Posts Tagged ‘ Fiction ’

Prologue: Audre Lorde – Word and Action

February 18, 2014
By
Jewelle Gomez & Audre Lorde
Image Credit: ©Greta Schiller

By Jewelle Gomez I’ve been thinking about Audre more than usual because I recently celebrated the 20th anniversary of the publication of my black, feminist, lesbian, vampire novel, The Gilda Stories. After Nancy Bereano, the book’s publisher, Audre shares a big responsibility for my novel’s existence. How a quote from one of her poems...
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Posted in Black Women, Feminism, Fiction, LGBTQI, Poetry, Women of Color | 1 Comment »

Fiction Feature: “In the Manner of Water or Light” by Roxane Gay

November 6, 2013
By
Roxane Gay

An excerpt from “In the Manner of Water or Light” By Roxane Gay   My mother was conceived in what would ever after be known as the Massacre River. The sharp smell of blood has followed her since. When she first moved to the United States, she read the dictionary from front to back....
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Ethnicity, Family, Fiction, Uncategorized, Women of Color, Writing | Comments Off

Fiction Feature: CORONA by Bushra Rehman

October 2, 2013
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Corona-TRUE5x8-100dpi

Corona (and I’m not talking about the beer) Corona, Queens 1983 Corona, and I’m not talking about the beer. I’m talking about a little village perched under the number 7 train in Queens between Junction Boulevard and 111th Street. I’m talking about the Corona Ice King, Spaghetti Park, and P.S. 19. The Corona F....
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Ethnicity, Family, Fiction, Immigration, Region, Uncategorized, Writing | Comments Off

Fiction Flash: Lyssa in Limbo

September 18, 2013
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By Michelle Auerbach (Excerpt from The Third Kind of Horse)   I stared hard at Melody, at the blonde tips of her hair and I knew, without a doubt, that the moment someone tells her that I kissed a straight guy a wall will shut like those doors in Star Trek that slide open and...
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Fiction Feature: "Planets" by Kaitlyn Greenidge

July 31, 2013
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By Kaitlyn Greenidge   We the only girls who leave our walk. We the only girls that travel. All the other girls on our walk, they stay. They never move. They start out standing around in a group all together, but only so boys notice them. Those girls, they don’t move. They don’t leave...
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Fiction, Film, Uncategorized, Women of Color, Writing, Youth | Comments Off

How to be Black in the Age of Obama, George Zimmerman, and Paula Deen: Notes from Summer, 2013

July 30, 2013
By
Racism_by_Eibo_Jeddah

  Welcome to the impossible future. White people are talking about race. Sometimes, they’ll even talk about racism. Some will say the word “racism” hesitantly, tentatively, as though it’s the name of an exotic food they’re not sure how to pronounce and are even less sure they’d like to taste. But they’ll say it....
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Posted in Activism, Black Women, Feminism, Fiction, History, LGBTQI, Op-Ed, Poetry, Sexuality, U.S., Women of Color, World, Writing | 9 Comments »

Django Unchained: A Critical Conversation Between Two Friends

December 31, 2012
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Django Unchained:  A Critical Conversation Between Two Friends

By David J. Leonard and Tamura A. Lomax There have been so many great discussions on Django Unchained, so many thoughtful and engaging articles, and even more critical engagements within social media.  We’ve seen everything from harsh critiques to high praise, and of course everything else in between.  The analyses, conversations and comments have all...
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Posted in Culture, Entertainment, Fiction, U.S., Violence | 20 Comments »

Pageantry

December 17, 2012
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Pageantry

By Petrina Crockford The first summer our dads were in Afghanistan, our moms on the base got together and organized a parade and pageant. Streamers hung from the tree branches and blew in the breeze; balloons tied to the community mailbox batted against each other; in the center of the cul-de-sac at the end...
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“Black Spaghetti;” or, “Spaghetti al Nero di Seppia”

October 8, 2012
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“Black Spaghetti;” or, “Spaghetti al Nero di Seppia”

By John Murillo B—- gasps into a waking death as the sun plagues the room with good-morning shade. Wordlessly, black flesh creaks upward, bending at its fulcrum, back arched backward, the silence of the unspoken pulling it up in a spectral embrace illuminated and shaded into a grotesque number two. A double possession captured...
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Excerpts from "Jumping the Jahru"

May 16, 2012
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Excerpts from "Jumping the Jahru"

By Nina Sharma Jones That Dress That dress?  It’s so heavy it could kill you.  It will cost as much as an SUV, shouldn’t run over you like one.  And in the future, no ganda bras.  You need to get a wonderful one.  Not better.  Yes, a wonder.  That’s it.  Now we are getting...
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Arts & Culture

  • Excerpts from In the Away Time by Kristen Nelson kristen

    . January You called me She instead of You. “Where is she going now?” is the first question you ever asked me. You were standing on a porch next to the last She who you broke. I remember looking up at you over my shoulder and smiling. I was going skinny-dipping. [...]

  • Poems for Ferguson: Vanessa Huang and Aya de Leon Michael-Brown-Ferguson-Missouri-Shooting-Petition-Racism-america_2014-08-15_17-44-22

    Two poets consider Michael Brown, Ferguson, MO, and the crucial ways in which Black Life Matters.     How Do I Love Thee? A love poem from the Ferguson, MO police dept to Black residents: An informal emulation of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Sonnet 43 by Aya de Leon . How [...]

  • “Paws” by Tracy Burkholder tracy

    Paws   In sixth grade, I started to envy certain girls’ hands. Not always manicured, but always neat. Fingers thin and smooth. These hands gently freed sheets of paper from their metal spirals and lifted loops of hair to more beautiful perches. Lunch trays floated inside their gentle grip while [...]