An Open Letter to UConn President Susan Herbst

April 24, 2013
By

Dear President Susan Herbst,

I write to you today as a UConn student, but more specifically as a UConn woman and feminist. I want to first express my admiration for you as a woman who has made it in a “man’s” world, who has faced the odds and done the seemingly unthinkable; become the first woman president at UConn over the course of its 130-year history. You serve as a shining example that even the most challenging of ceilings can be broken, and you speak to the considerable strides women have made over the last 50 years in academia and the professional world. One of the most vivid memories I have of my admiration for your accomplishments was when Gloria Steinem gave you a standing ovation for your successes, along with a full auditorium of students and faculty, during her speech at the 40 year anniversary of the UConn Women’s Center this past fall.  It is on behalf of that standing ovation, my feminist foremothers, and the respect that I feel for your success personally that I write this letter of concern and intervention to you today.

Over the course of the past few weeks, UConn has gradually unveiled its “New University Visual Identity Program” which will make UConn the school’s new “wordmark” with a unified appearance, and will require a change in the Husky Dog logo from its current mascot to a more “powerful and aggressive” looking logo. In your Second State of the University Address, you spoke to the reasoning behind this re-branding and logo change, and these justifications left me overcome by waves of anger and frustration. As a UConn student who is proud of my University’s academics and my future degree, I feel frustrated; as a woman student living at this campus I am outright offended. I am appalled by the selective amnesia these justifications display and angered at the superficiality of this Visual Identity Program.

The updated identity package that will be presented on the 18th, like the wordmark, is intended to show what UConn and our student athletes convey every day: poise, confidence, competitiveness, and the determination to succeed in the classroom and on the field and the court.

The aforementioned was one of the statements made in your address. Here is a timeline of some events that are disturbingly absent from this account of the past year in UConn athletics:

  1. On June 21st 2012, UConn Men’s basketball becomes the first BCS school team to face a postseason ban based solely on low APR (Academic Progress Rate) scores.
  2. On October 6th 2012, Lyle McCombs is arrested on charges of second degree breach of peace for a domestic violence dispute in which he was, “yelling, pushing, and spitting at his girlfriend” during an argument outside a residence hall.
  3. On February 11th 2013, Enosch Wolf is arrested on charges of third degree burglary, first degree criminal trespassing and disorderly conduct when he “refused to leave” a female student’s apartment, “grabbed the hair of the victim and pushed her head” and “knocked the glasses off the victim’s face with his hand.”
  4. On March 21st 2013, Tyler Olander is arrested for trespassing in a structure or conveyance while on Spring Break in Panama City, Florida.

These are serious marks against both our athletic program and our university as a whole — marks that, other than a decision made by Coach Kevin Ollie to suspend Wolf indefinitely, have gone unaddressed, unmentioned, and unacknowledged by UConn authorities. What does this timeline say when juxtaposed with your justification? It beckons the question, what does UConn do with marks like these? The answer appears to be: we turn them blue and shape them into something new.

Instead of giving these problematic aspects of male athletic peer culture at UConn a second look or a giving the real face of athletics a true makeover, it appears that the focus of your administration is prioritizing the remodeling of the fictional face of the Husky Logo. Instead of communicating a zero tolerance atmosphere for this kind of behavior, increasing or vocalizing support to violence against women prevention efforts on campus in the face of such events, or increasing support to student run programs that seek to work with athletes on issues of violence as well as academic issues, it would appear that your administration is more interested in fostering consumerism and corporatization than education and community. Another example of this shift in priorities can be seen in the current administrations selection of the new logo — a selection made with no involvement from or consultation with the normal, everyday, non-Olympian student body:

Contrary to speculation, the Husky will not appear to be mean, snarling, or capable of frightening small children! Instead he will be rendered as the sleek, beautiful animal a real Husky truly is.

Well President Herbst, the new Husky logo may not be capable of frightening small children, but the face of real life UConn athletics is certainly capable of frightening college women.

It is looking right through you and saying, ‘Do not mess with me.’ This is a streamlined, fighting dog, and I cannot wait for it to be on our uniforms and court.~Geno Auriemma stated about the new logo change.

What terrifies me about the admiration of such traits is that I know what it feels like to have a real life Husky look straight through you and to feel powerless, and to wonder if even the administration cannot “mess with them.” And I know I am not alone. It is on this note that I ask you to hear these words.  And whether you hear me or not, I thank you for the ceilings you have shattered that benefit women in academia such as myself. In the words of Audre Lorde, “this letter is in repayment.”

In solidarity,

Carolyn Luby

 

http://president.uconn.edu/wordmark/

http://www.ncaa.org/wps/wcm/connect/public/NCAA/Resources/Latest+News/2011/February/UConn+mens+basketball+program+penalized

http://articles.courant.com/2013-02-11/sports/hc-enosch-wolf-0212-20130211_1_enosch-wolf-uconn-soccer-tyler-olander

http://articles.courant.com/2012-10-06/news/hc-uconn-rb-lyle-mccombs-arrested-friday-to-play-against-rutgers-today-20121006_1_uconn-sophomore-uconn-police-report-rutgers

http://articles.courant.com/2013-03-21/sports/hc-olander-uconn-0322-20130321_1_tyler-olander-uconn-police-enosch-wolf

http://tracking.si.com/2013/04/11/uconn-logo-new-husky-huskies/

http://today.uconn.edu/blog/2013/04/a-new-husky-for-a-new-era/

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/21/nyregion/21uconn.html?_r=2&hpw&

http://www.historyisaweapon.com/defcon1/lordeopenlettertomarydaly.html

_______________________________________

Carolyn Luby is a senior at the University of Connecticut majoring in Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies and Spanish and minoring in Latino/a Studies. She is involved in various different feminist groups and violence against women prevention efforts on campus and has particular interest in global feminisms and anti-imperial anti-colonial feminisms.

 

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164 Responses to An Open Letter to UConn President Susan Herbst

  1. Catherine Morrisey on April 24, 2013 at 9:48 am

    Great article! Thank you for your contribution!

    • Eleanor on April 26, 2013 at 12:31 pm

      If this is the caliber of student at UConn they don’t need a team at all. If this is the caliber of woman being “educated” at UConn every parent there deserves a refund. If this is the caliber of education at UConn it is time to shut down. This is truly pitiful on all fronts. No wonder our country is dying.

  2. Catherine Morrisey on April 24, 2013 at 9:48 am

    Great article! Thank you for your contribution!

    • Eleanor on April 26, 2013 at 12:31 pm

      If this is the caliber of student at UConn they don’t need a team at all. If this is the caliber of woman being “educated” at UConn every parent there deserves a refund. If this is the caliber of education at UConn it is time to shut down. This is truly pitiful on all fronts. No wonder our country is dying.

  3. Catherine Morrisey on April 24, 2013 at 9:48 am

    Great article! Thank you for your contribution!

    • Eleanor on April 26, 2013 at 12:31 pm

      If this is the caliber of student at UConn they don’t need a team at all. If this is the caliber of woman being “educated” at UConn every parent there deserves a refund. If this is the caliber of education at UConn it is time to shut down. This is truly pitiful on all fronts. No wonder our country is dying.

  4. Catherine Morrisey on April 24, 2013 at 9:48 am

    Great article! Thank you for your contribution!

    • Eleanor on April 26, 2013 at 12:31 pm

      If this is the caliber of student at UConn they don’t need a team at all. If this is the caliber of woman being “educated” at UConn every parent there deserves a refund. If this is the caliber of education at UConn it is time to shut down. This is truly pitiful on all fronts. No wonder our country is dying.

