Ten to Twelve Days

November 5, 2012
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By Liz A. As soon as I arrived, I was pissed that there were people standing in line outside. As I walked to my spot, I asked a Sistah, “What is going on?” Her reply: “They are not opening the door until 10:00 am.” Boisterously, I almost yelled, “10 am?!” Grumbling, I walked to the back of the line, now extremely pissed. When I called a day earlier, the...
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Ballet Macabre

November 5, 2012
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By Traci-Ann Wint   Forgive me. She fell into an abyss that had nothing to do with me - an unabashed misery paralleled by none but my own. For you know, misery loves company. Her air - Contagious. The medicinal benefits of laughter have no place here. Joy is for the carefree and our combined burdens were more than the world could hold. Turning on the unreliable axis of dependent...
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Black Women, Black Criticism, and the Unremovable Veil of Jezebel

November 2, 2012
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In her groundbreaking text, Hine Sight: Black Women and the Reconstruction of American History, black feminist scholar Darlene Clark Hine makes a distinction between black women and girl’s experiences “under slavery” and “after slavery.”  She opines that under slavery black women and girls placed priority on protecting their sexual being, however during freedom, while both violence and the threat of violence, sexual and otherwise, remained in tact, emphasis on...
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Dead Center

November 2, 2012
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Dead Center

By LeConté J. Dill The subject of Black Academic Women’s Health beckons an autoethnographic approach: October 2006.  Excited to get new specs. “E D F C Z P.” “Is this one better?  Or this one?… Here’s the first.  And the second… Click the button when you see the faint white light….” Didn’t expect the white light to be so faint.  Didn’t expect the tech to start running around the office,...
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Should-ing All Over Ourselves

November 2, 2012
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By Koritha Mitchell In November 2001, right before I began writing my dissertation, I experienced one of the defining moments of my life. I had recently become ABD (all but dissertation) by passing my qualifying exams and had learned of an upcoming symposium at Princeton University in honor of Claudia Tate, the author of Domestic Allegories of Political Desire, one of the literary studies that impressed me most while...
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Black, Female and Buddhist in Academia: Threats to Wellness and Opportunities for Healing

November 1, 2012
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By Kamilah Majied Renown educator and Buddhist leader, Dr. Daisaku Ikeda offers a vision for academia when he states, Education makes us free. It is through education that we are liberated from powerlessness, from the burden of mistrust directed against ourselves. The individual who has been liberated from self-doubt, who has learned to trust in him- or herself, is naturally able to believe in the latent capacities of others....
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Out of the Shadows: A Conversation with Evelyn C. White

November 1, 2012
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“For every well-known black woman whose death has been noted and marked, there are countless other black women who have died in the shadows. These are the black women in our neighborhoods and communities who suffer in silence from AIDS, hypertension, diabetes or domestic violence. They are the black women who die without anyone ever asking why death came to call so soon.” These words appeared in 1990 in...
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It is not worth the grief: A recovering work addict tries to model self-care

November 1, 2012
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By J. Victoria Sanders  I first dreamed of being a professor and writer in seventh grade after reading Breaking Bread: Insurgent Black Intellectual Life by bell hooks and Cornel West. Their brilliant minds reflected on the page made it safer to imagine a future where I wouldn’t be isolated for being the girl in the Bronx who talked like a white girl. I viewed academia as a sanctuary and refuge,...
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It's Not The Load That Breaks You Down; It's The Way You Carry It

October 31, 2012
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By Kamilah Aisha Moon Five strong, consistent years as an adjunct professor. So what? So what you spend extra, unpaid hours assisting students who arrive needing far more than a semester in your class could ever provide. So what you need surgery to literally keep from bleeding to death from a condition that was exacerbated by all of the hustling you have to do just to stay afloat. It gets...
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Occupying Myself: Resisting the Colonial Voices Within and Accepting My Heaviness

October 31, 2012
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By Erin “Mari” Morales-Williams Right now I am depressed.  My aunt’s husband sexually violated me when I was a teenager, and since she is still with him and he still comes to family events, I am forced to mentally split if I am to still enjoy my family. He was in my house for the past three days for my cousin’s graduation festivities, and though I have healed and...
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With Audre as My Guide: Teaching and Surviving in Post Katrina New Orleans

October 30, 2012
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By Sandra E. Weissinger I started my career as a sociologist in New Orleans five years after Hurricane Katrina. The school I worked at still held classes in trailers. The trailers were old. The interiors would get wet when it rained. Doors would not close. Several were said to have a mold problem. The makeshift campus would often flood and we would wade through the water to see each...
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