Op Ed: Paternalism, Not Protection: A Feminist Reassessment of the Burqa and Niqab

June 30, 2013
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By Aicha Marhfour Yesterday, I opened a Facebook message from an old friend, touched that she was thinking of me after many years. But the feeling quickly turned to surprise as I read the words, “I’m thinking of wearing the niqab, so could you remove the photos of me on your page?” Easily done. But as a moderate Muslim wary of extreme sides of the spectrum, I wanted to...
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Indigenous Women: Never Idle

June 28, 2013
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(Photo by Blaire Russell) Every morning this week I have woken up to my email inbox and social media feed filled with inspiring stories and images of resistance as part of the Idle No More and Defenders of the Land call for Sovereignty Summer. Sovereignty Summer is “a campaign of coordinated non-violent direct actions to promote Indigenous rights and environmental protection in alliance with non-Indigenous supporters.” Colonialism in North...
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Thoughts of My Father: Though They Had Been Drivers They Had To Be Forgiven

June 28, 2013
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Thoughts of My Father: Though They Had Been Drivers They Had To Be Forgiven

By Farah Tanis In this country and throughout slave colonies in the Caribbean, South and Central America and Africa, drivers were those Black slaves whom with overseer status, solidified and affirmed by the whip in their hands, insured the continued enslavement of others around them. When I was five years old my father left me for five years. I say left me because in my child eyes and mind...
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"20 Feet From Stardom" & the Black Female Gaze

June 27, 2013
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"20 Feet From Stardom" & the Black Female Gaze

In the 1972 song “Take a Walk on the Wild Side” Lou Reed evokes the paternalistic image of “colored girls” cooing in the background to a hipster tale of New York debauchery.  Using Reed’s homage as its introduction, white director Morgan Neville’s bittersweet documentary “20 Feet from Stardom” attempts to bring black female back-up singers into the foreground with both moving and problematic effect. From the 1950’s to the...
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In Conversation: On the Landmark SCOTUS Decisions, Single-Variable Politics and Movement Forward

June 26, 2013
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In Conversation: On the Landmark SCOTUS Decisions, Single-Variable Politics and Movement Forward

By Timothy Patrick McCarthy and Darnell L. Moore Darnell: Tim, You have spoken and written publicly about the need—particularly on the part of white and economically privileged LGBT people—to resist hasty celebration of the DOMA decision, given the U.S. Supreme Court’s rulings on other landmark civil rights cases this week. Can you say a bit more about that, and the politics that you maintain as a white gay man, which influences...
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Equity at the Peril of Normativity: A Feminist Anthropological Take on Race, Marriage and Justice

June 26, 2013
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Equity at the Peril of Normativity: A Feminist Anthropological Take on Race, Marriage and Justice

By Dana-Ain Davis and Christa Craven Anthropologists take up many of the same issues as the Supreme Court–race, family and kinship, and historical inequities.  The difference is we don’t step into our controversies so quickly.  Our fieldwork process, which often lasts years, allows us critical time to mull things over and consider crucial nuances in the lives of those impacted by policy and legal decisions. Anthropology offers perspectives that...
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Is a picture worth a 1000 words? Race and the politics of mourning

June 26, 2013
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Is a picture worth a 1000 words? Race and the politics of mourning

Hank Willis Thomas A couple weeks back, Melissa Harris Perry and her guests discussed the power of images, focusing on the debate as to whether or not the public should see images of Newtown violence.  While recognizing the pain and difficulty for the Newtown parents, each seemed to conclude the stakes were too high and that the public needed to see the images. Michael Skolnick called upon Connecticut Gov....
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Against Patriarchy: Tools for Men to Further Feminist Revolution*

June 25, 2013
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Against Patriarchy: Tools for Men to Further Feminist Revolution*

By Chris Crass For all of us who are men who believe in social justice, who want healthy and beautiful lives for our loved ones, and who are working for positive change in the world, let us commit or re-commit to making feminism central in our lives, values, and actions.  Black feminist scholar bell hooks writes, “When women and men understand that working to eradicate patriarchal domination is a...
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Somebody Confiscated My Field Notes: Reflections on Occupied Palestine

June 24, 2013
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Somebody Confiscated My Field Notes: Reflections on Occupied Palestine

By Erica Lorraine Williams  This May, I traveled to Occupied Palestine to participate in a faculty development seminar that involved visiting universities in East Jerusalem, Bethlehem, Ramallah, Nablus and Hebron. As an anthropologist who has spent a lot of time in Latin America, I was thrilled at the prospect of traveling to a region where I had no previous experience and limited prior knowledge. I felt the need to...
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Paula Cooper, Masked Racism, and Prison Education: Reflections on Neoliberalism and the Prison Industrial Complex

June 24, 2013
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Paula Cooper, Masked Racism, and Prison Education: Reflections on Neoliberalism and the Prison Industrial Complex

By j.n. salters More and more I find myself questioning the kind of democracy we live in. I have just turned on the television to discover that at least 46 people were shot over the weekend of June 16, 2013 in Chicago—America’s third-world “Windy City” whose murder rate tops the Afghanistan death toll. The same city that is closing 54 public schools. I open the newspaper to learn that...
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The Princesses of Long Island: A Long Hard Post-Feminist Look in the Mirror

June 24, 2013
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By Shoshanna R. Schechter-Shaffin Like blogger Lindsey Orlofsky, I too watched Bravo’s new series “The Princesses of Long Island” in horror. For those of you who have yet to catch the latest offering of Bravo’s reality machine, The Princesses of Long Island focuses on six Jewish college educated wealthy women in their late twenties from Long Island, NY. Almost all of the young women portrayed are still living at...
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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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