Imagining Patsey’s Rescue by Harriet Tubman (Or, Marie Laveau’s Vengeance)

November 8, 2013
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twelve-years-a-slave-michael-fassbender

By Janell Hobson Having seen 12 Years a Slave twice (first at a fundraising event and later at a private screening and discussion), I am struck by the story of Patsey (superbly portrayed by Lupita Nyong’o), the enslaved woman who is “prized” and “favored” by Solomon Northup’s second owner, Edwin Epps (Michael Fassbender in a chillingly predatory role).  Northup’s survival narrative is a harrowing tale and poetically captured in...
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COLLEGE FEMINISMS: No Fat, No Femme: The Politics of Grindr

November 8, 2013
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atrip

By Nick Artrip I turn on my phone and allow my fingers to scroll across the numerous apps. I select “Grindr” and smile with anticipation. So many possibilities await me! Loves undiscovered, connections that I may not have been able to make before. As I read more and more profile descriptions I become disheartened. “No fat” I see.  I take in phrases such as “no femme” or “masc only.” Everything...
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Feminists We Love: Caitlin Breedlove & SONG

November 8, 2013
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Caitlin Breedlove 2012

Southerners on New Ground (aka SONG) has been driving intersectional queer organizing in the South since 1993. Mobilizing across race, class, gender, citizenship status, sexuality , age, and ability, SONG employs a grassroots membership model and relational organizing to fortify queer communities towards the end of social justice. Caitlin Breedlove  has been a Co-Director of SONG since 2006. is a queer, white feminist with family roots in central and...
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The Color of Teaching: Expectations of Mammy in the Classroom

November 6, 2013
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The Color of Teaching: Expectations of Mammy in the Classroom

By Manya Whitaker On October 24, 2013 the Center for American Progress released a report, The State of Women of Color in the United States. In the 40-page document there are data points comparing the economic, health, educational and employment status of African American, Asian and Hispanic women to their white counterparts. Most prevalent is the statistic suggesting that by the year 2050, 53% of the female population will be...
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Fiction Feature: “In the Manner of Water or Light” by Roxane Gay

November 6, 2013
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Roxane Gay

An excerpt from “In the Manner of Water or Light” By Roxane Gay   My mother was conceived in what would ever after be known as the Massacre River. The sharp smell of blood has followed her since. When she first moved to the United States, she read the dictionary from front to back. Her vocabulary quickly became extensive. Her favorite word is suffuse, to spread over or through...
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Women Writers of the Diaspora with TFW Collective Member Mecca Jamilah Sullivan

November 5, 2013
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New School Flyer

.. . Join us as TFW editorial collective member Mecca Jamilah Sullivan reads at the New School for Public Engagement, as part of the Women Writers of the Diaspora reading series. . . Thursday, November 7, 2013 at 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm The New School for Public Engagement Dorothy Hirshon Suite (Room I205), Arnhold Hall 55 West 13th Street, New York, NY. . Mecca Jamilah Sullivan, author of the...
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What Does Solidarity Look Like? The 2014 Winter Olympics

November 5, 2013
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What Does Solidarity Look Like? The 2014 Winter Olympics

By Paisley Currah Every two years, the Olympic Games brings the world together to celebrate sports, witness the sacrifices and determination of the competitors, and admire the perfection of the muscles and contours of the athletes’ bodies (though the summer games provides more opportunity for that than the winter games). While competitors are grouped by nation–and certainly the medal count by country matters a lot–it’s also celebrated as an...
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“Action Expresses Priorities”: The Sochi Olympics and a Culture of Complicity

November 5, 2013
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“Action Expresses Priorities”: The Sochi Olympics and a Culture of Complicity

The upcoming Sochi Olympics are already shrouded in violence and inequality.  It is the Olympics after all, so the political, social, and cultural entanglements between the world’s largest sporting spectacle and the broader social realities (injustices) are nothing new. Yet, with the Olympics just over the horizon, 2014 will spotlight the ongoing oppression facing GLBTQ communities and their allies in Russia (and beyond). As with U.S. outrage over racism within...
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Say No to Homophobia: The 2014 Russian Olympics

November 4, 2013
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Russian Olympics

By Zillah Eisenstein I have recently returned from St. Petersburg, where nationalist thugs assaulted gay pride demonstrators in June of this year after Putin passed a law forbidding “propaganda of non-traditional sexual relations to minors.” The documentary “Children 404” describes these developments. Since the passage of Putin’s punitive bill, anti-LGBT violence and harassment is on the rise. Putin’s most recent declarations use homophobic anti-feminist discourses to express his newest...
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Op-Ed: What We Can Learn from the 2014 Winter Olympics?

November 3, 2013
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2014 Winter Olympics

By Wade Davis II Every four years I look forward to the Olympics. To be honest, I’m not ultra enamored with the opening day pageantry and festivities — I watch for the athletes and the competition. Watching these athletes compete against the best in the world, to be named the best in the world, is indescribable. Imagine that. But this year’s Winter Olympics offer us all an opportunity to...
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Feminists We Love: Thandisizwe Chimurenga

November 1, 2013
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Thandisizwe Chimurenga

Thandisizwe Chimurenga is an award-winning, freelance journalist based in Los Angeles.  She came to journalism through activism, understanding how powerful media can be for destroying or building grassroots, revolutionary change. She has been a writer and creator or co-creator of media (newspapers, Cable TV, radio) for over 20 years (most notably as co-creator of the groundbreaking Black women’s show Some of Us are Brave on KPFK Los Angeles), and...
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