  5. justin on April 24, 2013 at 10:40 am

    this is awesome!

  6. justin on April 24, 2013 at 10:40 am

    this is awesome!

  7. justin on April 24, 2013 at 10:40 am

    this is awesome!

  8. justin on April 24, 2013 at 10:40 am

    this is awesome!

  9. Jack on April 24, 2013 at 10:55 am

    Crazy timing. This morning it looks like all charges against Wolf were dropped.
    http://www.courant.com/sports/uconn-men/hc-enosch-wolf-0425-20130425,0,3804421.story

  10. Jack on April 24, 2013 at 10:55 am

    Crazy timing. This morning it looks like all charges against Wolf were dropped.
    http://www.courant.com/sports/uconn-men/hc-enosch-wolf-0425-20130425,0,3804421.story

  11. Jack on April 24, 2013 at 10:55 am

    Crazy timing. This morning it looks like all charges against Wolf were dropped.
    http://www.courant.com/sports/uconn-men/hc-enosch-wolf-0425-20130425,0,3804421.story

  12. Jack on April 24, 2013 at 10:55 am

    Crazy timing. This morning it looks like all charges against Wolf were dropped.
    http://www.courant.com/sports/uconn-men/hc-enosch-wolf-0425-20130425,0,3804421.story

  13. Concerned on April 24, 2013 at 11:48 am

    2 male athletes have had incidents involving women but “the face of real life UConn athletics is certainly capable of frightening college women”??

    Considering the number of student athletes in total that is a miniscule number. This article reeks of an author looking for something to complain about.

    The new branding is necessary for the school’s advancement in college athletics and its desire to become a more marketable franchise, bringing money that would fund the various programs you described.

    UConn has no choice but to participate in these sorts of actions if it wants to keep up. Don’t hate the player, hate the game, etc etc.

    Also the last paragraph is so hilariously dramatic I’d be surprised if Ms. Herbst could read it without laughing.

    • Shella on April 25, 2013 at 11:48 am

      2? There’s more than 2 in the last year alone. The author named more than 2. Someone needs to learn to count. Maybe some folk’s time could be better spent studying instead of on the web commenting on things they don’t understand. The thing is that these athletes are given a pass because they make $$ for the school. That is the way it has always been & unless there are more folks that are against it than there are of folks that don’t care, that’s the way it will always be…

      • Stop on April 25, 2013 at 2:03 pm

        Yes, and one of them was trespassing during spring break, which has NOTHING to do with the rest of the article. Maybe we should air out the authors unrelated dirty laundry for the fun of it. Was what Wolf did stupid? Yes, was it related to this article? No.

        • Earl on April 25, 2013 at 10:10 pm

          Amen, preach on!

      • Charade on April 25, 2013 at 3:49 pm

        If you only read the article, the author only mentions two (2) incidents that she describes as involving women. The incident involving Olander did purportedly involve his girlfriend, but this article makes no mention of that.

        And yes, they get a pass because they make money for the school. The school makes more money from their athletic programs in a single season than you’re likely to make in your lifetime; and that money gets reinvested into education and projects that benefit not only the students, but the state, region, and even nation.

        It’s not that people aren’t against the idea, it’s just that most people understand that life occasionally encourages compromise. If the cost of generating enough income to buy and sell you a dozen times over is a handful of student athletes causing some trouble now and then, then it’s more than acceptable.

  14. Concerned on April 24, 2013 at 11:48 am

    2 male athletes have had incidents involving women but “the face of real life UConn athletics is certainly capable of frightening college women”??

    Considering the number of student athletes in total that is a miniscule number. This article reeks of an author looking for something to complain about.

    The new branding is necessary for the school’s advancement in college athletics and its desire to become a more marketable franchise, bringing money that would fund the various programs you described.

    UConn has no choice but to participate in these sorts of actions if it wants to keep up. Don’t hate the player, hate the game, etc etc.

    Also the last paragraph is so hilariously dramatic I’d be surprised if Ms. Herbst could read it without laughing.

    • Shella on April 25, 2013 at 11:48 am

      2? There’s more than 2 in the last year alone. The author named more than 2. Someone needs to learn to count. Maybe some folk’s time could be better spent studying instead of on the web commenting on things they don’t understand. The thing is that these athletes are given a pass because they make $$ for the school. That is the way it has always been & unless there are more folks that are against it than there are of folks that don’t care, that’s the way it will always be…

      • Stop on April 25, 2013 at 2:03 pm

        Yes, and one of them was trespassing during spring break, which has NOTHING to do with the rest of the article. Maybe we should air out the authors unrelated dirty laundry for the fun of it. Was what Wolf did stupid? Yes, was it related to this article? No.

        • Earl on April 25, 2013 at 10:10 pm

          Amen, preach on!

      • Charade on April 25, 2013 at 3:49 pm

        If you only read the article, the author only mentions two (2) incidents that she describes as involving women. The incident involving Olander did purportedly involve his girlfriend, but this article makes no mention of that.

        And yes, they get a pass because they make money for the school. The school makes more money from their athletic programs in a single season than you’re likely to make in your lifetime; and that money gets reinvested into education and projects that benefit not only the students, but the state, region, and even nation.

        It’s not that people aren’t against the idea, it’s just that most people understand that life occasionally encourages compromise. If the cost of generating enough income to buy and sell you a dozen times over is a handful of student athletes causing some trouble now and then, then it’s more than acceptable.

  15. Concerned on April 24, 2013 at 11:48 am

    2 male athletes have had incidents involving women but “the face of real life UConn athletics is certainly capable of frightening college women”??

    Considering the number of student athletes in total that is a miniscule number. This article reeks of an author looking for something to complain about.

    The new branding is necessary for the school’s advancement in college athletics and its desire to become a more marketable franchise, bringing money that would fund the various programs you described.

    UConn has no choice but to participate in these sorts of actions if it wants to keep up. Don’t hate the player, hate the game, etc etc.

    Also the last paragraph is so hilariously dramatic I’d be surprised if Ms. Herbst could read it without laughing.

    • Shella on April 25, 2013 at 11:48 am

      2? There’s more than 2 in the last year alone. The author named more than 2. Someone needs to learn to count. Maybe some folk’s time could be better spent studying instead of on the web commenting on things they don’t understand. The thing is that these athletes are given a pass because they make $$ for the school. That is the way it has always been & unless there are more folks that are against it than there are of folks that don’t care, that’s the way it will always be…

      • Stop on April 25, 2013 at 2:03 pm

        Yes, and one of them was trespassing during spring break, which has NOTHING to do with the rest of the article. Maybe we should air out the authors unrelated dirty laundry for the fun of it. Was what Wolf did stupid? Yes, was it related to this article? No.

        • Earl on April 25, 2013 at 10:10 pm

          Amen, preach on!

      • Charade on April 25, 2013 at 3:49 pm

        If you only read the article, the author only mentions two (2) incidents that she describes as involving women. The incident involving Olander did purportedly involve his girlfriend, but this article makes no mention of that.

        And yes, they get a pass because they make money for the school. The school makes more money from their athletic programs in a single season than you’re likely to make in your lifetime; and that money gets reinvested into education and projects that benefit not only the students, but the state, region, and even nation.

        It’s not that people aren’t against the idea, it’s just that most people understand that life occasionally encourages compromise. If the cost of generating enough income to buy and sell you a dozen times over is a handful of student athletes causing some trouble now and then, then it’s more than acceptable.

  16. Concerned on April 24, 2013 at 11:48 am

    2 male athletes have had incidents involving women but “the face of real life UConn athletics is certainly capable of frightening college women”??

