40 Responses to Walking the “Only” Road: Psychological Tight Spaces

  1. Marsha A. on September 24, 2012 at 6:53 am

    What a vivid picture this paints of a highly complex topic! I want to send this to all the “others” I know. It just might be the trigger that begins their journey of understanding. Thank you!

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  2. Marsha A. on September 24, 2012 at 6:53 am

    What a vivid picture this paints of a highly complex topic! I want to send this to all the “others” I know. It just might be the trigger that begins their journey of understanding. Thank you!

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  3. Marsha A. on September 24, 2012 at 6:53 am

    What a vivid picture this paints of a highly complex topic! I want to send this to all the “others” I know. It just might be the trigger that begins their journey of understanding. Thank you!

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  4. Marsha A. on September 24, 2012 at 6:53 am

    What a vivid picture this paints of a highly complex topic! I want to send this to all the “others” I know. It just might be the trigger that begins their journey of understanding. Thank you!

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  5. Darryl Bullock on September 24, 2012 at 2:25 pm

    What a tremendous article!!!! I have known Dr. Ricks since 85′, meeting her at Penn State. The article is a great article not because I know her but because she is (emotionally) as she described in her article. I can also relate to Shawn and her psychological “tight space” as it has been my own experience my entire life. In a profession (college football coach) that the predominate opportunities go to coaches that don’t look like me, I to thought that I “had been included in the club” as a result of experience, education, and UPBRINGING to only come to the sad conclusion that my “entitlement” was not my reality and probably would never be my reality in my lifetime! Thought provoking article from my friend and scholar.

    Coach Darryl Bullock
    PSU 90′

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  6. Darryl Bullock on September 24, 2012 at 2:25 pm

    What a tremendous article!!!! I have known Dr. Ricks since 85′, meeting her at Penn State. The article is a great article not because I know her but because she is (emotionally) as she described in her article. I can also relate to Shawn and her psychological “tight space” as it has been my own experience my entire life. In a profession (college football coach) that the predominate opportunities go to coaches that don’t look like me, I to thought that I “had been included in the club” as a result of experience, education, and UPBRINGING to only come to the sad conclusion that my “entitlement” was not my reality and probably would never be my reality in my lifetime! Thought provoking article from my friend and scholar.

    Coach Darryl Bullock
    PSU 90′

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  7. Darryl Bullock on September 24, 2012 at 2:25 pm

    What a tremendous article!!!! I have known Dr. Ricks since 85′, meeting her at Penn State. The article is a great article not because I know her but because she is (emotionally) as she described in her article. I can also relate to Shawn and her psychological “tight space” as it has been my own experience my entire life. In a profession (college football coach) that the predominate opportunities go to coaches that don’t look like me, I to thought that I “had been included in the club” as a result of experience, education, and UPBRINGING to only come to the sad conclusion that my “entitlement” was not my reality and probably would never be my reality in my lifetime! Thought provoking article from my friend and scholar.

    Coach Darryl Bullock
    PSU 90′

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  8. Darryl Bullock on September 24, 2012 at 2:25 pm

    What a tremendous article!!!! I have known Dr. Ricks since 85′, meeting her at Penn State. The article is a great article not because I know her but because she is (emotionally) as she described in her article. I can also relate to Shawn and her psychological “tight space” as it has been my own experience my entire life. In a profession (college football coach) that the predominate opportunities go to coaches that don’t look like me, I to thought that I “had been included in the club” as a result of experience, education, and UPBRINGING to only come to the sad conclusion that my “entitlement” was not my reality and probably would never be my reality in my lifetime! Thought provoking article from my friend and scholar.

