Feminists We Love: Mia Mingus

November 22, 2013
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One insidious effect of systematic oppressions–including ableism, sexism, white supremacy, queerphobia, classism, and colonialism–is that we become disconnected from one another and from ourselves. For Mia Mingus, justice depends on connection. On her blog Leaving Evidence, Mingus incites us to leave evidence: Evidence that we were here, that we existed, that we survived and loved and ached. Evidence of the wholeness we never felt and the immense sense of...
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Addressing the Criminalization of Disability from a Disability Justice Framework: Centring The Experiences of Disabled Queer Trans Indigenous and People of Colour

November 21, 2013
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By Abla Abdelhadi I write this piece in honour of the countless disabled queer trans Indigenous and People of Colour (IPOC) who have been criminalized, institutionalized, assaulted, tortured and or murdered by police/state agents, queer trans IPOC who are so often absent from our conversations about disability, both in academic and activist spaces. Using a disability justice framework, I will share with you my experience of surviving police and...
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We Exist In Darkness (Living at the Intersections)

November 21, 2013
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We Exist In Darkness (Living at the Intersections)

By: Naomi Ortiz Intersectionality is described by dominant culture as the location where all of our multiple identities intersect. However, my identities are not straight lines, which only intersect in one place. For me, intersectionality is more like living in multiple worlds at once. Intersectionality is like a woven basket. Pieces of me are woven together holding my experiences in the world, my soul. This basket holds the essence...
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Degeneracy Now! Suspended Between the Violence of Time and the Timelessness of Violence

November 20, 2013
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Degeneracy Now! Suspended Between the Violence of Time and the Timelessness of Violence

Several uneventful Friday evenings ago, I stayed in with my best friend to watch In Time, starring Justin Timberlake and Amanda Seyfried. The film, written, produced, and directed by Andrew Niccol, takes place against the backdrop of a dystopian world in which the universal means of exchange is not money, but time. In the film, folks are born with a digital clock, bearing one year of time, on the...
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All In a Day’s Work, or An Incomplete (Chronic)le of Illness

November 20, 2013
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All In a Day’s Work, or An Incomplete (Chronic)le of Illness

By Alli Yates Writing about my chronic illness is a tricky undertaking. Sitting, thinking, and expressing myself will almost certainly render my body more aching, more dizzy, and more confused than I was in the first place. If I do try to spill my thoughts somewhere, there’s ritual involved. When I wake up, I identify what hurts. Usually I have a strange fever of sorts. Extreme nausea. Heavy headache....
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Discourses of Disaster and How does it feel to be alive?

November 20, 2013
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Discourses of Disaster and How does it feel to be alive?

I’ve been thinking a lot about representation and competition among trans folks. I’ve been testing out joy as the most vulnerable human experience. Love, I think, is just the insistence of a generous translation. If this is true, I wonder what family means. Henri Bergson says, It is we who are passing when we say time is passing. CA Conrad says, Suddenly. And at no speed other than suddenly....
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On Disability and Cartographies of Difference

November 19, 2013
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By Wilfredo Gomez I recently returned to my alma mater to encounter a rather peculiar and interesting narrative about my legacy. While interacting with former teachers, classmates, and current students, stories were told about the years I spent at the school. One person told a story about how I played varsity basketball during my last year of high school, never having played a single minute. I trained in silence,...
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My Place in This Conversation

November 19, 2013
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By Alison Piepmeier I wasn’t forced to recognize my participation in oppressive systems related to disability until 2006, when activist and author Harriet McBryde Johnson called me out on it. I was hosting feminist events in spaces on campus that weren’t accessible to people with disabilities, and she noted that if I claim to be working for social justice, the use of inaccessible spaces undermined that effort. That was...
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TFW Takes a Winter Break

November 18, 2013
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By Tamura A. Lomax, Darnell L. Moore, and Monica J. Casper Y’all, we are tired. The Feminist Wire is successful beyond our imaginations and expectations. In 2012, we had over a million visitors to the site. In any given week, we have from 30,000 to more than 100,000 readers. And we absolutely love that you are reading what we publish, and commenting, sharing, and engaging with the authors and...
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“Operation Space Surgery” by Gabriele Gervickaite

November 18, 2013
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“Operation Space Surgery” by Gabriele Gervickaite

Operation Space Surgery “I think of my body – wires and screws in it, and marks of scalpel on my skin. My studio is a surgery room where I cut up electrical tapes and turn them into torsos. Here I reorganize body parts and bones. By exploring the body as medium, the surgical process as performance and the relationship between the two, I construct a cyborgian organism. I design...
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Our Lives Matter: Toward An Intersectional Politics Of Disability

November 18, 2013
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Our Lives Matter: Toward An Intersectional Politics Of Disability

The mantra “nothing about us, without us” echoes through the streets and hallways of disability liberation movements around the world. Of course, the “us” brought into view here is neither consolidated nor all-encompassing. Like non-disabled folk, disabled communities negotiate a multiplicity of politicized identities, socioeconomic locations, and embodied experiences simultaneously. While it may seem rather self-evident to foreground the ways in which disability does not operate in isolation, the...
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