    Considering the number of student athletes in total that is a miniscule number. This article reeks of an author looking for something to complain about.

    The new branding is necessary for the school’s advancement in college athletics and its desire to become a more marketable franchise, bringing money that would fund the various programs you described.

    UConn has no choice but to participate in these sorts of actions if it wants to keep up. Don’t hate the player, hate the game, etc etc.

    Also the last paragraph is so hilariously dramatic I’d be surprised if Ms. Herbst could read it without laughing.

    • Shella on April 25, 2013 at 11:48 am

      2? There’s more than 2 in the last year alone. The author named more than 2. Someone needs to learn to count. Maybe some folk’s time could be better spent studying instead of on the web commenting on things they don’t understand. The thing is that these athletes are given a pass because they make $$ for the school. That is the way it has always been & unless there are more folks that are against it than there are of folks that don’t care, that’s the way it will always be…

      • Stop on April 25, 2013 at 2:03 pm

        Yes, and one of them was trespassing during spring break, which has NOTHING to do with the rest of the article. Maybe we should air out the authors unrelated dirty laundry for the fun of it. Was what Wolf did stupid? Yes, was it related to this article? No.

        • Earl on April 25, 2013 at 10:10 pm

          Amen, preach on!

      • Charade on April 25, 2013 at 3:49 pm

        If you only read the article, the author only mentions two (2) incidents that she describes as involving women. The incident involving Olander did purportedly involve his girlfriend, but this article makes no mention of that.

        And yes, they get a pass because they make money for the school. The school makes more money from their athletic programs in a single season than you’re likely to make in your lifetime; and that money gets reinvested into education and projects that benefit not only the students, but the state, region, and even nation.

        It’s not that people aren’t against the idea, it’s just that most people understand that life occasionally encourages compromise. If the cost of generating enough income to buy and sell you a dozen times over is a handful of student athletes causing some trouble now and then, then it’s more than acceptable.

  17. Caryl on April 24, 2013 at 12:28 pm

    I appreciate her efforts to process/think through, write out, and express her concern to Pres. Herbst.
    As a fellow feminist from UConn- I stand with you on this!

    • Earl on April 25, 2013 at 11:15 am

      But how does her complaint about how male transgressions are hidden from the world make any sense when the moment Wolf was charged, he was kicked off the team indefinitely? His charges have been dropped, but there is no call on whether he can return to the team or not. Tyler Olander’s little slip up had nothing to do with women or treating men and women differently, correct?

      As far as I heard he was drunk late at night and stumbled onto someone’s boat, no charges filed.

  18. Caryl on April 24, 2013 at 12:28 pm

    I appreciate her efforts to process/think through, write out, and express her concern to Pres. Herbst.
    As a fellow feminist from UConn- I stand with you on this!

    • Earl on April 25, 2013 at 11:15 am

      But how does her complaint about how male transgressions are hidden from the world make any sense when the moment Wolf was charged, he was kicked off the team indefinitely? His charges have been dropped, but there is no call on whether he can return to the team or not. Tyler Olander’s little slip up had nothing to do with women or treating men and women differently, correct?

      As far as I heard he was drunk late at night and stumbled onto someone’s boat, no charges filed.

  19. Caryl on April 24, 2013 at 12:28 pm

    I appreciate her efforts to process/think through, write out, and express her concern to Pres. Herbst.
    As a fellow feminist from UConn- I stand with you on this!

    • Earl on April 25, 2013 at 11:15 am

      But how does her complaint about how male transgressions are hidden from the world make any sense when the moment Wolf was charged, he was kicked off the team indefinitely? His charges have been dropped, but there is no call on whether he can return to the team or not. Tyler Olander’s little slip up had nothing to do with women or treating men and women differently, correct?

      As far as I heard he was drunk late at night and stumbled onto someone’s boat, no charges filed.

  20. Caryl on April 24, 2013 at 12:28 pm

    I appreciate her efforts to process/think through, write out, and express her concern to Pres. Herbst.
    As a fellow feminist from UConn- I stand with you on this!

    • Earl on April 25, 2013 at 11:15 am

      But how does her complaint about how male transgressions are hidden from the world make any sense when the moment Wolf was charged, he was kicked off the team indefinitely? His charges have been dropped, but there is no call on whether he can return to the team or not. Tyler Olander’s little slip up had nothing to do with women or treating men and women differently, correct?

      As far as I heard he was drunk late at night and stumbled onto someone’s boat, no charges filed.

  21. Herp derp on April 24, 2013 at 1:32 pm

    “is more interested in fostering consumerism and corporatization than education and community.”

    It took you this long to realize what goal of all Universities?

  22. Herp derp on April 24, 2013 at 1:32 pm

    “is more interested in fostering consumerism and corporatization than education and community.”

    It took you this long to realize what goal of all Universities?

  23. Herp derp on April 24, 2013 at 1:32 pm

    “is more interested in fostering consumerism and corporatization than education and community.”

    It took you this long to realize what goal of all Universities?

  24. Herp derp on April 24, 2013 at 1:32 pm

    “is more interested in fostering consumerism and corporatization than education and community.”

    It took you this long to realize what goal of all Universities?

  25. Jake on April 24, 2013 at 2:14 pm

    Are you trying to argue that a more intimidating mascot somehow proves the administration’s tacit consent of a couple basketball players’ douchebag behavior? It also seems like you’re writing off power and aggressiveness as purely male traits, as if our womens basketball isnt the most badass, hardcore program in the country. You come off as passive aggressively sexist and lacking any understanding of third wave feminism (hence the Steinem name drop)

  26. Jake on April 24, 2013 at 2:14 pm

    Are you trying to argue that a more intimidating mascot somehow proves the administration’s tacit consent of a couple basketball players’ douchebag behavior? It also seems like you’re writing off power and aggressiveness as purely male traits, as if our womens basketball isnt the most badass, hardcore program in the country. You come off as passive aggressively sexist and lacking any understanding of third wave feminism (hence the Steinem name drop)

  27. Jake on April 24, 2013 at 2:14 pm

    Are you trying to argue that a more intimidating mascot somehow proves the administration’s tacit consent of a couple basketball players’ douchebag behavior? It also seems like you’re writing off power and aggressiveness as purely male traits, as if our womens basketball isnt the most badass, hardcore program in the country. You come off as passive aggressively sexist and lacking any understanding of third wave feminism (hence the Steinem name drop)

  28. Jake on April 24, 2013 at 2:14 pm

    Are you trying to argue that a more intimidating mascot somehow proves the administration’s tacit consent of a couple basketball players’ douchebag behavior? It also seems like you’re writing off power and aggressiveness as purely male traits, as if our womens basketball isnt the most badass, hardcore program in the country. You come off as passive aggressively sexist and lacking any understanding of third wave feminism (hence the Steinem name drop)

  29. Maria Vailakis-Wippick on April 24, 2013 at 2:50 pm

    brilliant article carolyn.
    this is an issue in sports at every college, not just uconn. as the first woman president of uconn, be patient with president herbst. it’s very hard to make changes in the all-boy-network(s). she can’t do it alone. work on getting parent and student body support.
    thank you for your courage in writing this.

  30. Maria Vailakis-Wippick on April 24, 2013 at 2:50 pm

    brilliant article carolyn.
    this is an issue in sports at every college, not just uconn. as the first woman president of uconn, be patient with president herbst. it’s very hard to make changes in the all-boy-network(s). she can’t do it alone. work on getting parent and student body support.
    thank you for your courage in writing this.

