Op-Eds at The Feminist Wire

January 27, 2013
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Here at The Feminist Wire, we like to roll with the punches, grow with the times, and reinvent ourselves when necessary and fruitful. This week, we enjoyed an opportunity to publish an op-ed by feminist scholar Lynne Huffer, which appears today. And this got us to thinking…why not dedicate Sundays at TFW to op-eds? The op-ed is a particular kind of textual animal. In newspapers across the country, the...
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Op-Ed: Abortion Rights Advocates Need to Knock Roe from its Pedestal

January 27, 2013
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Op-Ed: Abortion Rights Advocates Need to Knock Roe from its Pedestal

By Lynne Huffer “It’s Personal,” the new abortion rights campaign of the National Women’s Law Center, hinges on language like this: “Only you know what it’s like to walk in your shoes.” Another ad reads: “The decision whether to have an abortion belongs to you.” The Law Center’s campaign is being launched to highlight Planned Parenthood’s recent decision—synchronized with this month’s 40-year anniversary of Roe v Wade—to abandon the “pro-choice”...
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Shades of Darkness—And Now A Sliver of Light

January 26, 2013
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Today, January 26, 2013, marks India’s 64th anniversary as a republic. It is not an old republic if seen in “nation” years but definitely old in “human” years. My mother is 64, which means she was born in the year India was declared a republic—she was one of the many millions of Indians to whom the nation and its constitution (and its pledge to making their lives free) was...
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Victory

January 25, 2013
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Victory

By Erica Cardwell In grade school, we used a phonics book called the Victory Drill Book. It was filled with various words, prefixes, suffixes, and alliteration to sharpen our learning skills through timed phonetic repetition. The book was a hardcover–navy blue, with its name branded in gold on the front. We’d been trained to trace each word with a pencil held horizontally under each pairing or phrase, with a...
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Anne Braden: Defiant, Inspiring, and Self-Aware

January 23, 2013
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Anne Braden: Defiant, Inspiring, and Self-Aware

Emblematic of a generation of men and women in the South that challenged their parents’ generation’s views on race, jobs, gender, sexuality, and a broader sense of the world, Anne Braden did more than look backwards.  She, like Bayard Rustin, was a woman “ahead of her times, yet the times didn’t know it.”  Anne Braden: Southern Patriot, a documentary from California Newsreel, highlights how she did not merely respond...
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Roe v. Wade's 40th Anniversary

January 22, 2013
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Roe v. Wade's 40th Anniversary

By Rachel G. Fuchs This week, we commemorate the 40th Anniversary of the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that allowed women the fundamental human right to make one of the most personal and difficult medical decisions – whether to terminate a pregnancy.  Over 60 percent of Americans agree with this Supreme Court ruling, and the legality of this fundamental right helps keep the procedure safe.  The illegality of...
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Choosing Our Own Lives: Two 40-Something Feminists Reflect on Roe

January 22, 2013
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Choosing Our Own Lives: Two 40-Something Feminists Reflect on Roe

By Aishah Shahidah Simmons and Monica J. Casper January 20, 2013 Aishah: Are you there, Monica? It’s me, Aishah....
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Washington Post and 'Feminist Americans' Won't Let Michelle Obama Have It All

January 20, 2013
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Washington Post and 'Feminist Americans' Won't Let Michelle Obama Have It All

This began as an essay about the re-emergence of the “having it all” debate, led by Anne Marie Slaughter’s article in The Atlantic last year. Then, the Washington Post ran a story this week about the feminist backlash against Michelle Obama’s insistence that she is a “mom-in-chief,” and this essay took on a new life for me. I have argued that trickle-down feminism, the likes of which Slaughter champions,...
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What We Aren’t Talking About When We Talk About Gun Control

January 18, 2013
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What We Aren’t Talking About When We Talk About Gun Control

In the wake of the Newtown shootings, the airwaves have been vibrating—often furiously—with conversations about guns. And as always in the United States, the issue is framed as a rigid binary of pro and con, them and us. Gun control advocates, including President Obama, want to place the discursive emphasis firmly on violence and the harm guns cause. They largely support restrictions of various kinds. Gun owners and gun...
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Code Red Homophobia: Homelessness, HIV and Black Religiosity

January 17, 2013
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Code Red Homophobia: Homelessness, HIV and Black Religiosity

For the past several months, Crenshaw Boulevard in predominantly black South Los Angeles has featured a series of striking billboards condemning homophobia and its role in the HIV/AIDS epidemic.  The billboards are the work of the black gay activist group In the Meantime Men, headed by Jeffrey King.  Sounding a “code red alarm” on the raging HIV/AIDS epidemic amongst African Americans King said, “The staggering rates of increased teen...
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Three Poems

January 16, 2013
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Three Poems

by Alessandra Lynch     mademoiselles d’avignon   The one we look at as the one cursed hangs her orange beast-face, a block for a breast   angular, vacant might-be eyes or maybe some shape screwed to fit the composition of the idea, the abstraction, the thing, a smile or simply a slit through which you can draw your ticket and enter the gate (I’m afraid, sir, you’ll  find...
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Arts & Culture

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    . January You called me She instead of You. “Where is she going now?” is the first question you ever asked me. You were standing on a porch next to the last She who you broke. I remember looking up at you over my shoulder and smiling. I was going skinny-dipping. […]

  • Poems for Ferguson: Vanessa Huang and Aya de Leon Michael-Brown-Ferguson-Missouri-Shooting-Petition-Racism-america_2014-08-15_17-44-22

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  • “Paws” by Tracy Burkholder tracy

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