Introducing: Brooke Elise Axtell

April 8, 2013
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Introducing: Brooke Elise Axtell

Brooke Elise Axtell is an award-winning singer, songwriter, poet and performing artist from Austin, Texas. She is the Founder of SHE:Survivor Healing + Empowerment, a healing community for survivors of rape, abuse and sex-trafficking. Brooke is a member of the Speaker’s Bureau for Rape, Abuse, Incest National Network (RAINN), the largest anti-sexual assault organization in the U.S. and recently joined The Truth Panel for The Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives to speak out on...
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Introducing: Monica Torres

April 8, 2013
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Introducing: Monica Torres

Monica Torres is an English and American Studies major who concentrates in Latina/o Studies and is writing her way into a career. As a college senior committed to institutional diversity, most of her battles are fought on paper, online, and in committees. Currently, her thesis is exploring the commodification of Latinidad through experimental fiction. She loves food and feelings, and has written for Creative Loafing Tampa about both. You can find her @MoniFierce and...
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Op-Ed: Where Femen Has Gone Wrong

April 7, 2013
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Op-Ed: Where Femen Has Gone Wrong

By Mohadesa Najumi Femen is a feminist protest group founded in 2008, based in Ukraine. They received international recognition due to their direct and somewhat extreme methods of action. They engage in topless demonstrations, and protests outside of religious institutions and international marriage agencies, while pushing their ideology of the women’s sexual liberation, ‘sextremism’,  to the forefront. Their goal is women’s liberation. So what’s sextremism? According to Femen, it means “to mobilize every cell of...
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Feminism & Me: Name Change, for Love Actually

April 6, 2013
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Feminism & Me: Name Change, for Love Actually

By Nilofar Ansher Does choosing to take on your husband’s name play into the patriarchal injunctions against women’s selfhood?  What follows are questions re: notions of love and whether or not these ideas help cement the tropes of traditions, in this case, of marital name change. One of the oft-rehearsed but exciting conversations that my cousins and I would indulge in during our teenage years revolved around our future husband...
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Cynthia Wachenheim and the Impossible Terrain of Motherhood

April 4, 2013
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Cynthia Wachenheim and the Impossible Terrain of Motherhood

By Alison Piepmeier As Keira Williams wrote here recently, Cynthia Wachenheim killed herself—and attempted to kill her son—because she felt that she’d been a terrible mother.  Williams aptly observes the way in which our culture creates and upholds unrealistic standards of motherhood, the “mommy myth” of the Good Mother.  These sorts of cultural narratives create anxiety and shame among mothers and can provide a context for acts that, as...
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Poetic Justice: Drake and East African Girls

April 3, 2013
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Poetic Justice: Drake and East African Girls

By Safy-Hallan Farah I am an East African Girl. A couple years ago, one of my friends told me that being an East African meant I’m not really black. A visibly mixed-race girl with a “high yellow” complexion and sandy brown hair telling me I’m not black didn’t sit well with me. I wanted to tell the girl, in the words of CB4, I’m black y’all. I’m black like the...
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Op-Ed: Marriage Might Be the End of the Gay Community

March 31, 2013
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Op-Ed: Marriage Might Be the End of the Gay Community

By Jia Hui Lee In these austere times, marriage conveniently allows for managing illness and economic need within the private sphere, as required by contemporary notions of citizenship. Same-sex marriage, likely to soon become federally legal in the United States, might be the beginning of the end for the gay community. No matter how the U.S. Supreme Court will rule on either case, as Megan McArdle writes, “gay marriage...
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Peeking "Behind the Kitchen Door": The Struggle for Food Justice in America's Restaurant Industry

March 30, 2013
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Peeking "Behind the Kitchen Door": The Struggle for Food Justice in America's Restaurant Industry

Last month, Michelle Obama visited a Springfield, Illinois, Wal-Mart to celebrate and highlight its efforts to help Americans eat healthier.  Mrs. Obama announced, “For years, the conventional wisdom said healthy products just didn’t sell. Thanks to Wal-Mart and other companies, we’re proving the conventional wisdom wrong.” If only this neoliberal logic delivered as promised.  As with Michael Bloomberg’s Cola Crusade, the narrow focus on food choices, individual behavior (“Get...
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Defense of Marriage: Racism, Family Values and the 99%

March 27, 2013
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As the lead attorney for Proposition 8 trotted out the standard Christian fascist “marriage is only for procreation” party line before the Supreme Court yesterday, I was reminded of a 2012 Los Angeles Times story about the changing demographics of California families.  The article leads with an idyllic portrait of a white lesbian-headed family whose daughter is asked “on a leafy drive…at a newly renovated home with cathedral ceilings...
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Special Report: The Commission on the Status of Women Comes to an End

March 27, 2013
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Special Report: The Commission on the Status of Women Comes to an End

By Special TFW Correspondent, Mazuba Haanyama The 57th session of the CSW has come to an end. On the 15th of March, the UN member states signed the Agreed Conclusions. This is the document, many have been waiting for and have invested much time and energy lobbying and advocating for. Still, despite the many challenges encountered by growing fundamentalist motions at the CSW, the Agreed Conclusions are complete and ready to use...
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Disclosure

March 26, 2013
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By David J. Malebranche His 26 year old body was calculating comfortable, sprawled over a disheveled collection of towels and sheets constituting a makeshift mattress, littered with blood-tinged gauze pads, a towel soiled with oral secretions and a crusty suction tube. Upon seeing me enter the room, his weary eyes shifted from his digital tablet in my direction and flashed the brightest beams they could muster to engage with...
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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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