  31. Maria Vailakis-Wippick on April 24, 2013 at 2:50 pm

    brilliant article carolyn.
    this is an issue in sports at every college, not just uconn. as the first woman president of uconn, be patient with president herbst. it’s very hard to make changes in the all-boy-network(s). she can’t do it alone. work on getting parent and student body support.
    thank you for your courage in writing this.

  32. Maria Vailakis-Wippick on April 24, 2013 at 2:50 pm

    brilliant article carolyn.
    this is an issue in sports at every college, not just uconn. as the first woman president of uconn, be patient with president herbst. it’s very hard to make changes in the all-boy-network(s). she can’t do it alone. work on getting parent and student body support.
    thank you for your courage in writing this.

  33. Standing With You on April 24, 2013 at 9:40 pm

    Great article. Keep on fighting the good fight.

  34. Standing With You on April 24, 2013 at 9:40 pm

    Great article. Keep on fighting the good fight.

  35. Standing With You on April 24, 2013 at 9:40 pm

    Great article. Keep on fighting the good fight.

  36. Standing With You on April 24, 2013 at 9:40 pm

    Great article. Keep on fighting the good fight.

  37. Andy Vautrin on April 24, 2013 at 9:57 pm

    Although this girl, Carolyn, has some excellent points about the university not doing enough in regards to the incidents involving athletes, she is clearly writing this for the wrong reasons. Her purpose is to get the president of the university to not have the logo be changed to the more agressive one, through justifications that are not justifying at all. Yes, I agree the athletes involved should be reprimanded for their repulsive actions, and I even support a “zero tolerance atmosphere” for this kind of behavior, but that does NOT mean the new logo should make one “outright offended.” Take it up with the athletic program and write a letter as emotional as this one to them because your arguments will actually be valid there. I am completely against all sexist acts towards women in any form, but that, once again, should not be your defense when talking about the new logo for a university, especially one like UCONN. Carolyn gives off the impression that she thinks the logo is being changed because of the face of the athletes, and to almost make up for the bad decisions that have occurred within the athletic program. Clearly, a university would not change their logo for that purpose, it just so happens to be changing in the same year that these events also took place.
    Carolyn’s first quote from the presidents address does not say that the new identity package is intended to show qualities UCONN student athletes solely posses, but UCONN itself too, which obviously includes the majority of students that are not athletes. Carolyn jumped to conclusions as an excuse to fight something that did not personally appeal to her. I still am not sure why she does not like the new logo because it is meant to represent her and the rest of the non-athlete students as being powerful, poised, confident, and competitive, not just the student athletes. If she is truly proud of her university’s academics, she would not be arguing against the fact that they, and the students involved (athlete or non-athlete), display these admirable qualities.
    Yes I go to Quinnipiac, and yes I am a male, but if she thinks my statement above is invalid for lack of understanding where she (females) come from, doesn’t that make Carolyn rude and sexist herself? I was actually not sure how I felt about the new logo myself before I realized what it was trying to represent. Even being from Connecticut and being used to the old logo, after knowing its meaning I fully support the new change.
    To Jake who commented earlier this afternoon, I completely agree with the last two sentences in your comment.
    I could go on for longer but I have some homework to do so please let me know if you also think she is being very narrow-minded about the situation and is almost using this as an excuse to rebel against male “power.”

  38. Andy Vautrin on April 24, 2013 at 9:57 pm

    Although this girl, Carolyn, has some excellent points about the university not doing enough in regards to the incidents involving athletes, she is clearly writing this for the wrong reasons. Her purpose is to get the president of the university to not have the logo be changed to the more agressive one, through justifications that are not justifying at all. Yes, I agree the athletes involved should be reprimanded for their repulsive actions, and I even support a “zero tolerance atmosphere” for this kind of behavior, but that does NOT mean the new logo should make one “outright offended.” Take it up with the athletic program and write a letter as emotional as this one to them because your arguments will actually be valid there. I am completely against all sexist acts towards women in any form, but that, once again, should not be your defense when talking about the new logo for a university, especially one like UCONN. Carolyn gives off the impression that she thinks the logo is being changed because of the face of the athletes, and to almost make up for the bad decisions that have occurred within the athletic program. Clearly, a university would not change their logo for that purpose, it just so happens to be changing in the same year that these events also took place.
    Carolyn’s first quote from the presidents address does not say that the new identity package is intended to show qualities UCONN student athletes solely posses, but UCONN itself too, which obviously includes the majority of students that are not athletes. Carolyn jumped to conclusions as an excuse to fight something that did not personally appeal to her. I still am not sure why she does not like the new logo because it is meant to represent her and the rest of the non-athlete students as being powerful, poised, confident, and competitive, not just the student athletes. If she is truly proud of her university’s academics, she would not be arguing against the fact that they, and the students involved (athlete or non-athlete), display these admirable qualities.
    Yes I go to Quinnipiac, and yes I am a male, but if she thinks my statement above is invalid for lack of understanding where she (females) come from, doesn’t that make Carolyn rude and sexist herself? I was actually not sure how I felt about the new logo myself before I realized what it was trying to represent. Even being from Connecticut and being used to the old logo, after knowing its meaning I fully support the new change.
    To Jake who commented earlier this afternoon, I completely agree with the last two sentences in your comment.
    I could go on for longer but I have some homework to do so please let me know if you also think she is being very narrow-minded about the situation and is almost using this as an excuse to rebel against male “power.”

  39. Andy Vautrin on April 24, 2013 at 9:57 pm

    Although this girl, Carolyn, has some excellent points about the university not doing enough in regards to the incidents involving athletes, she is clearly writing this for the wrong reasons. Her purpose is to get the president of the university to not have the logo be changed to the more agressive one, through justifications that are not justifying at all. Yes, I agree the athletes involved should be reprimanded for their repulsive actions, and I even support a “zero tolerance atmosphere” for this kind of behavior, but that does NOT mean the new logo should make one “outright offended.” Take it up with the athletic program and write a letter as emotional as this one to them because your arguments will actually be valid there. I am completely against all sexist acts towards women in any form, but that, once again, should not be your defense when talking about the new logo for a university, especially one like UCONN. Carolyn gives off the impression that she thinks the logo is being changed because of the face of the athletes, and to almost make up for the bad decisions that have occurred within the athletic program. Clearly, a university would not change their logo for that purpose, it just so happens to be changing in the same year that these events also took place.
    Carolyn’s first quote from the presidents address does not say that the new identity package is intended to show qualities UCONN student athletes solely posses, but UCONN itself too, which obviously includes the majority of students that are not athletes. Carolyn jumped to conclusions as an excuse to fight something that did not personally appeal to her. I still am not sure why she does not like the new logo because it is meant to represent her and the rest of the non-athlete students as being powerful, poised, confident, and competitive, not just the student athletes. If she is truly proud of her university’s academics, she would not be arguing against the fact that they, and the students involved (athlete or non-athlete), display these admirable qualities.
    Yes I go to Quinnipiac, and yes I am a male, but if she thinks my statement above is invalid for lack of understanding where she (females) come from, doesn’t that make Carolyn rude and sexist herself? I was actually not sure how I felt about the new logo myself before I realized what it was trying to represent. Even being from Connecticut and being used to the old logo, after knowing its meaning I fully support the new change.
    To Jake who commented earlier this afternoon, I completely agree with the last two sentences in your comment.
    I could go on for longer but I have some homework to do so please let me know if you also think she is being very narrow-minded about the situation and is almost using this as an excuse to rebel against male “power.”