    Coach Darryl Bullock
    PSU 90′

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  9. Barbara on September 25, 2012 at 4:57 pm

    Off The Cuff = “I soon realized that being thrown into unfamiliar situations with people who cannot understand your lived experiences can weigh heavily on one’s soul.” I’m an African. My skin is light – white – they say. I’m cream from ancestory and my parents. They call me, with disdain, “a liberal”, black and white alike. It hurts my soul when the whites – educated, uneducated, rich or poor stick to a white supremist ideology, use derogatory terms on the basis of the colour of the skin of people I love. Or the kind paternal/maternal religious concern so well appreciated by many of the “previously” oppressed. Yet, I mix with these “whites” – the same people who undermined and sabotaged me under the old “racist regime” for my beliefs. They accept me now with a kind of tolerance, I swell their numbers, disdain at my “misguided” life. My brown friends are more sincere, they have felt the oppression I have suffered. Yet they too disdain me for not having fluorished on the basis of my racial privilege, for my belief born out of that privilege, education and experience. I do not mix with them much- they live too far from my white enclave. I’ve been told by both race groups it would not be safe for me there. I am the odd one out – no extended family, a feminist (not a womanist). Just another lonely odd bod!

    Barbara
    B.A. Gen. Hons Gender Studies (Unitra)

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  10. Barbara on September 25, 2012 at 4:57 pm

    Off The Cuff = “I soon realized that being thrown into unfamiliar situations with people who cannot understand your lived experiences can weigh heavily on one’s soul.” I’m an African. My skin is light – white – they say. I’m cream from ancestory and my parents. They call me, with disdain, “a liberal”, black and white alike. It hurts my soul when the whites – educated, uneducated, rich or poor stick to a white supremist ideology, use derogatory terms on the basis of the colour of the skin of people I love. Or the kind paternal/maternal religious concern so well appreciated by many of the “previously” oppressed. Yet, I mix with these “whites” – the same people who undermined and sabotaged me under the old “racist regime” for my beliefs. They accept me now with a kind of tolerance, I swell their numbers, disdain at my “misguided” life. My brown friends are more sincere, they have felt the oppression I have suffered. Yet they too disdain me for not having fluorished on the basis of my racial privilege, for my belief born out of that privilege, education and experience. I do not mix with them much- they live too far from my white enclave. I’ve been told by both race groups it would not be safe for me there. I am the odd one out – no extended family, a feminist (not a womanist). Just another lonely odd bod!

    Barbara
    B.A. Gen. Hons Gender Studies (Unitra)

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  11. Barbara on September 25, 2012 at 4:57 pm

    Off The Cuff = “I soon realized that being thrown into unfamiliar situations with people who cannot understand your lived experiences can weigh heavily on one’s soul.” I’m an African. My skin is light – white – they say. I’m cream from ancestory and my parents. They call me, with disdain, “a liberal”, black and white alike. It hurts my soul when the whites – educated, uneducated, rich or poor stick to a white supremist ideology, use derogatory terms on the basis of the colour of the skin of people I love. Or the kind paternal/maternal religious concern so well appreciated by many of the “previously” oppressed. Yet, I mix with these “whites” – the same people who undermined and sabotaged me under the old “racist regime” for my beliefs. They accept me now with a kind of tolerance, I swell their numbers, disdain at my “misguided” life. My brown friends are more sincere, they have felt the oppression I have suffered. Yet they too disdain me for not having fluorished on the basis of my racial privilege, for my belief born out of that privilege, education and experience. I do not mix with them much- they live too far from my white enclave. I’ve been told by both race groups it would not be safe for me there. I am the odd one out – no extended family, a feminist (not a womanist). Just another lonely odd bod!

    Barbara
    B.A. Gen. Hons Gender Studies (Unitra)

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  12. Barbara on September 25, 2012 at 4:57 pm

