Posts Tagged ‘ NFL ’

Rotten to the Core: The NFL and Domestic Violence

September 8, 2014
By
Rotten to the Core: The NFL and Domestic Violence

By David J. Leonard and Monica J. Casper The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey found that fully a third of women in the United States have experienced partner violence. Authors of the study note that the long-term consequences and public health burdens are “substantial,” especially for women. And yet, while many feminist...
Read more »

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Black life matters, Black Women, domestic violence, Family, masculinity, Patriarchy, Sexism, sexual violence, Sports, U.S. | 5 Comments »

Op-Ed: The NFL’s Response to Violence Against Women: Why One Fan Won’t Watch This Year

August 13, 2014
By
NFL

This is an issue of basic human dignity and respect. I, as a man, am perfectly capable of not beating up my wife and children. Most men are.
Read more »

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Family, masculinity, Op-Ed, Sports, U.S., Violence | 4 Comments »

We Need More Than Pink Cleats

April 25, 2014
By
WEST6956.jpg

By Kiana Cox Every October the NFL, in partnership with the American Cancer Society, adorns itself in pink to raise awareness about and funds for breast cancer.  Via their NFL Pink website, the league encourages women to make a “crucial catch” and to know that “annual screening saves lives.” Amidst these messages are videos...
Read more »

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Culture, Economy, Entertainment, masculinity, Patriarchy, Popular Culture, Privilege, Sexism, Sports, Television, U.S., Violence | Comments Off

On Michael Sam Coming Out

February 13, 2014
By
Kopay and Sam

By Cheryl Cooky Nearly a year ago today, I was invited to deliver a lecture to the students at Wabash College (a small, all-male, liberal arts College in central Indiana) on the issue of homophobia in sport. This was part of the lead up to Wabash College’s performance of Richard Greenberg‘s Tony-Award winning play...
Read more »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in masculinity, Patriarchy, Privilege, Sexuality, Sports | 3 Comments »

Feminist Football Fan: Reflections from the 12th Woman

January 17, 2014
By
Feminist Football Fan: Reflections from the 12th Woman

By Kimberly George My feminism and my love of football have a complicated relationship. When I was eight and watching Dave Krieg, Steve Largent, and my beloved Seattle Seahawks, I dreamed of being the first female player in the NFL.  It felt unjust to me that no women were allowed in, and I wanted...
Read more »

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Feminism, Sports | 6 Comments »

Kasandra Michelle Perkins: We Must Say Her Name

December 3, 2012
By
Kasandra Michelle Perkins: We Must Say Her Name

  In the aftermath of the tragic murder of Kasandra Michelle Perkins, and the subsequent suicide of Jovan Belcher, much of the media and social media chatter have focused on Belcher.  Indeed, Kasandra Michelle Perkins has been an afterthought in public conversations focused on questions regarding the Chiefs’ ability to play, concussions, masculinity, guns,...
Read more »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Black Women, Sports, Violence | 188 Comments »

Follow The Feminist Wire

Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

Princeton University Post Doc: Apply Now!