12, 2013 at 11:05 pm

      Greetings,
      All of our forums are here–online.

  20. Catarina on March 12, 2013 at 8:08 pm

    Where and when is this forum taking place? I didn’t understand that part, sorry! Thank you!

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 12, 2013 at 11:05 pm

      Greetings,
      All of our forums are here–online.

  21. cb on March 16, 2013 at 9:56 am

    could you speak more about what a love note is? perhaps give some concrete examples? I am intrigued but not sure what they are and if they can be to yourself or to others?

  22. cb on March 16, 2013 at 9:56 am

    could you speak more about what a love note is? perhaps give some concrete examples? I am intrigued but not sure what they are and if they can be to yourself or to others?

  23. cb on March 16, 2013 at 9:56 am

    could you speak more about what a love note is? perhaps give some concrete examples? I am intrigued but not sure what they are and if they can be to yourself or to others?

  24. cb on March 16, 2013 at 9:56 am

    could you speak more about what a love note is? perhaps give some concrete examples? I am intrigued but not sure what they are and if they can be to yourself or to others?

  25. Claudia on March 20, 2013 at 3:25 pm

    This sounds like a very important topic. Curious to know whether a audio love note would be accepted. What I mean by that is, a recorded conversation between two friends who have been discussing the topic of love in relation to community organizing and anti-oppression work?

    Also, how many submissions are allowed per person?

    Thanks!

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 20, 2013 at 5:19 pm

      Greetings,

      We prefer writings, however, we may consider recorded video chats. However, they have to be uploaded to youtube first.

  26. Claudia on March 20, 2013 at 3:25 pm

    This sounds like a very important topic. Curious to know whether a audio love note would be accepted. What I mean by that is, a recorded conversation between two friends who have been discussing the topic of love in relation to community organizing and anti-oppression work?

    Also, how many submissions are allowed per person?

    Thanks!

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 20, 2013 at 5:19 pm

      Greetings,

      We prefer writings, however, we may consider recorded video chats. However, they have to be uploaded to youtube first.

  27. Claudia on March 20, 2013 at 3:25 pm

    This sounds like a very important topic. Curious to know whether a audio love note would be accepted. What I mean by that is, a recorded conversation between two friends who have been discussing the topic of love in relation to community organizing and anti-oppression work?

    Also, how many submissions are allowed per person?

    Thanks!

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 20, 2013 at 5:19 pm

      Greetings,

      We prefer writings, however, we may consider recorded video chats. However, they have to be uploaded to youtube first.

  28. Claudia on March 20, 2013 at 3:25 pm

    This sounds like a very important topic. Curious to know whether a audio love note would be accepted. What I mean by that is, a recorded conversation between two friends who have been discussing the topic of love in relation to community organizing and anti-oppression work?

    Also, how many submissions are allowed per person?

    Thanks!

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 20, 2013 at 5:19 pm

      Greetings,

      We prefer writings, however, we may consider recorded video chats. However, they have to be uploaded to youtube first.

  29. Jennifer on March 21, 2013 at 2:29 pm

    This sounds great and I’m inclined to submit something. I have to say, though, that what holds me back is noticing who *isn’t* mentioned in the listing of people who should submit “Black, Mujerista, Chicana, African, White, Palestinian, Muslim, Asian, Womanist, and other feminists.” While I appreciate that this is a very short list of the many different feminists who could and should submit, I am saddened by the absence of mention of “Native American,” “American Indian,” “Indigenous” or “Aboriginal” feminists. While these terms are inherently problematic given their broadness, and while feminism and Indigeneity often sit in tense relation to one another for the many reasons you’ve laid out here, the absence of such conscious inclusion nonetheless signals to people that Indigenous women and Indigenous feminisms/feminists remain an afterthought for people (if a thought at all) – and that anti-racist feminisms may not be, indeed, for everybody.

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 21, 2013 at 3:26 pm

      Greetings,
      Thanks for writing. We tried to be as inclusive as possible and we really hope to have a great variety of voices represented. If you are inclined to write, please do. Our intent in naming was to move beyond black and white. This is very dangerous, of course, as we could not name everyone. However, anyone familiar with our site knows that, while we don’t always get it right, we are absolutely about doing work that is inclusive.
      Best,
      TAL

  30. Jennifer on March 21, 2013 at 2:29 pm

    This sounds great and I’m inclined to submit something. I have to say, though, that what holds me back is noticing who *isn’t* mentioned in the listing of people who should submit “Black, Mujerista, Chicana, African, White, Palestinian, Muslim, Asian, Womanist, and other feminists.” While I appreciate that this is a very short list of the many different feminists who could and should submit, I am saddened by the absence of mention of “Native American,” “American Indian,” “Indigenous” or “Aboriginal” feminists. While these terms are inherently problematic given their broadness, and while feminism and Indigeneity often sit in tense relation to one another for the many reasons you’ve laid out here, the absence of such conscious inclusion nonetheless signals to people that Indigenous women and Indigenous feminisms/feminists remain an afterthought for people (if a thought at all) – and that anti-racist feminisms may not be, indeed, for everybody.