  40. Andy Vautrin on April 24, 2013 at 9:57 pm

    Although this girl, Carolyn, has some excellent points about the university not doing enough in regards to the incidents involving athletes, she is clearly writing this for the wrong reasons. Her purpose is to get the president of the university to not have the logo be changed to the more agressive one, through justifications that are not justifying at all. Yes, I agree the athletes involved should be reprimanded for their repulsive actions, and I even support a “zero tolerance atmosphere” for this kind of behavior, but that does NOT mean the new logo should make one “outright offended.” Take it up with the athletic program and write a letter as emotional as this one to them because your arguments will actually be valid there. I am completely against all sexist acts towards women in any form, but that, once again, should not be your defense when talking about the new logo for a university, especially one like UCONN. Carolyn gives off the impression that she thinks the logo is being changed because of the face of the athletes, and to almost make up for the bad decisions that have occurred within the athletic program. Clearly, a university would not change their logo for that purpose, it just so happens to be changing in the same year that these events also took place.
    Carolyn’s first quote from the presidents address does not say that the new identity package is intended to show qualities UCONN student athletes solely posses, but UCONN itself too, which obviously includes the majority of students that are not athletes. Carolyn jumped to conclusions as an excuse to fight something that did not personally appeal to her. I still am not sure why she does not like the new logo because it is meant to represent her and the rest of the non-athlete students as being powerful, poised, confident, and competitive, not just the student athletes. If she is truly proud of her university’s academics, she would not be arguing against the fact that they, and the students involved (athlete or non-athlete), display these admirable qualities.
    Yes I go to Quinnipiac, and yes I am a male, but if she thinks my statement above is invalid for lack of understanding where she (females) come from, doesn’t that make Carolyn rude and sexist herself? I was actually not sure how I felt about the new logo myself before I realized what it was trying to represent. Even being from Connecticut and being used to the old logo, after knowing its meaning I fully support the new change.
    To Jake who commented earlier this afternoon, I completely agree with the last two sentences in your comment.
    I could go on for longer but I have some homework to do so please let me know if you also think she is being very narrow-minded about the situation and is almost using this as an excuse to rebel against male “power.”

  41. Pam Shorey on April 24, 2013 at 11:28 pm

    I wish UConn would reduce its emphasis on celebrity athletics and focus on producing well-rounded students, providing a variety of athletic activities, including a fitness center. I was quite surprised to read that if students want a suitable exercise facility, they have to fund its *construction* themselves through student excessive activity fees. I urge you to go back to the Legislature for this. The State of Connecticut needs do much better for its university students.

  42. Pam Shorey on April 24, 2013 at 11:28 pm

    I wish UConn would reduce its emphasis on celebrity athletics and focus on producing well-rounded students, providing a variety of athletic activities, including a fitness center. I was quite surprised to read that if students want a suitable exercise facility, they have to fund its *construction* themselves through student excessive activity fees. I urge you to go back to the Legislature for this. The State of Connecticut needs do much better for its university students.

  43. Pam Shorey on April 24, 2013 at 11:28 pm

    I wish UConn would reduce its emphasis on celebrity athletics and focus on producing well-rounded students, providing a variety of athletic activities, including a fitness center. I was quite surprised to read that if students want a suitable exercise facility, they have to fund its *construction* themselves through student excessive activity fees. I urge you to go back to the Legislature for this. The State of Connecticut needs do much better for its university students.

  44. Pam Shorey on April 24, 2013 at 11:28 pm

    I wish UConn would reduce its emphasis on celebrity athletics and focus on producing well-rounded students, providing a variety of athletic activities, including a fitness center. I was quite surprised to read that if students want a suitable exercise facility, they have to fund its *construction* themselves through student excessive activity fees. I urge you to go back to the Legislature for this. The State of Connecticut needs do much better for its university students.

  45. Bill on April 25, 2013 at 12:23 pm

    57% of college students are women, but yeah, so far you’ve made it in a “man’s world” and beat the odds.

    • Rob on April 25, 2013 at 10:06 pm

      Way to go, you completely misrepresented what she said. Although I don’t agree with everything the author wrote here, if you don’t think that a woman becoming president of a school like UConn is a big deal, you need a history lesson. Sure, the tides are turning now and many of the barriers have been broken but give me a break, you act as if she was talking about herself.

  46. Bill on April 25, 2013 at 12:23 pm

    57% of college students are women, but yeah, so far you’ve made it in a “man’s world” and beat the odds.

    • Rob on April 25, 2013 at 10:06 pm

      Way to go, you completely misrepresented what she said. Although I don’t agree with everything the author wrote here, if you don’t think that a woman becoming president of a school like UConn is a big deal, you need a history lesson. Sure, the tides are turning now and many of the barriers have been broken but give me a break, you act as if she was talking about herself.

  47. Bill on April 25, 2013 at 12:23 pm

    57% of college students are women, but yeah, so far you’ve made it in a “man’s world” and beat the odds.

    • Rob on April 25, 2013 at 10:06 pm

      Way to go, you completely misrepresented what she said. Although I don’t agree with everything the author wrote here, if you don’t think that a woman becoming president of a school like UConn is a big deal, you need a history lesson. Sure, the tides are turning now and many of the barriers have been broken but give me a break, you act as if she was talking about herself.

  48. Bill on April 25, 2013 at 12:23 pm

    57% of college students are women, but yeah, so far you’ve made it in a “man’s world” and beat the odds.

    • Rob on April 25, 2013 at 10:06 pm

      Way to go, you completely misrepresented what she said. Although I don’t agree with everything the author wrote here, if you don’t think that a woman becoming president of a school like UConn is a big deal, you need a history lesson. Sure, the tides are turning now and many of the barriers have been broken but give me a break, you act as if she was talking about herself.

  49. Greg on April 25, 2013 at 4:43 pm

    Time to get off the soap box. It’s a drawing of a cartoon wolf. It doesn’t symbolize rape, any more than one guy beating on his girlfriend means that all men beat their girlfriends. I understand the concern about action not being taken with these players who quite frankly, acted like idiots. But, this symbol is for the entire university, not just the men. Women do play sports at UConn right? Okay, thought so. And they aren’t getting, like a female wolf that doesn’t look so threatening right? Okay, thought so too. My thought it basically that you’re trying to make something out of nothing. If you have a problem with male athletes getting out of control and abusing women and not getting reprimanded for it, keep on fighting. But don’t make it about a logo. Especially when said logo will represent the entire sports program of the whole school, women included. And women in sports, as far as I know, want to go out there and kick some serious butt too.

  50. Greg on April 25, 2013 at 4:43 pm

    Time to get off the soap box. It’s a drawing of a cartoon wolf. It doesn’t symbolize rape, any more than one guy beating on his girlfriend means that all men beat their girlfriends. I understand the concern about action not being taken with these players who quite frankly, acted like idiots. But, this symbol is for the entire university, not just the men. Women do play sports at UConn right? Okay, thought so. And they aren’t getting, like a female wolf that doesn’t look so threatening right? Okay, thought so too. My thought it basically that you’re trying to make something out of nothing. If you have a problem with male athletes getting out of control and abusing women and not getting reprimanded for it, keep on fighting. But don’t make it about a logo. Especially when said logo will represent the entire sports program of the whole school, women included. And women in sports, as far as I know, want to go out there and kick some serious butt too.

  51. Greg on April 25, 2013 at 4:43 pm

    Time to get off the soap box. It’s a drawing of a cartoon wolf. It doesn’t symbolize rape, any more than one guy beating on his girlfriend means that all men beat their girlfriends. I understand the concern about action not being taken with these players who quite frankly, acted like idiots. But, this symbol is for the entire university, not just the men. Women do play sports at UConn right? Okay, thought so. And they aren’t getting, like a female wolf that doesn’t look so threatening right? Okay, thought so too. My thought it basically that you’re trying to make something out of nothing. If you have a problem with male athletes getting out of control and abusing women and not getting reprimanded for it, keep on fighting. But don’t make it about a logo. Especially when said logo will represent the entire sports program of the whole school, women included. And women in sports, as far as I know, want to go out there and kick some serious butt too.

