Gratefulness

December 24, 2012
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Gratefulness

The holiday season is not just about gifts and Santa Claus, it’s about being grateful for what you have and recognizing the people who are not as fortunate as some of us. These people include immigrants, the poor, and the wealthy (who sometimes aren’t as nice as others). I am grateful for many things such as a good education, my family, and my safety. I feel deeply sorry for...
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Talking About Grief and Violence

December 21, 2012
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From the editors: Here at TFW, we have many, many email and phone conversations that never make their way onto our site. We bounce ideas off of each other, share thoughts and life updates, and also process how we’re feeling about goings-on in the world. And as with many families/communities, our exchanges are messy, raw, emotional, sometimes contested, and often do not lead to any specific resolution. The messiness...
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Black Feminist Intellectual: A Conversation with Professor Imani Perry

December 20, 2012
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DM: At present, you hold a primary appointment as a Professor within the Center for African American Studies and a secondary appointment in Law and Public Affairs at Princeton University. You hold a Ph.D. (Harvard University) and J.D. (Harvard Law), and your interdisciplinary research focuses on race and African American culture. You describe yourself as a Black feminist who was born in the South and who presently lives in a...
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Book Review: 101 Things That Are Not True About The Most Famous Black Women Alive

December 19, 2012
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Book Review: 101 Things That Are Not True About The Most Famous Black Women Alive

101 Things That Are Not True About The Most Famous Black Women Alive (ebook) by Alexis Pauline Gumbs Reviewed by Sarah Mantilla Griffin   The form of the list has not always been kind to black women.  Since slave ledgers first recorded the names, dates of sale, and approximate ages of human chattel, black women have been expected to be immediately visible, legible, knowable, and therefore objectifiable and commodifiable.  Truths...
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Black Survival in the Uchromatic Dark

December 18, 2012
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Black Survival in the Uchromatic Dark

By Tavia Nyong’o With all the rock dinosaurs that thundered the Madison Square Garden dome during Wednesday’s 12-12-12 benefit concert, a viewer might have missed that the event also meant to showcase the resilient ordinary people of the greater New York and New Jersey area whose lives were upended by Hurricane Sandy. As with the post-9/11 benefit concert — organized eleven years earlier and for the benefit of the...
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Pageantry

December 17, 2012
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Pageantry

By Petrina Crockford The first summer our dads were in Afghanistan, our moms on the base got together and organized a parade and pageant. Streamers hung from the tree branches and blew in the breeze; balloons tied to the community mailbox batted against each other; in the center of the cul-de-sac at the end of my street, our mothers made a stage out of pallets they borrowed from the...
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Nice White Boys Next Door and Mass Murder

December 16, 2012
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Nice White Boys Next Door and Mass Murder

Standing in line at the California Science Center the day of the mass murder at Sandy Hook Elementary school, my students wondered aloud about the race of the shooter.  “More than likely he was white,” they agreed. As the only people of color waiting to be admitted to the exhibit, their open question about race elicited visible unease from a group of elderly white women across the line from...
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Lily and Michelle

December 14, 2012
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Lily and Michelle

By Cynthia Tavilla Our children will not meet our every expectation, fulfill our every dream, or follow our agenda.  Our children live out their own destinies, after all, not ours.  Many of our children will be different from us physically, intellectually, socially, artistically, athletically, religiously, and politically. Our role is to nurture these individuals, as they discover who they are and who they are becoming, and to allow and...
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Indian Sex Workers More Than Vectors of Disease

December 13, 2012
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Indian Sex Workers More Than Vectors of Disease

By Gowri Vijayakumar Embedded within a recent New York Times piece about sex work in India is a problematic set of assumptions—a conflation of individualization with autonomy, linked to the strange implication that women’s autonomy is dangerous, a gateway to disease and social breakdown. Because I study sex work and HIV prevention in India, I was happy to see my interests made visible in a mainstream media outlet. But...
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A Photo-essay: Decolonizing My Body, My Being

December 12, 2012
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A Photo-essay: Decolonizing My Body, My Being

By: Edward Ndopu In the winter of 2011, almost three weeks before my twenty-first birthday, I had the extraordinary pleasure of joining forces with photographer Saddi Khali, a visionary artist celebrated for producing exquisite nude portraits of black and brown bodies. In fact, I myself commissioned him to photograph me nude. Initially, I was enthusiastic about the idea, but when Saddi agreed to a photo shoot, I was petrified....
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Poem Suite: Bodies

December 12, 2012
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Poem Suite: Bodies

    Have Your Own Timeless Edition Every Black Woman for Free                                By Naomi Extra       Arrives unassembled See instructions enclosed:     1. Administer the Rosa Parks Test For Purity (Repeat as often as needed)   2. Use the Hottentot method to Strip down the items for examination   3. Take the syllables of the word biopsy To make hysterectomy   4. Listen to her...
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