Call for Submissions: TFW Love as a Radical Act Forum

July 9, 2013
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love as a radical act

Times always seem to be especially trying for those of us committed to transnationally eradicating anti-feminist, racist, and imperialist politics both publicly and privately. Like most years, 2013 has been especially challenging, and the year is not yet over. Admittedly, we’ve had a lot to celebrate. For example, Editorial Collective (EC) member Darnell L. Moore helped launch “Ring the Bell,” a movement that combats violence against women, several EC...
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The Downfalls of Feminism and Why I Am Still a Feminist

July 8, 2013
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The Downfalls of Feminism and Why I Am Still a Feminist

By Eren Cervantes-Altamirano I knew I was a feminist when I was in the third grade. Then, I was an aspiring class president in a classroom of 50 students where the majority were women. My opponent was a boy. While I knew I had the best qualities to be class president, I was soon discouraged by my classmates’ and teachers’ attitudes towards women in leadership roles.  Someone asked, “How many female...
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Op-Ed: The Military's Culture of Sexual Violence

July 7, 2013
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Op-Ed: The Military's Culture of Sexual Violence

By Carrie Reed Earlier this year, a monumental announcement came from Department of Defense lifting the ban on women serving in combat roles. However, women have been in combat for years. What’s changed is that they will finally be compensated with combat pay just as every man serving in a combat zone. Coincidentally, only three days before the announcement was made, survivors of military sexual trauma (MST) were sitting...
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Reading Rachel

July 5, 2013
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Reading Rachel

By Rashna Batliwala Singh “Are you listening?” Rachel Jeantel asked defense attorney Don West in the trial of George Zimmerman, as he seemed to turn and walk away from her. As I watched, I somehow felt that Jeantel was asking the question not only of Don West but of everyone out there, and I don’t just mean those in the courtroom. All of a sudden, postcolonial critic Gayatri Spivak’s brilliant but...
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Dispatch from the 'Very House of Difference': Anti-Black Racism and the Expansion of Sexual Citizenship – OR – We Need to Do So Much Better at Loving Each Other

July 4, 2013
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Dispatch from the 'Very House of Difference': Anti-Black Racism and the Expansion of Sexual Citizenship – OR – We Need to Do So Much Better at Loving Each Other

By Kai M. Green and Treva Ellison We (Treva and Kai) are Black, queer, trans, and anti-capitalist scholars, activists, and artists based in Los Angeles, where we dream about and plan for the abolition of racial capitalism and the growth of life-affirming relations and structures. We wrote this piece out of a desire to cultivate and build on conversations about how we can grow trust and solidarity across differences,...
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Paula Deen's Comfort Food

July 3, 2013
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Paula Deen. Paula Deen. From a titan of the down home cooking industry, $17 million dollars strong, with books and TV shows and a product line and restaurants all over the south, Deen has fallen in just the last two weeks to a shamed superstar. After employees charged Deen with racial and gender harassment, and stories of her past use of the n-word have come out, the Food Network...
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Gender, Race, And Going To Class: A Call For A Feminist Reading of For-Profit Colleges?

July 1, 2013
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Most of us have seen the ads exhorting us to “call today!” to start on a new future with a college degree. How many of us have noticed the faces in those ads? The gender, race, and affect of the faces and voices in for-profit college marketing are the kinds of things I  notice in the course of my research about schools like Strayer, Everest, the University of Phoenix...
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Op Ed: Paternalism, Not Protection: A Feminist Reassessment of the Burqa and Niqab

June 30, 2013
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By Aicha Marhfour Yesterday, I opened a Facebook message from an old friend, touched that she was thinking of me after many years. But the feeling quickly turned to surprise as I read the words, “I’m thinking of wearing the niqab, so could you remove the photos of me on your page?” Easily done. But as a moderate Muslim wary of extreme sides of the spectrum, I wanted to...
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Indigenous Women: Never Idle

June 28, 2013
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(Photo by Blaire Russell) Every morning this week I have woken up to my email inbox and social media feed filled with inspiring stories and images of resistance as part of the Idle No More and Defenders of the Land call for Sovereignty Summer. Sovereignty Summer is “a campaign of coordinated non-violent direct actions to promote Indigenous rights and environmental protection in alliance with non-Indigenous supporters.” Colonialism in North...
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Thoughts of My Father: Though They Had Been Drivers They Had To Be Forgiven

June 28, 2013
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Thoughts of My Father: Though They Had Been Drivers They Had To Be Forgiven

By Farah Tanis In this country and throughout slave colonies in the Caribbean, South and Central America and Africa, drivers were those Black slaves whom with overseer status, solidified and affirmed by the whip in their hands, insured the continued enslavement of others around them. When I was five years old my father left me for five years. I say left me because in my child eyes and mind...
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"20 Feet From Stardom" & the Black Female Gaze

June 27, 2013
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"20 Feet From Stardom" & the Black Female Gaze

In the 1972 song “Take a Walk on the Wild Side” Lou Reed evokes the paternalistic image of “colored girls” cooing in the background to a hipster tale of New York debauchery.  Using Reed’s homage as its introduction, white director Morgan Neville’s bittersweet documentary “20 Feet from Stardom” attempts to bring black female back-up singers into the foreground with both moving and problematic effect. From the 1950’s to the...
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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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