  52. Greg on April 25, 2013 at 4:43 pm

    Time to get off the soap box. It’s a drawing of a cartoon wolf. It doesn’t symbolize rape, any more than one guy beating on his girlfriend means that all men beat their girlfriends. I understand the concern about action not being taken with these players who quite frankly, acted like idiots. But, this symbol is for the entire university, not just the men. Women do play sports at UConn right? Okay, thought so. And they aren’t getting, like a female wolf that doesn’t look so threatening right? Okay, thought so too. My thought it basically that you’re trying to make something out of nothing. If you have a problem with male athletes getting out of control and abusing women and not getting reprimanded for it, keep on fighting. But don’t make it about a logo. Especially when said logo will represent the entire sports program of the whole school, women included. And women in sports, as far as I know, want to go out there and kick some serious butt too.

  53. Longtime UConn Prof on April 25, 2013 at 5:03 pm

    “Although this girl, Carolyn,…” Seriously? I haven’t been a “girl” since the age of 12, and neither has the author of this article. It’s the 21st century, last I heard. That said, yes, our big-time athletics bring in a lot of money. And they spend even more. A little research will bear that out. Many academic units on campus never see a drop of any sort of money athletics “bring in.” I should know, as a fifteen year, tenured, full professor on this campus. What is enormously disappointing about this new re-branding of the University is the adoption of the sports programs’ Nike-designed “word mark” to stand for the entire institution. It’s official. We are nothing but a sports school now. Academic pursuits be damned. President Herbst is as seduced by media attention and dollar-signs as anyone else. But, somehow, I expected more from her. I guess I shouldn’t have.

    • John on April 26, 2013 at 11:16 am

      Men’s basketball and football actually profit and offset the losses of all the other sports at UConn, so I would direct your hatred towards them. We get it, like every other liberal arts professor, you dislike the big sports programs. Regardless of your opinion, they are one of the major reasons this school has turned around its academic reputation and gone from a minor regional name to a national brand. Myself and many of my friends were accepted into better academic schools and chose to come to UConn because of the basketball team and the kind of school spirit and sense of community it fosters.

  54. Longtime UConn Prof on April 25, 2013 at 5:03 pm

    “Although this girl, Carolyn,…” Seriously? I haven’t been a “girl” since the age of 12, and neither has the author of this article. It’s the 21st century, last I heard. That said, yes, our big-time athletics bring in a lot of money. And they spend even more. A little research will bear that out. Many academic units on campus never see a drop of any sort of money athletics “bring in.” I should know, as a fifteen year, tenured, full professor on this campus. What is enormously disappointing about this new re-branding of the University is the adoption of the sports programs’ Nike-designed “word mark” to stand for the entire institution. It’s official. We are nothing but a sports school now. Academic pursuits be damned. President Herbst is as seduced by media attention and dollar-signs as anyone else. But, somehow, I expected more from her. I guess I shouldn’t have.

    • John on April 26, 2013 at 11:16 am

      Men’s basketball and football actually profit and offset the losses of all the other sports at UConn, so I would direct your hatred towards them. We get it, like every other liberal arts professor, you dislike the big sports programs. Regardless of your opinion, they are one of the major reasons this school has turned around its academic reputation and gone from a minor regional name to a national brand. Myself and many of my friends were accepted into better academic schools and chose to come to UConn because of the basketball team and the kind of school spirit and sense of community it fosters.

  55. Longtime UConn Prof on April 25, 2013 at 5:03 pm

    “Although this girl, Carolyn,…” Seriously? I haven’t been a “girl” since the age of 12, and neither has the author of this article. It’s the 21st century, last I heard. That said, yes, our big-time athletics bring in a lot of money. And they spend even more. A little research will bear that out. Many academic units on campus never see a drop of any sort of money athletics “bring in.” I should know, as a fifteen year, tenured, full professor on this campus. What is enormously disappointing about this new re-branding of the University is the adoption of the sports programs’ Nike-designed “word mark” to stand for the entire institution. It’s official. We are nothing but a sports school now. Academic pursuits be damned. President Herbst is as seduced by media attention and dollar-signs as anyone else. But, somehow, I expected more from her. I guess I shouldn’t have.

    • John on April 26, 2013 at 11:16 am

      Men’s basketball and football actually profit and offset the losses of all the other sports at UConn, so I would direct your hatred towards them. We get it, like every other liberal arts professor, you dislike the big sports programs. Regardless of your opinion, they are one of the major reasons this school has turned around its academic reputation and gone from a minor regional name to a national brand. Myself and many of my friends were accepted into better academic schools and chose to come to UConn because of the basketball team and the kind of school spirit and sense of community it fosters.

  56. Longtime UConn Prof on April 25, 2013 at 5:03 pm

    “Although this girl, Carolyn,…” Seriously? I haven’t been a “girl” since the age of 12, and neither has the author of this article. It’s the 21st century, last I heard. That said, yes, our big-time athletics bring in a lot of money. And they spend even more. A little research will bear that out. Many academic units on campus never see a drop of any sort of money athletics “bring in.” I should know, as a fifteen year, tenured, full professor on this campus. What is enormously disappointing about this new re-branding of the University is the adoption of the sports programs’ Nike-designed “word mark” to stand for the entire institution. It’s official. We are nothing but a sports school now. Academic pursuits be damned. President Herbst is as seduced by media attention and dollar-signs as anyone else. But, somehow, I expected more from her. I guess I shouldn’t have.

    • John on April 26, 2013 at 11:16 am

      Men’s basketball and football actually profit and offset the losses of all the other sports at UConn, so I would direct your hatred towards them. We get it, like every other liberal arts professor, you dislike the big sports programs. Regardless of your opinion, they are one of the major reasons this school has turned around its academic reputation and gone from a minor regional name to a national brand. Myself and many of my friends were accepted into better academic schools and chose to come to UConn because of the basketball team and the kind of school spirit and sense of community it fosters.

  57. Stephanie on April 25, 2013 at 10:53 pm

    Thank you Carolyn! I know you are getting a lot of backlash, but as a former Uconn woman, I support you! We should not be afraid to be broad and condemn all aspects of rape culture at Uconn, not only the actions of the athletes, although they are more public. Sexual assault is rampant at Uconn and we cannot ignore it any longer!

  58. Stephanie on April 25, 2013 at 10:53 pm

    Thank you Carolyn! I know you are getting a lot of backlash, but as a former Uconn woman, I support you! We should not be afraid to be broad and condemn all aspects of rape culture at Uconn, not only the actions of the athletes, although they are more public. Sexual assault is rampant at Uconn and we cannot ignore it any longer!

  59. Stephanie on April 25, 2013 at 10:53 pm

    Thank you Carolyn! I know you are getting a lot of backlash, but as a former Uconn woman, I support you! We should not be afraid to be broad and condemn all aspects of rape culture at Uconn, not only the actions of the athletes, although they are more public. Sexual assault is rampant at Uconn and we cannot ignore it any longer!

  60. Stephanie on April 25, 2013 at 10:53 pm

    Thank you Carolyn! I know you are getting a lot of backlash, but as a former Uconn woman, I support you! We should not be afraid to be broad and condemn all aspects of rape culture at Uconn, not only the actions of the athletes, although they are more public. Sexual assault is rampant at Uconn and we cannot ignore it any longer!