    Off The Cuff = “I soon realized that being thrown into unfamiliar situations with people who cannot understand your lived experiences can weigh heavily on one’s soul.” I’m an African. My skin is light – white – they say. I’m cream from ancestory and my parents. They call me, with disdain, “a liberal”, black and white alike. It hurts my soul when the whites – educated, uneducated, rich or poor stick to a white supremist ideology, use derogatory terms on the basis of the colour of the skin of people I love. Or the kind paternal/maternal religious concern so well appreciated by many of the “previously” oppressed. Yet, I mix with these “whites” – the same people who undermined and sabotaged me under the old “racist regime” for my beliefs. They accept me now with a kind of tolerance, I swell their numbers, disdain at my “misguided” life. My brown friends are more sincere, they have felt the oppression I have suffered. Yet they too disdain me for not having fluorished on the basis of my racial privilege, for my belief born out of that privilege, education and experience. I do not mix with them much- they live too far from my white enclave. I’ve been told by both race groups it would not be safe for me there. I am the odd one out – no extended family, a feminist (not a womanist). Just another lonely odd bod!

    Barbara
    B.A. Gen. Hons Gender Studies (Unitra)

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  13. Forrest Coley on September 26, 2012 at 10:18 am

    You have captured, much better than I ever could, the mere essence of my confusion over the years. While I didn’t have the privelege of the pre college montesorri schools and such, I was still “the only” and did overcome my environment to attend the “predominantly white” university for undergrad and grad. Prior to college, I was the one of the only Blacks in the white class, I was the only Black from my Black neighborhood in the white classes. I had the feeling that I didn’t belong. . .in school and much less in my neighborhood.

    Our exposure has lead us to varied interests where we still experience being the only. I’m so glad to know that I am finally NOT the only one who has to navigate these psychologically tight spaces!

    Thanks for writing this awesome article and I’m proud to say that I know you!

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  14. Forrest Coley on September 26, 2012 at 10:18 am

    You have captured, much better than I ever could, the mere essence of my confusion over the years. While I didn’t have the privelege of the pre college montesorri schools and such, I was still “the only” and did overcome my environment to attend the “predominantly white” university for undergrad and grad. Prior to college, I was the one of the only Blacks in the white class, I was the only Black from my Black neighborhood in the white classes. I had the feeling that I didn’t belong. . .in school and much less in my neighborhood.

    Our exposure has lead us to varied interests where we still experience being the only. I’m so glad to know that I am finally NOT the only one who has to navigate these psychologically tight spaces!

    Thanks for writing this awesome article and I’m proud to say that I know you!

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  15. Forrest Coley on September 26, 2012 at 10:18 am

    You have captured, much better than I ever could, the mere essence of my confusion over the years. While I didn’t have the privelege of the pre college montesorri schools and such, I was still “the only” and did overcome my environment to attend the “predominantly white” university for undergrad and grad. Prior to college, I was the one of the only Blacks in the white class, I was the only Black from my Black neighborhood in the white classes. I had the feeling that I didn’t belong. . .in school and much less in my neighborhood.

    Our exposure has lead us to varied interests where we still experience being the only. I’m so glad to know that I am finally NOT the only one who has to navigate these psychologically tight spaces!

    Thanks for writing this awesome article and I’m proud to say that I know you!

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  16. Forrest Coley on September 26, 2012 at 10:18 am

    You have captured, much better than I ever could, the mere essence of my confusion over the years. While I didn’t have the privelege of the pre college montesorri schools and such, I was still “the only” and did overcome my environment to attend the “predominantly white” university for undergrad and grad. Prior to college, I was the one of the only Blacks in the white class, I was the only Black from my Black neighborhood in the white classes. I had the feeling that I didn’t belong. . .in school and much less in my neighborhood.

    Our exposure has lead us to varied interests where we still experience being the only. I’m so glad to know that I am finally NOT the only one who has to navigate these psychologically tight spaces!

    Thanks for writing this awesome article and I’m proud to say that I know you!

