The Masculinity Scorecard

March 11, 2013
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Growing up, even into my teenage years, friends and family often described me as a “sweet boy.”  Whether from my grandmother or from a girl in my class, the mantra, “Davey is kind and gentle” was as commonplace as any other “compliment.”  I am a sensitive and caring soul so the description has always been appropriate. Yet, for me, it didn’t always feel like a compliment.  What I heard...
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Man in Sound, Man in Place

March 11, 2013
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By Carlos Ulises Decena At age ten, I joined my local troupe of the Asociación de Scouts Dominicanos (Dominican Boy Scout Association) in Santo Domingo. Immigration to the United States was still years away from my family’s horizon, and joining the troupe sprang from the recognition that biology was not enough: my apprenticeship of manhood could no longer be postponed, and it had to happen en la calle. I...
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The Pulaski Skyway of Our Manhoods

March 11, 2013
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By Edgar Rivera Colón The jet black steel girders arched like aging flexed muscles fill my mind as I remember car rides with my Dad across the Pulaski Skyway glistening under motley gray Northern New Jersey skies. I recall my father at the wheel, after he retired from the Western Electric industrial works in Kearney, saying almost every time: “You kids look at that empty factory. That was my...
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Take the Shackles Off My Feet So I Can Dance*: A Call to End Gender Policing

March 11, 2013
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By Robert Jones, Jr. Real men aren’t polite; politeness is for sissies. Body posturing is everything; real men don’t cross their legs at the knee or let their hands fall limp at the wrist. Real men put Money Over Everything; C.R.E.A.M. Real men ain’t nurturers; they provide discipline and financial support only (and they only provide those two things if they feel like it). Real men use violence to...
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Introduction: The Masculinities Forum

March 11, 2013
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By Lisa Jean Moore When I was invited to participate in coordinating The Feminist Wire’s Forum on Masculinities, I was both excited and more than a bit anxious. Certainly the reflexive and critical examination of masculinities is deeply interesting to me as a sociologist, a mother, a wife, a feminist, an American, and a human being.  But still, I worried about being in the awkward and uncomfortable position of...
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Special Report: The Feminist Wire goes to the Commission on the Status of Women, or the CSW Through My Virgin Eyes

March 10, 2013
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Special Report: The Feminist Wire goes to the Commission on the Status of Women, or the CSW Through My Virgin Eyes

By Special TFW Correspondent, Mazuba Haanyama Week one is rapidly drawing to an end and I feel like I have been hit by a train; a collision of cargo reminiscent of struggles fought by my ancestors in my dreams light years ago. This is the end of week one at the Commission on the Status of Women, in New York City. Perhaps rather naively I thought this space would somehow...
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Op-Ed: Solo Women Travelers: “Go Out Without Your Body”

March 10, 2013
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Op-Ed: Solo Women Travelers: “Go Out Without Your Body”

By Alice Driver “The only thing left to say is, ‘If you don’t want anything to happen to you, go out without your body,’” instructed Mexican journalist Carlos Monsiváis. He was writing about the victims of violence against women and feminicide in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, and criticizing the way in which the media read the women’s bodies – the clothes, the lipstick, the location of the body in the...
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Introducing Erik C. Hollis: Editorial Intern

March 9, 2013
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Introducing Erik C. Hollis:  Editorial Intern

Erik Hollis is a Black queer feminist undergraduate student at the University of Arizona double-majoring in Gender & Women’s Studies (Sexualities and Queer Studies emphasis) and Film and Television Studies. Erik is interested in critically engaging cinema and film as constituting a powerful ideological apparatus that at once mediates and structures social relations writ large. Jointly contemplating race, gender, and sexuality, he is interested in the ways cinema and...
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Delhi: From Shame to Defiance

March 8, 2013
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Delhi: From Shame to Defiance

By Harsha Walia Two months ago, Jyoti Singh Pandey was brutally raped and beaten by a group of men in Delhi. She died a few weeks later. As someone who grew up, in part, in what is known as the rape capital of India, in some of the same neighborhoods blasted across television screens and Facebook feeds, it has taken me months to process this harrowing incident as well...
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For Tanya With Love

March 7, 2013
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It has been almost one year since Tanya McDowell was sentenced in a Bridgeport, Connecticut courtroom to five years in prison. Police charged McDowell for “stealing” $15,686 worth of educational services from Newport, Connecticut for her son. While the two were, in fact, homeless and spent nights in shelters in Norwalk, a friend’s apartment in Bridgeport, and a van parked in both Connecticut towns, authorities concluded that McDowell’s son...
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how time passes now, how space changes here: Black Feminist Calculus and A Review of R. Erica Doyle’s Proxy

March 7, 2013
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Months ago, I was sitting in a Laotian restaurant talking about the possibility of Black Feminist Calculus with the brilliant mathematician and carpenter Maia Boudreaux and she said: “There is calculus going on all the time in our bodies.  Imagine if we were to go outside and I were to throw you the keys and you were to catch them.  How did we do it?  Our bodies calculated it. ...
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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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