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 21, 2013 at 3:26 pm

      Greetings,
      Thanks for writing. We tried to be as inclusive as possible and we really hope to have a great variety of voices represented. If you are inclined to write, please do. Our intent in naming was to move beyond black and white. This is very dangerous, of course, as we could not name everyone. However, anyone familiar with our site knows that, while we don’t always get it right, we are absolutely about doing work that is inclusive.
      Best,
      TAL

  31. Jennifer on March 21, 2013 at 2:29 pm

    This sounds great and I’m inclined to submit something. I have to say, though, that what holds me back is noticing who *isn’t* mentioned in the listing of people who should submit “Black, Mujerista, Chicana, African, White, Palestinian, Muslim, Asian, Womanist, and other feminists.” While I appreciate that this is a very short list of the many different feminists who could and should submit, I am saddened by the absence of mention of “Native American,” “American Indian,” “Indigenous” or “Aboriginal” feminists. While these terms are inherently problematic given their broadness, and while feminism and Indigeneity often sit in tense relation to one another for the many reasons you’ve laid out here, the absence of such conscious inclusion nonetheless signals to people that Indigenous women and Indigenous feminisms/feminists remain an afterthought for people (if a thought at all) – and that anti-racist feminisms may not be, indeed, for everybody.

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 21, 2013 at 3:26 pm

      Greetings,
      Thanks for writing. We tried to be as inclusive as possible and we really hope to have a great variety of voices represented. If you are inclined to write, please do. Our intent in naming was to move beyond black and white. This is very dangerous, of course, as we could not name everyone. However, anyone familiar with our site knows that, while we don’t always get it right, we are absolutely about doing work that is inclusive.
      Best,
      TAL

  32. Jennifer on March 21, 2013 at 2:29 pm

    This sounds great and I’m inclined to submit something. I have to say, though, that what holds me back is noticing who *isn’t* mentioned in the listing of people who should submit “Black, Mujerista, Chicana, African, White, Palestinian, Muslim, Asian, Womanist, and other feminists.” While I appreciate that this is a very short list of the many different feminists who could and should submit, I am saddened by the absence of mention of “Native American,” “American Indian,” “Indigenous” or “Aboriginal” feminists. While these terms are inherently problematic given their broadness, and while feminism and Indigeneity often sit in tense relation to one another for the many reasons you’ve laid out here, the absence of such conscious inclusion nonetheless signals to people that Indigenous women and Indigenous feminisms/feminists remain an afterthought for people (if a thought at all) – and that anti-racist feminisms may not be, indeed, for everybody.

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 21, 2013 at 3:26 pm

      Greetings,
      Thanks for writing. We tried to be as inclusive as possible and we really hope to have a great variety of voices represented. If you are inclined to write, please do. Our intent in naming was to move beyond black and white. This is very dangerous, of course, as we could not name everyone. However, anyone familiar with our site knows that, while we don’t always get it right, we are absolutely about doing work that is inclusive.
      Best,
      TAL

  33. Charlene Sayo on March 27, 2013 at 3:31 am

    Silly question, but what time, on the 31st, are the submissions due? Eastern time or Pacific time?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 27, 2013 at 7:53 am

      EST

  34. Charlene Sayo on March 27, 2013 at 3:31 am

    Silly question, but what time, on the 31st, are the submissions due? Eastern time or Pacific time?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 27, 2013 at 7:53 am

      EST

  35. Charlene Sayo on March 27, 2013 at 3:31 am

    Silly question, but what time, on the 31st, are the submissions due? Eastern time or Pacific time?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 27, 2013 at 7:53 am

      EST

  36. Charlene Sayo on March 27, 2013 at 3:31 am

    Silly question, but what time, on the 31st, are the submissions due? Eastern time or Pacific time?

    • Tamura A. Lomax on March 27, 2013 at 7:53 am

      EST

Follow The Feminist Wire

Arts & Culture

  • Poem Suite: Becoming DSC_0377

    In our Poem Suites, we bring together the voices of emerging and established poets exploring a common theme. In today’s Poem Suite, two poets explore processes of change, motion, and becoming from feminist perspectives.        From “Lesion” By Indrani Sengupta   thereafter   overgrown freckle. overzealous lovemark not [...]

  • Poems by Lisa Ciccarello bio pic fw

    from & if I die, make me how you are     It is the sister inside him that makes him slow.   She writes the psalm he tries to hold her back.   The blade is a proposal: how I stayed inside my sister’s voice.  . . . . [...]

  • Two Poems by Tsitsi Jaji tumblr_m0jjzqsYiq1qbh27fo1_500

    By Tsitsi Jaji   Pause. (For All the Madibas)*   There is a breath before the pendulum rends its center, A breath before what leapt comes back to its ground.     There, men and women in chains broke rock, forcing it to deliver         .   [...]