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  17. Lawrence Young on September 26, 2012 at 11:07 pm

    Dr Ricks,
    I couldn’t be prouder. Your expression gives words to what so many African American cannot speak to but experience daily.The hope lies in the following generations whose eyes will be opened and who will discard the mythology of their parents and grandparents. Stay strong

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  18. Lawrence Young on September 26, 2012 at 11:07 pm

    Dr Ricks,
    I couldn’t be prouder. Your expression gives words to what so many African American cannot speak to but experience daily.The hope lies in the following generations whose eyes will be opened and who will discard the mythology of their parents and grandparents. Stay strong

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  19. Lawrence Young on September 26, 2012 at 11:07 pm

    Dr Ricks,
    I couldn’t be prouder. Your expression gives words to what so many African American cannot speak to but experience daily.The hope lies in the following generations whose eyes will be opened and who will discard the mythology of their parents and grandparents. Stay strong

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  20. Lawrence Young on September 26, 2012 at 11:07 pm

    Dr Ricks,
    I couldn’t be prouder. Your expression gives words to what so many African American cannot speak to but experience daily.The hope lies in the following generations whose eyes will be opened and who will discard the mythology of their parents and grandparents. Stay strong

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  21. Josephine Brown on September 27, 2012 at 8:51 am

    Dr. Ricks,
    Your story is a journey. It touches on different emotions. Most of all it screams out to me to continue to be proud of being who I am – acceptance of me is dependent on me and what’s going on inside of me. I love me! If “they” don’t, well that’s “their” problem – I have a saying – “Don’t be angry at me because I am black” – have the pretty brown skin, can talk loud if need be and don’t give a rats tail if “they” like me or not. I am a product of the old South and racism has always been a constant – While it does matter, I refuse to allow It to define who I am.

    We (black people) keep jumping through the hoops trying to gain acceptance from a people who refuse to share and have been known throughout history as takers – I know because I’ve jumped through my share of hoops trying to get the prize (acceptance). I have found that we are often just as hard on each other as other people are. It’s all good though, because I am learning to Love myself and that truly is (aside from love of God) the Greatest Love of All!

    I love all people because I am a PROUD person and no one can take that away from me no matter how much they try through all forms daily igno-grams, comments, character attacks, and the likes. God made me and He knows all about me – that’s truly what matters.

    Your pictures show a beautiful woman. Your writing shows an intelligent woman/person. The bottom line is you have all that you need and more! We can’t ignore the problems of our world – but we must recognize that it’s going to take continuous molding of ourselves and our children to experience true self-love first and then we can get others to know that it would be to their benefit to join us because we will not be beaten down! Continue to plant seeds of love, appreciation, hope, courage, self-control, faith, belief, understanding, acceptance, patience, resilience…(the list continues); plant these in our children and grandchildren – in generations to come the rewards will be bountiful!

    Love God first which permeates to self-love. We glow in the dark!

    Thank you for listening.

    Love & Peace to you and yours!
    J.W. Brown

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  22. Josephine Brown on September 27, 2012 at 8:51 am

    Dr. Ricks,
    Your story is a journey. It touches on different emotions. Most of all it screams out to me to continue to be proud of being who I am – acceptance of me is dependent on me and what’s going on inside of me. I love me! If “they” don’t, well that’s “their” problem – I have a saying – “Don’t be angry at me because I am black” – have the pretty brown skin, can talk loud if need be and don’t give a rats tail if “they” like me or not. I am a product of the old South and racism has always been a constant – While it does matter, I refuse to allow It to define who I am.

    We (black people) keep jumping through the hoops trying to gain acceptance from a people who refuse to share and have been known throughout history as takers – I know because I’ve jumped through my share of hoops trying to get the prize (acceptance). I have found that we are often just as hard on each other as other people are. It’s all good though, because I am learning to Love myself and that truly is (aside from love of God) the Greatest Love of All!

    I love all people because I am a PROUD person and no one can take that away from me no matter how much they try through all forms daily igno-grams, comments, character attacks, and the likes. God made me and He knows all about me – that’s truly what matters.

    Your pictures show a beautiful woman. Your writing shows an intelligent woman/person. The bottom line is you have all that you need and more! We can’t ignore the problems of our world – but we must recognize that it’s going to take continuous molding of ourselves and our children to experience true self-love first and then we can get others to know that it would be to their benefit to join us because we will not be beaten down! Continue to plant seeds of love, appreciation, hope, courage, self-control, faith, belief, understanding, acceptance, patience, resilience…(the list continues); plant these in our children and grandchildren – in generations to come the rewards will be bountiful!

