Posts Tagged ‘ Immigration ’

The Telling of Stories

November 25, 2014
By
Bia Vieira

Bia Vieira: When Toni comes into my life, when she invites me to understand my story as a way to find strength and value within myself, I am surprised by her attention. I am also very flattered. Her interest makes me wonder what she is seeing. I saw my secrets and shame, but was...
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Posted in Family, Immigration, intersectionality, LGBTQI, Militarization, Military, Sexuality, Toni Cade Bambara, Women of Color, World | No Comments »

A Latina’s Perspective on MBK

July 11, 2014
By
JEWEL SAMAD:AFP:Getty Images

On July 10, women of color spoke out on President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) policy initiative, in a webinar sponsored by the African American Policy Forum. The 90-minute webinar followed a June 17th letter signed by over 1,400 women of color from all walks of life—activists, artists, nurses, teachers, day laborers, students, academics,...
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Posted in Activism, Black Girls, Black Women, Ethnicity, Feminism, Immigration, Politics, Racism, Sexism, Sexuality, U.S., Women of Color | 3 Comments »

Finding Your Different

April 28, 2014
By
MujumdarPic2

By Vaidehi Mujumdar  We’ve already buried so much of our different, it feels so hard to find. Almost every day, my friend and I exchange poetry, current articles, quotes, and the casual Buzzfeed posts in an effort to satiate our love of reading. We live in different places, work different jobs, and have different...
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Posted in Academia, Bodies, College Feminisms, Culture, Education, Family, Feminism, History, Immigration, Love, Politics, Popular Culture, Privilege, Racism, U.S., Uncategorized, White Privilege, Whiteness, World, Writing | 3 Comments »

calling ourselves into freedom: Black art and decolonial aesthetics

April 18, 2014
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calling ourselves into freedom: Black art and decolonial aesthetics

By luam kidane as Black women who won’t accept the world as white supremacy gives it to us there is a jarring, a dissonance as you try to reconcile your spirit with the things you are told to believe and the people you are told should hold you and love you. so you...
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Posted in Culture, Love, Music, Popular Culture | 3 Comments »

Mushy Carrots

March 18, 2014
By
Nair

Gaayathri Nair, "I have been integrated, assimilated, subsumed and transformed forever by the experience of growing up other. It is like a chemical reaction, both components are irreversibly changed by their interaction with each other." #personalIsPoliticalOnTFW
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Posted in Culture, Education, Ethnicity, Family, Immigration, Personal is Political., Racism, Religion, Stereotypes, Women of Color | 4 Comments »

3 poems by Valerie Bandura

January 8, 2014
By
3 poems by Valerie Bandura

Vagina and Cross-Cocks   For their flag, ……….a sliced pair of white boxers, and on it, ………………………………………………………………in marmalade,   the diamond shape of a vagina ……………………………………………………….slightly open ………………………with wisps along the lips for pubic hair, ……………………………………………………………….and under that,   a pair of penises …………………..criss-crossed ………………………………like femur bones under a skull,   the shorts clipped...
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Posted in Arts & Culture | 1 Comment »

Feminist Leadership: Leading For the Least of Us

October 8, 2013
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Feminist Leadership: Leading For the Least of Us

By Kelly Macías  If you’ve been paying attention, the last three months have made for a fascinating study in leadership; or more specifically, the lack thereof. The George Zimmerman verdict in the Trayvon Martin case reinvigorated nationwide debate about the many ills plaguing the Black community. Bombarding us with commentary on crime and violence affecting...
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Posted in Feminism, Immigration, Violence | 3 Comments »

Race and The Invisible Cloak of “Black”

August 28, 2013
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Race in America: a story on becoming racialized with blackness while an immigrant

By Kuukua Yomekpe Two years into living in the U.S. a carload of Anglo American boys tried to run my two younger sisters and me over in an empty parking lot, yelling epithets, revving up their engine and doing donuts. Among the words, “Nigger” stood out. Not “monkey” not “jungle” but “Nigger.” It was 1997....
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Posted in Black Women, Ethnicity, History, Immigration, Racism, Women of Color, World | 11 Comments »

Originally Amalia

July 26, 2013
By
Originally Amalia

By Amalia Clarice Mora Life is easier, kinder, and more lenient when you are white, and this may be why George Zimmerman decided to downplay his mestizo origins and identify as white/white Hispanic during the Trayvon Martin trial.  Zimmerman is a partially white half-Hispanic, and as such he was already closer to whiteness and...
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Posted in Culture, History, Immigration, Racism, Women of Color | 7 Comments »

Why Sebastien de la Cruz Should Be Respected and Protected

June 13, 2013
By

To be in proximity to any NBA franchise during a championship run, for lots of kids in our sports obsessed culture, is a dream come true, especially if you are from the city of San Antonio. That could be said for mini-Mariachi phenom Sebastien de la Cruz, who sang the national anthem yesterday for...
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Posted in History, Immigration, Politics, Racism, U.S., Youth | 4 Comments »

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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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