The Reception of Audre Lorde – The Berlin Years 1984 to 1992 – Voices From Around The World

February 18, 2014
By
Audre Lorde and Dagmar Schultz
Image copyright, Dagmar Schultz

By Dagmar Schultz With this contribution I want to relate a few of the many voices that illuminated Audre Lorde’s impact after viewing the film“Audre Lorde – The Berlin Years 1984 to 1992.” When Audre first arrived in Berlin in 1984, I was the co-publisher of Orlanda Press (then sub rosa Frauenverlag) and we published several of Audre’s books in German. She came to Berlin each year until 1992 (except...
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Poem for Audre Lorde

February 18, 2014
By
Audre Lorde
copyright Dagmar Schultz

By asha bandele Author’s note: Audre Lorde was my teacher and my mentor. This poem, written two years after her transition into the Spirit world, is an edited version of a piece that initially appeared in my first book, Absence in the Palms of My Hands, which was dedicated to Audre.     Sometimes I still see you BlackUnicorn riding the edge of the wind Head tilted upward And...
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COLLEGE FEMINISMS: Continuation in Death: Generous Inspiration from the Warrior Poet

February 18, 2014
By
Morgen Snowadzky

By Morgen Snowadzky It may seem incorrect to talk about death for a birthday celebration. I believe that we must embrace death to appreciate life. Contemporary America tends to have an awkward relationship with death. It causes people to fumble around emotions they aren’t used to dealing with in an often sterile world that teaches a desensitization to killing but has little grasp on dying. Instead of understanding and...
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For Lucia Mcbath, Sybrina Fulton and All Other Black Mothers Who’ve Considered Righteous Rage When Black Respectability Politics Ain’t Enough

February 16, 2014
By
For Lucia Mcbath, Sybrina Fulton and All Other Black Mothers Who’ve Considered Righteous Rage When Black Respectability Politics Ain’t Enough

In “What is this “black” in black popular culture? (Rethinking Race),” the late, great cultural theorist Stuart Hall, poignantly asks, “What sort of moment is this?” I’ve wrestled with this question for at least a decade. Though Hall’s “moment” reflects a struggle over cultural hegemony – the need to make room in critical discourses on transnational blackness for meanings inclusive of, yet, beyond U.S. centric white racial politics, the...
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Feminists We Love: In Praise of Black Women Teachers

February 14, 2014
By
Black Math teacher & student

Editors Note: Instead of focusing on one or two specific Feminists We Love, this Valentines Day we highlight a photo-documentary project that uplifts progressive African-American teachers who are “on the frontlines of feminist change.” A Photo-documentary project Even though they might not label themselves as such, progressive African American women teachers are often on the frontlines of feminist change.  They are largely unsung, yet devoted to a radical vision...
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On Michael Sam Coming Out

February 13, 2014
By
Kopay and Sam

By Cheryl Cooky Nearly a year ago today, I was invited to deliver a lecture to the students at Wabash College (a small, all-male, liberal arts College in central Indiana) on the issue of homophobia in sport. This was part of the lead up to Wabash College’s performance of Richard Greenberg‘s Tony-Award winning play Take Me Out. The play was originally staged in 2002, and tells the story of...
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Personal is Political: Sexual Identity and “Nigerian Culture”

February 13, 2014
By
AfroOdyssey IV: 100 Years Later, Confession Booth. Performers Lindsey Bauer and Olushola A. Cole

By Adejoke Tugbiyele I was born in Brooklyn, New York to Nigerian parents.  Like most children of immigrants, it became clear to me that survival depended on how well I could code-switch between American and Nigerian culture.  At home, I was discouraged from talking back or speaking up.  At school, lack of participation could negatively affect my grade. As a young woman, cultural lines became even more defined. I...
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Excerpts from “Let Her: Words, Matter” by Ames Hawkins

February 12, 2014
By
Excerpts from “Let Her: Words, Matter” by Ames Hawkins

I. Julie punched the buttons on the radio, hard double-clicks, propelling the station marker back and forth between the rock and roll of WLLZ and WRIF, between “Detroit’s Wheels” and the “Home of Rock and Roll, Baby.”  I watched as she and Catherine, who sat shotgun, talked about boys—well, men really—the men each of them had been with on the choir trip that past summer, the one I had...
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Personal is Political: Open Letter to Dylan Farrow

February 11, 2014
By
Dylan Farrow

TRIGGER WARNING: This letter includes descriptions of sexual abuse. Dear Dylan, My father worships Woody Allen. Until I read your letter yesterday, I never understood exactly why. You see, when Allen assaulted you in 1992, my own father had just barely escaped criminal charges for molesting me. A child psychologist decided that the evidence of abuse was conclusive, but my father intimidated her with death threats and claimed that...
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TFW at Black Women’s Blueprint’s Fourth Annual Mother Tongue Monologues

February 10, 2014
By
Darnell L. Moore, First Lady of New York Chirlane McCray, and Aishah Shahidah Simmons at Mother Tongue Monologues 2014

On Saturday, February 8, 2014, Black Women’s Blueprint hosted their Fourth Annual Mother Tongue Monologues for Truth Bearing Women, for Emerging Sons, and Other Keepers of the Flame in the Iris and B. Cantor Auditorium at the Brooklyn Museum in New York. This year’s honorees were Barbara Smith – veteran Black feminist, Activist, Independent Scholar, Publisher of Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press (the first women of color owned...
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Op Ed: It’s Time to Answer the Call for Mobile Education

February 10, 2014
By
Image credit: http://www.appwrap.org/mobile-phones-fight-womens-illiteracy-in-afghanistan/

By Laura Odenthal As ringtones interrupt class and texting diverts attention, it is no wonder that many teachers view cell phones as a classroom distraction. But when looked at in a different way, cell phones can provide transformational learning in places when formal classroom settings may not be available. For students in the developing world, education may no longer be tethered to a physical classroom. In places like Afghanistan,...
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