    Love God first which permeates to self-love. We glow in the dark!

    Thank you for listening.

    Love & Peace to you and yours!
    J.W. Brown

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  23. Josephine Brown on September 27, 2012 at 8:51 am

    Dr. Ricks,
    Your story is a journey. It touches on different emotions. Most of all it screams out to me to continue to be proud of being who I am – acceptance of me is dependent on me and what’s going on inside of me. I love me! If “they” don’t, well that’s “their” problem – I have a saying – “Don’t be angry at me because I am black” – have the pretty brown skin, can talk loud if need be and don’t give a rats tail if “they” like me or not. I am a product of the old South and racism has always been a constant – While it does matter, I refuse to allow It to define who I am.

    We (black people) keep jumping through the hoops trying to gain acceptance from a people who refuse to share and have been known throughout history as takers – I know because I’ve jumped through my share of hoops trying to get the prize (acceptance). I have found that we are often just as hard on each other as other people are. It’s all good though, because I am learning to Love myself and that truly is (aside from love of God) the Greatest Love of All!

    I love all people because I am a PROUD person and no one can take that away from me no matter how much they try through all forms daily igno-grams, comments, character attacks, and the likes. God made me and He knows all about me – that’s truly what matters.

    Your pictures show a beautiful woman. Your writing shows an intelligent woman/person. The bottom line is you have all that you need and more! We can’t ignore the problems of our world – but we must recognize that it’s going to take continuous molding of ourselves and our children to experience true self-love first and then we can get others to know that it would be to their benefit to join us because we will not be beaten down! Continue to plant seeds of love, appreciation, hope, courage, self-control, faith, belief, understanding, acceptance, patience, resilience…(the list continues); plant these in our children and grandchildren – in generations to come the rewards will be bountiful!

    Love God first which permeates to self-love. We glow in the dark!

    Thank you for listening.

    Love & Peace to you and yours!
    J.W. Brown

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  24. Josephine Brown on September 27, 2012 at 8:51 am

    Dr. Ricks,
    Your story is a journey. It touches on different emotions. Most of all it screams out to me to continue to be proud of being who I am – acceptance of me is dependent on me and what’s going on inside of me. I love me! If “they” don’t, well that’s “their” problem – I have a saying – “Don’t be angry at me because I am black” – have the pretty brown skin, can talk loud if need be and don’t give a rats tail if “they” like me or not. I am a product of the old South and racism has always been a constant – While it does matter, I refuse to allow It to define who I am.

    We (black people) keep jumping through the hoops trying to gain acceptance from a people who refuse to share and have been known throughout history as takers – I know because I’ve jumped through my share of hoops trying to get the prize (acceptance). I have found that we are often just as hard on each other as other people are. It’s all good though, because I am learning to Love myself and that truly is (aside from love of God) the Greatest Love of All!

    I love all people because I am a PROUD person and no one can take that away from me no matter how much they try through all forms daily igno-grams, comments, character attacks, and the likes. God made me and He knows all about me – that’s truly what matters.

    Your pictures show a beautiful woman. Your writing shows an intelligent woman/person. The bottom line is you have all that you need and more! We can’t ignore the problems of our world – but we must recognize that it’s going to take continuous molding of ourselves and our children to experience true self-love first and then we can get others to know that it would be to their benefit to join us because we will not be beaten down! Continue to plant seeds of love, appreciation, hope, courage, self-control, faith, belief, understanding, acceptance, patience, resilience…(the list continues); plant these in our children and grandchildren – in generations to come the rewards will be bountiful!

    Love God first which permeates to self-love. We glow in the dark!

    Thank you for listening.

    Love & Peace to you and yours!
    J.W. Brown

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  25. Monica J. Casper on September 27, 2012 at 11:27 am

    Thanks for this terrific piece, Shawn! You’ve clearly struck a chord.

