Under Ivory-Tower Eyes: Influence of Womanist Warriors as Public Intellectuals

October 29, 2012
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By Lindah Mhando  This is a dedication to my dear sister friend Aaronette White. The use of the word “warrior” doesn’t suggest women as warmongers ready to pick up the sword; instead it deploys critical thinking on how issues of Womanist health can be thought and re-thought in the academy. To me this topic raises many personal health, political, philosophical, and pedagogical questions. I first briefly comment on the sparse...
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Can I Live?

October 29, 2012
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By Analena Hope “Can I live?” This simple yet resounding question has been posed a number of times in different ways by Black feminists within and outside of the academy, and quite often the answer is: no, not without a fight and an intentional will to be well. If the academy is a body, then we, the academics, are the blood being pushed through the arteries: the higher the...
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Black (Academic) Women's Health: To Be in Context

October 29, 2012
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By Tressie McMillan Cottom My great grandmother used to pay me to talk, about anything and nothing. She just “loved to hear that child speak!” She said my oratory would be my saving grace. My mother said my little red tongue would get me into more trouble than she could save me from. They were both right. It is no small thing for a colored girl child to refuse...
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Afterword: On Voting

October 27, 2012
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Over this past week, TFW Collective members and guest writers have had their say about electoral politics, generally, and voting, specifically. Over and over again, we returned to the significance of history, specifically the obligations that some of us feel towards our political forbearers. It is striking that each contributor to this Forum embodies statuses that would have excluded us from voting at one time or another in US...
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White Rage, Black Obama

October 27, 2012
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Reflections on the DNC: Part 2 The hysteria that characterizes these commotions convinces me that the current American political scene, so heavy with anxiety and unhappy conscience at the moment, is riper now for psychoanalytic inquiry as an efficacious human science than it has ever been… —Hortense Spillers, “Destiny’s Child: Obama and Election ’08″ boundary 2 39:2 (2012), p. 9. Suddenly this whole...
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He’s Not the One We’ve Been Waiting For: Thoughts on Collective Effervescence, Stockholm Syndrome, Reluctant Voting, and Reclaiming “We”

October 26, 2012
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“And who will join this standing up and the ones who stood without sweet company will sing and sing back into the mountains and if necessary even under the sea: we are the ones we have been waiting for.” June Jordan   It’s not the copious conversation about the election or the virulent partisan sentiment that has me eager for this Presidential election season to come to a close....
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Voting as an Act of Reckoning with Communal Obligations

October 26, 2012
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Voting as an Act of Reckoning with Communal Obligations

  I grew up in South Texas listening to startling accounts of Mexican Americans robbed of their right to vote by power holders so threatened by the democratic impulse of brown and black communities that they resorted to the politics of violence, repression and intimidation.  I vote every election to honor the memory of black and brown people like my grandmother Angelita whose right to vote hinged on paying...
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A Response to "Voting as a Radical Act": A Word on the Shade of Shade…

October 25, 2012
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A Response to "Voting as a Radical Act": A Word on the Shade of Shade…

By: Jakeya Caruthers Though an old trope, what makes a sketch like “I Know Black People” so electrically hilarious is its sharp challenge to the immediacy of claims by whites or other outsiders of access to black cultural interiority, claims fueled by mediating technologies and an obnoxious post-everything culture of appropriation.  “I Know Black People” is, among other things, a challenge to the illusion of black transparency or referential...
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Voting as a Radical Act

October 25, 2012
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By: Isaiah M. Wooden and Darnell L. Moore In a different presidential election year, 2004, Comedy Central’s ever-popular sketch series, Chapelle’s Show, featured a boundlessly funny segment called, “I Know Black People.”1 Inspired by a conversation with a white viewer who suggested that the show was perhaps offensive to its black audiences, the segment convenes a motley crew of contestants “who claim to know black people”—including a white African-American...
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My First Vote

October 25, 2012
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It’s a strange time to be a young woman in America and to be facing voting for the very first time. When women are still making only 77 cents to every man’s dollar and when states like Arizona have recently passed legislation that requires all schools to leave abortion out of any lessons about unwanted pregnancy, it’s hard to look at our everyday struggles and not conclude that we...
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Queer the Vote

October 24, 2012
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By: Samuel “Basil” Soper In first grade, my teacher asked, “Do you know who your parents are voting for?” I announced to my peers that my parents supported George Bush Senior. “Personally, I like the other guy,” I added. Bill Clinton seemed so much more hip. He played the saxophone.  While I knew nothing about politics, I knew I didn’t agree with my parents. My father was abusive—an alcoholic,...
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