  61. aiw on April 26, 2013 at 10:48 am

    I’m a PhD candidate at UConn. As a woman, a feminist, and a scholar, I often feel saddened and ashamed being affiliated with a university that is so corporatized and steeped in misogyny. You, however, make me proud to be a Husky, Carolyn! Thank you for speaking out!

  62. aiw on April 26, 2013 at 10:48 am

    I’m a PhD candidate at UConn. As a woman, a feminist, and a scholar, I often feel saddened and ashamed being affiliated with a university that is so corporatized and steeped in misogyny. You, however, make me proud to be a Husky, Carolyn! Thank you for speaking out!

  63. aiw on April 26, 2013 at 10:48 am

    I’m a PhD candidate at UConn. As a woman, a feminist, and a scholar, I often feel saddened and ashamed being affiliated with a university that is so corporatized and steeped in misogyny. You, however, make me proud to be a Husky, Carolyn! Thank you for speaking out!

  64. aiw on April 26, 2013 at 10:48 am

    I’m a PhD candidate at UConn. As a woman, a feminist, and a scholar, I often feel saddened and ashamed being affiliated with a university that is so corporatized and steeped in misogyny. You, however, make me proud to be a Husky, Carolyn! Thank you for speaking out!

  65. John on April 26, 2013 at 10:59 am

    Wolf was suspended indefinitely the day after he was arrested. He missed the entire end of the season and although he is going through a diversionary program, he has yet to be reinstated to the basketball team.

    McCombs was also suspended for ten weeks after his arrest in which, by the way, his girlfriend was also arrested for the same exact charge.

    Tyler Olander’s arrest had absolutely nothing to do with anything about this article.

    If you’re going to write such a scathing post, I would at least present all the facts and circumstances. By no means am I justifying what any of them did, but they went through the justice system, had to learn from the experience, and the university did not turn a blind eye as this post makes it seem.

  66. John on April 26, 2013 at 10:59 am

    Wolf was suspended indefinitely the day after he was arrested. He missed the entire end of the season and although he is going through a diversionary program, he has yet to be reinstated to the basketball team.

    McCombs was also suspended for ten weeks after his arrest in which, by the way, his girlfriend was also arrested for the same exact charge.

    Tyler Olander’s arrest had absolutely nothing to do with anything about this article.

    If you’re going to write such a scathing post, I would at least present all the facts and circumstances. By no means am I justifying what any of them did, but they went through the justice system, had to learn from the experience, and the university did not turn a blind eye as this post makes it seem.

  67. John on April 26, 2013 at 10:59 am

    Wolf was suspended indefinitely the day after he was arrested. He missed the entire end of the season and although he is going through a diversionary program, he has yet to be reinstated to the basketball team.

    McCombs was also suspended for ten weeks after his arrest in which, by the way, his girlfriend was also arrested for the same exact charge.

    Tyler Olander’s arrest had absolutely nothing to do with anything about this article.

    If you’re going to write such a scathing post, I would at least present all the facts and circumstances. By no means am I justifying what any of them did, but they went through the justice system, had to learn from the experience, and the university did not turn a blind eye as this post makes it seem.

  68. John on April 26, 2013 at 10:59 am

    Wolf was suspended indefinitely the day after he was arrested. He missed the entire end of the season and although he is going through a diversionary program, he has yet to be reinstated to the basketball team.

    McCombs was also suspended for ten weeks after his arrest in which, by the way, his girlfriend was also arrested for the same exact charge.

    Tyler Olander’s arrest had absolutely nothing to do with anything about this article.

    If you’re going to write such a scathing post, I would at least present all the facts and circumstances. By no means am I justifying what any of them did, but they went through the justice system, had to learn from the experience, and the university did not turn a blind eye as this post makes it seem.

  69. Tamura A. Lomax on April 26, 2013 at 11:49 am
  70. Tamura A. Lomax on April 26, 2013 at 11:49 am
  71. Tamura A. Lomax on April 26, 2013 at 11:49 am
  72. Tamura A. Lomax on April 26, 2013 at 11:49 am
  73. A UConn athlete who stands with you on April 26, 2013 at 11:55 am

    Carolyn, thank you so much for writing this letter. You bring up a very important problem, and I admire your courage for speaking up in such a hostile environment. The backlash you have received for your letter just acts as proof of a rampant rape culture. I am a UConn athlete myself, and could not agree more with the points you made. Any UConn athlete, fan, student, or other member of the community who is offended by your letter has some serious self-reflection to do. What is more important; the safety of women on campus or preserving the image of UConn as a brand after incidents of domestic violence? It is clear which side the administration has taken, and I thank you for speaking up and challenging their position.

  74. A UConn athlete who stands with you on April 26, 2013 at 11:55 am

    Carolyn, thank you so much for writing this letter. You bring up a very important problem, and I admire your courage for speaking up in such a hostile environment. The backlash you have received for your letter just acts as proof of a rampant rape culture. I am a UConn athlete myself, and could not agree more with the points you made. Any UConn athlete, fan, student, or other member of the community who is offended by your letter has some serious self-reflection to do. What is more important; the safety of women on campus or preserving the image of UConn as a brand after incidents of domestic violence? It is clear which side the administration has taken, and I thank you for speaking up and challenging their position.

  75. A UConn athlete who stands with you on April 26, 2013 at 11:55 am

    Carolyn, thank you so much for writing this letter. You bring up a very important problem, and I admire your courage for speaking up in such a hostile environment. The backlash you have received for your letter just acts as proof of a rampant rape culture. I am a UConn athlete myself, and could not agree more with the points you made. Any UConn athlete, fan, student, or other member of the community who is offended by your letter has some serious self-reflection to do. What is more important; the safety of women on campus or preserving the image of UConn as a brand after incidents of domestic violence? It is clear which side the administration has taken, and I thank you for speaking up and challenging their position.

  76. A UConn athlete who stands with you on April 26, 2013 at 11:55 am

    Carolyn, thank you so much for writing this letter. You bring up a very important problem, and I admire your courage for speaking up in such a hostile environment. The backlash you have received for your letter just acts as proof of a rampant rape culture. I am a UConn athlete myself, and could not agree more with the points you made. Any UConn athlete, fan, student, or other member of the community who is offended by your letter has some serious self-reflection to do. What is more important; the safety of women on campus or preserving the image of UConn as a brand after incidents of domestic violence? It is clear which side the administration has taken, and I thank you for speaking up and challenging their position.

  77. Heidi R. Lewis on April 26, 2013 at 12:35 pm

    Carolyn, you are SMART and you are BRAVE. Thank you SO much for your voice. It IS appreciated. We love you, and we support you. We have your back. Hatred and stupidity will not prevail. I send you all of the love, warmth, and light that I have in me…today and everyday.

  78. Heidi R. Lewis on April 26, 2013 at 12:35 pm

    Carolyn, you are SMART and you are BRAVE. Thank you SO much for your voice. It IS appreciated. We love you, and we support you. We have your back. Hatred and stupidity will not prevail. I send you all of the love, warmth, and light that I have in me…today and everyday.

  79. Heidi R. Lewis on April 26, 2013 at 12:35 pm

    Carolyn, you are SMART and you are BRAVE. Thank you SO much for your voice. It IS appreciated. We love you, and we support you. We have your back. Hatred and stupidity will not prevail. I send you all of the love, warmth, and light that I have in me…today and everyday.

  80. Heidi R. Lewis on April 26, 2013 at 12:35 pm

    Carolyn, you are SMART and you are BRAVE. Thank you SO much for your voice. It IS appreciated. We love you, and we support you. We have your back. Hatred and stupidity will not prevail. I send you all of the love, warmth, and light that I have in me…today and everyday.

