Assata Shakur: She Who Struggles

July 13, 2013
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By Luam Kidane Assata Shakur. she who struggles. Assata Shakur. she who struggles for rupture from colonized thought patterns. thought patterns choreographed to the legacies of the multi-headed monster of patriarchy, heteronormativity, and anti-Black racism. Assata Shakur. she who struggles to shatter conditioning that allows for Black ancestral histories to be held in the same breath as broken, wrong, ruin, unworthy. Assata Shakur. she who struggles so we are...
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Criminalizing Human Rights Work: Assata and the Incarceration of Black Women

July 13, 2013
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By Meron Wondwosen In 1918, one year shy of turning 20 and eight months pregnant, Mary Turner was terrorized by a white lynch mob who hung her upside down, shot her, set her on fire, cut out her fetus, and stomped her baby to death. This Black woman’s crime was speaking out against the mob that lynched her husband. In an act of self-determination and resistance, she declared that...
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What Assata Means to Me….

July 12, 2013
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By Layla Kristy Feghali                                                                    “i have been locked by the lawless. Handcuffed by the haters. Gagged by the greedy. And, if i know anything at all, it’s that a wall is just a wall and nothing more at all. It can be broken down. i believe in living i believe in birth. i believe in the sweat of love and in the fire of truth.” - Assata Shakur Assata...
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Assata, Radicalism and Love

July 12, 2013
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By Jessica Horn To meditate on the meaning of Assata Shakur is to meditate on the meaning of a vibrant tradition of revolutionary black women’s thought and action, and how it has shaped our sense of what it means to be gendered beings in societies framed by multiple injustices. My own feminist politics evolved through an immersion in the introspective words and equally profound deeds of African American feminist...
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Guided Home to Port: Assata Shakur, State Terror, and Black Resistance

July 11, 2013
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By Connie Wun Domestic Terror:  On May 2, 2013, the FBI placed Assata Shakur on its Most Wanted Terrorist list and, with the help of the New Jersey state police, has increased its reward to $2 million for information leading to her arrest. According to the FBI’s website, individuals placed on the list “remain wanted in connection with their alleged crimes until such time as the charges are dropped...
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Celebrating Assata Shakur and the Black Radical Tradition

July 11, 2013
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Assata Shakur’s political thought and activism has captured the imagination of artists, activists, women and men around the world.  As African activists, we have learned from Assata that the history of African peoples’ does not begin or end with colonialism and slavery but rather with centuries of creation, building, and life.  Similarly, Assata’s own story is shaped and made Black because of the journey which she has travelled as a...
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3 Reasons Why You Should Be Paying Attention to Moral Mondays in North Carolina

July 10, 2013
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“Grotesque” is the word the New York Times used in an editorial today to describe North Carolina politics. I can think of some others. In many ways, what’s happening in North Carolina is not entirely different from what is happening in places all over the country. In North Carolina as in other places, legislators are investing immense time and resources on abortion policy that intervenes in “problems” that are...
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My Tattoos are Not an Invitation

July 10, 2013
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By Audrey Lundahl As a Coloradoan now living in Texas, the summer temperatures are trying. One way I cope is wearing heat-appropriate clothing. Wearing my sleeveless tops and dresses brings my full sleeve tattoo on my right arm to prominence. The reactions to this tattoo have been varied, from disapproving looks, questions about what it means, yells of “Nice tattoo!” or “Badass sleeve!” or even unwarranted touching and grabbing...
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On Love, Empathy, and Pleasure in the Age of Neoliberalism

July 9, 2013
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In this, the age of late capital and neoliberalism, numbness is desired and the erotic is feared. Audre Lorde aptly deemed this the “fear of feeling” in her now classic essay, “Uses of the erotic: the erotic as power.” In the essay, Lorde presages a future in which the “good” is commodified—a future where the doing of “the good” is trivialized and emptied of deep feeling, sensation, connection to...
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Call for Submissions: TFW Love as a Radical Act Forum

July 9, 2013
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love as a radical act

Times always seem to be especially trying for those of us committed to transnationally eradicating anti-feminist, racist, and imperialist politics both publicly and privately. Like most years, 2013 has been especially challenging, and the year is not yet over. Admittedly, we’ve had a lot to celebrate. For example, Editorial Collective (EC) member Darnell L. Moore helped launch “Ring the Bell,” a movement that combats violence against women, several EC...
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The Downfalls of Feminism and Why I Am Still a Feminist

July 8, 2013
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The Downfalls of Feminism and Why I Am Still a Feminist

By Eren Cervantes-Altamirano I knew I was a feminist when I was in the third grade. Then, I was an aspiring class president in a classroom of 50 students where the majority were women. My opponent was a boy. While I knew I had the best qualities to be class president, I was soon discouraged by my classmates’ and teachers’ attitudes towards women in leadership roles.  Someone asked, “How many female...
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Arts & Culture

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

  • I’ve Got Something To Say About This: A Survival Incantation Kate Rushin
credit/copyright: Rachel Eliza Griffiths

    Kate Rushin: I see the whole thing played out. I’m bludgeoned, bloody, raped. My story is reduced to filler buried in the back of the paper, on page 49, and I say, “No. No way.”

  • what is left M. Nzadi Keita
photograph: ©Elizabeth Ho

    M. Nzadi Keita: what you remember/ starts with a smile/ a raw edge/ a single snip/ from the someone dead

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