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March 17, 2013
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By David Serlin In spring 1983, the National Rifle Association published an advertisement featuring 16-year-old Brian Kubricky proudly displaying both his rifle and his disability in the pages of Reader’s Digest. Wearing the puffy beige down jacket and puffy bangs so redolent of early 1980s approximations of a tempered rugged masculinity, the photogenic Kubricky poses by the edge of a placid lake while cradling an enormous rifle in his...
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Masculinity and Domestic Violence: A Conversation with Sally MacNichol and Quentin Walcott, Co-Executive Directors of CONNECT

March 16, 2013
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Quentin: It’s interesting that Sally and I were invited to talk about masculinity and domestic violence; these are two issues that are often seen as separate and unrelated. Examining the connection between masculinity and domestic violence has been critical in our effort to transform people’s attitudes and beliefs that lead to domestic violence. What we have learned from the link between masculinity and domestic violence is in part why...
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Feminist Anxiety about Domestic Violence Against Men

March 16, 2013
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By Jennifer Gaboury The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was recently reauthorized after an unexpected delay — a delay that extends beyond, now routine, Republican obstructionism – attributed to opposition to the extension of protections to groups such as immigrants and Native American women.  I’m interested in another exclusion that has sometimes been raised since the passage of the legislation in 1994, of intimate partner violence against men. In heterosexual couples,...
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Wade Davis: On Sports and Masculinity

March 15, 2013
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Wade Davis: On Sports and Masculinity

An activist, commentator, and change agent, Davis has emerged as one of the most prominent voices of his generation. Davis is a former NFL football player who played for the Tennessee Titans, Washington Redskins and Seattle Seahawks, as well as two different teams within the NFL Europe league. Since retiring, he’s owned a media business through a partnership with the New York Times called InMotion Media.  Currently he works...
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Taking the white man-boy seriously

March 15, 2013
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By Kyle Kusz The white man-boy is the most important cultural figure in America today. Hyperbole?  Maybe. But, allow me to make a case that the ‘white man-boy industrial complex’ is producing ways of being and knowing the world, particularly for white men, that threaten the social interests (if not rights) of women and people of color in contemporary American culture and little critical attention is being given to...
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Rethinking Masculinities: A Queer Woman of Color's Perspective

March 15, 2013
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By Muna Mire Within our capitalist heteropatriarchial cultural imaginary, masculinity figures as a sort of psychomachia. This is to say, masculinity has proven itself to be a double-edged sword in resisting the hierarchies of power and privilege that are so destructive to our humanity. As a cis, queer woman of color, who is femme by choice, I have been shaped by my own experience of the masculine in ways...
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Drowning in Wool

March 15, 2013
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By Zach Stafford In high school, I was obsessed with planning what I was going to wear to school every day. The nights before classes I would spend hours upon hours sorting through clothes, losing myself in the depths of my closet. I would stage at least three different options on my bedroom floor, arranged and styled in the ways in which I would wear them – even pulling...
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Kill With Power

March 15, 2013
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By Shaka McGlotten “Dig Deeper!” exhorts Shaun T. He sidles up to Chris, a big, dark-skinned guy at the back of the basketball court; Chris looks like he’s floating during “power jumps,” an exercise in which you launch off the floor and, mid-air, slap your hands against your knees. Shaun T asks Chris, “Ready, brother?” and then they move into floor sprints. Next, “moving pushups.” I look over at...
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The Shapings of Black Masculinities

March 14, 2013
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The B52 bus picks up passengers on the corner of Gates and Lewis Avenue in the mostly working poor to middle class, black Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn. This particular bus stop, which is a few blocks south of the famed Marcy Projects of Jay-Z’s past, is visited by hordes of black residents of various ages daily. Today, if any of those black commuters take a moment while waiting for...
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Lessons on What It Must Be, Not What It Could: Growing Up Black and Boy in America

March 14, 2013
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By Hashim Pipkin  At age twelve, before I had one full year of formal schooling, I had a notion as to what life meant that no education could ever alter, a conviction that the meaning of living came only when one was struggling to wring a meaning out of meaningless suffering. Richard Wright, Black Boy  One must say yes to life, and embrace it wherever it is found and...
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Black Men Writing to Live: Brothers' Letters

March 14, 2013
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By Mychal Denzel Smith, Darnell L. Moore, Kiese Laymon, and Kai M. Green What follows is a series of letters shared between four writers who have quickly become brothers. We have vastly different backgrounds, but discovered that we share so many similarities writing and living as black men in the US today. Peace fam, I’m just waking up on the anniversary of Malcolm X’s assassination, the birthday of Nina...
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Arts & Culture

  • I’ve Got Something To Say About This: A Survival Incantation Kate Rushin
credit/copyright: Rachel Eliza Griffiths

    Kate Rushin: I see the whole thing played out. I’m bludgeoned, bloody, raped. My story is reduced to filler buried in the back of the paper, on page 49, and I say, “No. No way.”

  • what is left M. Nzadi Keita
photograph: ©Elizabeth Ho

    M. Nzadi Keita: what you remember/ starts with a smile/ a raw edge/ a single snip/ from the someone dead

  • Praise to the Writer Toni Cade Bambara,
Southern Collective of African American Writers (SCAAW), 1988
©Susan J. Ross

    Alice Lovelace: Toni Cade made an art of living/ Toni stood and we were lifted
Toni spoke and our lives were saved/ Toni listened and we were validated/ She is the breast that fed our union/ Hers’ was the womb of our nourishment.

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