  81. [...] an open letter to UC President Susan Herbst, self-described feminist student Carolyn Luby wrote that the redesigned team logo will intimidate women and empower rape [...]

  82. [...] an open letter to UC President Susan Herbst, self-described feminist student Carolyn Luby wrote that the redesigned team logo will intimidate women and empower rape [...]

  83. [...] an open letter to UC President Susan Herbst, self-described feminist student Carolyn Luby wrote that the redesigned team logo will intimidate women and empower rape [...]

  84. [...] an open letter to UC President Susan Herbst, self-described feminist student Carolyn Luby wrote that the redesigned team logo will intimidate women and empower rape [...]

  85. [...] An Open Letter to UConn President Susan Herbst [...]

  86. [...] An Open Letter to UConn President Susan Herbst [...]

  87. [...] An Open Letter to UConn President Susan Herbst [...]

  88. [...] An Open Letter to UConn President Susan Herbst [...]

  89. [...] days ago, Carolyn Luby, an undergraduate at University of Connecticut published a remarkable open letter to the school’s president,  Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire.  In the letter she made her case and argued persuasively [...]

  90. [...] days ago, Carolyn Luby, an undergraduate at University of Connecticut published a remarkable open letter to the school’s president,  Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire.  In the letter she made her case and argued persuasively [...]

  91. [...] days ago, Carolyn Luby, an undergraduate at University of Connecticut published a remarkable open letter to the school’s president,  Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire.  In the letter she made her case and argued persuasively [...]

  92. [...] days ago, Carolyn Luby, an undergraduate at University of Connecticut published a remarkable open letter to the school’s president,  Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire.  In the letter she made her case and argued persuasively [...]

  93. [...] Luby wrote a letter to the Uconn president Susan Herbst. It regards the new logo of the husky mascot of the school and posits that the administration of [...]

  94. [...] Luby wrote a letter to the Uconn president Susan Herbst. It regards the new logo of the husky mascot of the school and posits that the administration of [...]

  95. [...] Luby wrote a letter to the Uconn president Susan Herbst. It regards the new logo of the husky mascot of the school and posits that the administration of [...]

  96. [...] Luby wrote a letter to the Uconn president Susan Herbst. It regards the new logo of the husky mascot of the school and posits that the administration of [...]

  97. [...] Instapundit calls our attention to the case of a feminist student at the University of Connecticut who saw rape in the school’s revamped logo for its Huskies sports program. And to understand just what this reaction means, you really should read the “open letter” that Carolyn Luby wrote to UConn president Susan Herbst: [...]

  98. [...] Instapundit calls our attention to the case of a feminist student at the University of Connecticut who saw rape in the school’s revamped logo for its Huskies sports program. And to understand just what this reaction means, you really should read the “open letter” that Carolyn Luby wrote to UConn president Susan Herbst: [...]

  99. [...] Instapundit calls our attention to the case of a feminist student at the University of Connecticut who saw rape in the school’s revamped logo for its Huskies sports program. And to understand just what this reaction means, you really should read the “open letter” that Carolyn Luby wrote to UConn president Susan Herbst: [...]

  100. [...] Instapundit calls our attention to the case of a feminist student at the University of Connecticut who saw rape in the school’s revamped logo for its Huskies sports program. And to understand just what this reaction means, you really should read the “open letter” that Carolyn Luby wrote to UConn president Susan Herbst: [...]

  101. [...] days ago, Carolyn Luby, an undergraduate at University of Connecticut published a remarkable open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire.  In the letter she made her case and argued persuasively that [...]

  102. [...] days ago, Carolyn Luby, an undergraduate at University of Connecticut published a remarkable open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire.  In the letter she made her case and argued persuasively that [...]

  103. [...] days ago, Carolyn Luby, an undergraduate at University of Connecticut published a remarkable open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire.  In the letter she made her case and argued persuasively that [...]

  104. [...] days ago, Carolyn Luby, an undergraduate at University of Connecticut published a remarkable open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire.  In the letter she made her case and argued persuasively that [...]

  105. Ca se passe là bas loin. on April 29, 2013 at 5:01 am

    [...] encore une fois une histoire tristement banale. Une étudiante Carolyn Luby écrit une lettre à Susan Herbst, présidente de l’université du Connecticut où elle [...]

  106. Ca se passe là bas loin. on April 29, 2013 at 5:01 am

    [...] encore une fois une histoire tristement banale. Une étudiante Carolyn Luby écrit une lettre à Susan Herbst, présidente de l’université du Connecticut où elle [...]

  107. Ca se passe là bas loin. on April 29, 2013 at 5:01 am

    [...] encore une fois une histoire tristement banale. Une étudiante Carolyn Luby écrit une lettre à Susan Herbst, présidente de l’université du Connecticut où elle [...]

  108. Ca se passe là bas loin. on April 29, 2013 at 5:01 am

    [...] encore une fois une histoire tristement banale. Une étudiante Carolyn Luby écrit une lettre à Susan Herbst, présidente de l’université du Connecticut où elle [...]

  109. [...] University of Connecticut undergraduate student Carolyn Luby published an open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire. In the letter, she argued persuasively that the school should [...]

  110. [...] University of Connecticut undergraduate student Carolyn Luby published an open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire. In the letter, she argued persuasively that the school should [...]

  111. [...] University of Connecticut undergraduate student Carolyn Luby published an open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire. In the letter, she argued persuasively that the school should [...]

  112. [...] University of Connecticut undergraduate student Carolyn Luby published an open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire. In the letter, she argued persuasively that the school should [...]

  113. [...] University of Connecticut undergraduate student Carolyn Luby published an open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire. In the letter, she argued persuasively that the school should [...]

  114. [...] University of Connecticut undergraduate student Carolyn Luby published an open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire. In the letter, she argued persuasively that the school should [...]

  115. [...] University of Connecticut undergraduate student Carolyn Luby published an open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire. In the letter, she argued persuasively that the school should [...]

  116. [...] University of Connecticut undergraduate student Carolyn Luby published an open letter to the school’s president, Susan Herbst, in The Feminist Wire. In the letter, she argued persuasively that the school should [...]

  117. Huskies & Rape Memes | The CuT on May 6, 2013 at 9:06 am

    [...] we’ve got a new problem. UCONN is in hot water for its reaction to this Open Letter. Here’s the [...]

  118. Huskies & Rape Memes | The CuT on May 6, 2013 at 9:06 am

    [...] we’ve got a new problem. UCONN is in hot water for its reaction to this Open Letter. Here’s the [...]

  119. Huskies & Rape Memes | The CuT on May 6, 2013 at 9:06 am

    [...] we’ve got a new problem. UCONN is in hot water for its reaction to this Open Letter. Here’s the [...]

  120. Huskies & Rape Memes | The CuT on May 6, 2013 at 9:06 am

    [...] we’ve got a new problem. UCONN is in hot water for its reaction to this Open Letter. Here’s the [...]

  121. [...] student, Carolyn Luby, wrote an open letter to Ms. Herbst last month in response to the university’s move to adopt a new Husky logo for its [...]

  122. [...] student, Carolyn Luby, wrote an open letter to Ms. Herbst last month in response to the university’s move to adopt a new Husky logo for its [...]

  123. [...] student, Carolyn Luby, wrote an open letter to Ms. Herbst last month in response to the university’s move to adopt a new Husky logo for its [...]

  124. [...] student, Carolyn Luby, wrote an open letter to Ms. Herbst last month in response to the university’s move to adopt a new Husky logo for its [...]

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