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  26. Monica J. Casper on September 27, 2012 at 11:27 am

    Thanks for this terrific piece, Shawn! You’ve clearly struck a chord.

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  27. Monica J. Casper on September 27, 2012 at 11:27 am

    Thanks for this terrific piece, Shawn! You’ve clearly struck a chord.

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  28. Monica J. Casper on September 27, 2012 at 11:27 am

    Thanks for this terrific piece, Shawn! You’ve clearly struck a chord.

    [WORDPRESS HASHCASH] The poster sent us ’0 which is not a hashcash value.

  29. Jewel Cherry on September 28, 2012 at 7:49 pm

    Well done Dr Ricks! A well written and sadly accurate description of what too many of us experience daily. Thank you. It is my pleasure to know you.

    All the best !!

  30. Jewel Cherry on September 28, 2012 at 7:49 pm

    Well done Dr Ricks! A well written and sadly accurate description of what too many of us experience daily. Thank you. It is my pleasure to know you.

    All the best !!

  31. Jewel Cherry on September 28, 2012 at 7:49 pm

    Well done Dr Ricks! A well written and sadly accurate description of what too many of us experience daily. Thank you. It is my pleasure to know you.

    All the best !!

  32. Jewel Cherry on September 28, 2012 at 7:49 pm

    Well done Dr Ricks! A well written and sadly accurate description of what too many of us experience daily. Thank you. It is my pleasure to know you.

    All the best !!

  33. NN on October 2, 2012 at 1:00 am

    White people have an illness. I think the issue you bring up puts so much weight on you and not enough on their reluctance to admit that they have a vapid spirit when it comes to race, honesty, class and judgement. They will soon start to eat away at themselves because they refuse to see their disease and its impact on their humanity. In the meantime, intelligent, smart self assured black women like yourself struggle with these questions that really need to be placed on the white “friends” who find it way too easy to slip back into their soul-less ways.

  34. NN on October 2, 2012 at 1:00 am

    White people have an illness. I think the issue you bring up puts so much weight on you and not enough on their reluctance to admit that they have a vapid spirit when it comes to race, honesty, class and judgement. They will soon start to eat away at themselves because they refuse to see their disease and its impact on their humanity. In the meantime, intelligent, smart self assured black women like yourself struggle with these questions that really need to be placed on the white “friends” who find it way too easy to slip back into their soul-less ways.

  35. NN on October 2, 2012 at 1:00 am

    White people have an illness. I think the issue you bring up puts so much weight on you and not enough on their reluctance to admit that they have a vapid spirit when it comes to race, honesty, class and judgement. They will soon start to eat away at themselves because they refuse to see their disease and its impact on their humanity. In the meantime, intelligent, smart self assured black women like yourself struggle with these questions that really need to be placed on the white “friends” who find it way too easy to slip back into their soul-less ways.

  36. NN on October 2, 2012 at 1:00 am

    White people have an illness. I think the issue you bring up puts so much weight on you and not enough on their reluctance to admit that they have a vapid spirit when it comes to race, honesty, class and judgement. They will soon start to eat away at themselves because they refuse to see their disease and its impact on their humanity. In the meantime, intelligent, smart self assured black women like yourself struggle with these questions that really need to be placed on the white “friends” who find it way too easy to slip back into their soul-less ways.

  37. Brenda Cartwright on October 3, 2012 at 5:00 am

    Wow! What an awesome article full of emotion and awakening!!! Now, where do we go from here?

  38. Brenda Cartwright on October 3, 2012 at 5:00 am

    Wow! What an awesome article full of emotion and awakening!!! Now, where do we go from here?

  39. Brenda Cartwright on October 3, 2012 at 5:00 am

    Wow! What an awesome article full of emotion and awakening!!! Now, where do we go from here?

  40. Brenda Cartwright on October 3, 2012 at 5:00 am

    Wow! What an awesome article full of emotion and awakening!!! Now, where do we go from here?

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