The Impostor Syndrome and Me

March 14, 2014
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I am writing to introduce myself. And to try to answer the question, “What am I doing here?” Every time I think up a new essay or story, this question looms in and above the empty Word document.  Whenever I feel like speaking at an event, I wonder what I could possibly add to the conversation.  When I was invited to become a part of the Feminist Wire’s editorial...
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An Interview with Harsha Walia

March 13, 2014
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Harsha Walia

By Erin Durban-Albrecht After reading Undoing Border Imperialisms for a review that appears today at The Feminist Wire, I had a chance to ask the book’s author some questions. Harsha Walia is an author and activist who is formally trained in the law. She immigrated from India and currently resides in Vancouver, on the lands of the Indigenous Coast Salish people, and works as an advocate in the poorest postal code...
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A Review of “Undoing Border Imperialism”

March 13, 2014
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By Erin Durban-Albrecht On the morning of October 11, 2013, activists of all ages in my hometown of Tucson put their bodies on the line—chaining themselves to the front wheels of deportation buses and the gates of the federal courthouse—in order to throw a wrench in the impressive machinery that criminalizes brown and black immigrants in the United States. I participated in the action as a street medic, someone...
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My Grandma’s Blue-Green Eyes Look/Laugh Like

March 11, 2014
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My Grandma’s Blue-Green Eyes Look/Laugh Like

By John Murillo We played Monopoly and I feared the end of the world. This was when Y2K was a thing and I was still jealous of my friends for being members of a club I named in my imagination—the five-foot club. I hated the smallness I felt being short. Midnight approached and the dense, shapeless maw of the apocalypse sucked me in, a big black hole spaghettifying me,...
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Why Sikivu Hutchinson’s Latest Book Is Relevant To an Angry Romani Ex-Muslim

March 10, 2014
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Sikivu Hutchinson

By Maryam Moosan-Clark In Godless Americana: Race and Religious Rebels, Sikivu Hutchinson takes us on a roller coaster ride through the different, interacting forms of underprivilege that affect People of Color in the United States, past and present. Throughout much of the journey, despite giving numerous examples a minority person can relate to, she maintains a measure of intellectual distance necessary for proper analysis. This changes on the final...
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Redefining Realness by Janet Mock (Book Review)

March 7, 2014
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By David B. Green, Jr. I have learned through the process of story telling and sharing that we all come from various walks of life and that doesn’t make any of us less valid. –Janet Mock   To date, there exist only a select number of memoirs written by self-identified Black trans or drag-queen men and women. Amongst these few, they all have rendered narratives that offer public glimpses...
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Nicki Minaj and Pretty Taking All Fades: Performing the Erotics of Feminist Solidarity

March 6, 2014
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By Jillian Hernandez and Anya M. Wallace   This essay aims to consider an erotics of feminist solidarity, not a solidarity that only decries the status quo—but one that recognizes the conditions under which women and girls of color craft their identities and sexualities—and does not punish them for it.  How do we measure women and girls against a feminism that has not (yet) altered the structures of racism,...
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Black History Remix: Nicki Minaj, Self-Defense, and Black Women’s Suppressed Histories

March 6, 2014
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By Janell Hobson   Just a few days before Valentine’s Day and in the midst of Black History Month, pop star and rapper Nicki Minaj released her show-no-love single “Lookin Ass Niggas,” accompanied by a photo-shopped image of an iconically armed Malcolm X peering out the window of his home, prepared to defend himself and his family/womenfolk “by any means necessary.” The image holds deep resonance for the hip-hop...
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Women, Men, Horses, and the Wild, Wild West: An Interview with Deanne Stillman

March 5, 2014
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Women, Men, Horses, and the Wild, Wild West: An Interview with Deanne Stillman

I met Deanne Stillman in September 2013, and it seemed we had a great deal to discuss. We talked on a breezy, warm day at a Starbucks near the University of Arizona campus in Tucson, covering topics ranging from writing, to violence against women, to militarization—all issues of great interest to both of us. She was delightful company, and for months I’ve been hoping to interview her for TFW,...
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New Revolutions? Finding and Naming Them for Transnational Feminisms

March 4, 2014
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By Zillah Eisenstein My writing is a small offering to give political voice to the extra-ordinary attempt at trans-national and cultural and racial and class and gender solidarity. It is to give a public recognition to women doing revolution on behalf of their bodies—sexually, economically, racially, politically. “We” are migrants, middle class, unemployed, poor, hungry, tired, gifted, powerful, indigenous, colored, and we trust each other to stand together against...
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Why Is Academic Writing So Beautiful? Notes on Black Feminist Scholarship

March 4, 2014
By
Angela Davis and Toni Morrison

By Emily Lordi The title of this piece responds to Joshua Rothman’s recent essay for the New Yorker blog, “Why Is Academic Writing So Academic?”, which is itself a response to Nicholas Kristof’s call for academics to engage in public debate. Both Rothman, a writer and editor who considered a career in academia, and Matthew Pratt Guterl, a professor at Brown, have productively moved the Kristof-inspired conversation beyond an...
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