The White Family: A Case for National Action

June 16, 2014
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The White Family: A Case for National Action

In the recent swirl of epic violence, mayhem and gun-besotted hysteria that has become the lifeblood of corporate media, no one is asking about the problem of white families. In 1965, then Assistant Secretary of Labor Daniel Patrick Moynihan published a landmark study on the “problem” of the black family. It was the year of the Watts Rebellion and the passage of the Voting Rights Act, two events that...
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It’s Bigger Than Jamal Bryant…

June 6, 2014
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It’s Bigger Than Jamal Bryant…

We interrupt our summer break to bring you this article, in light of recent events within black religion and black popular culture. This is not breaking news. However, in view of the interview that I did on Huff Post Live yesterday, I thought an expansion of context was immediately necessary. Recently, in a sermon to his predominantly black congregation, pastor Jamal H. Bryant appropriated troubled singer Chris Brown’s song, Loyal. To be sure,...
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The Feminist Wire’s 1st Annual Poetry Contest

June 2, 2014
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The Feminist Wire’s 1st Annual Poetry Contest

Submissions are now open for The Feminist Wire’s 1st Annual Poetry Contest, judged by Evie Shockley. The winner will receive publication in The Feminist Wire and $200. The 1st runner up will receive publication in The Feminist Wire and $100. All submissions will be judged anonymously and considered for future publication in TFW. Additionally, we are excited to announce that Kore Press will publish the winning poem or poems in the form...
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200 Black Men Ask POTUS: What About Our Sisters?

May 30, 2014
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Credit: Official White House Photo from Whitehouse.gov)

Today, the White House released a report that was spearheaded by an interagency task force organized to advise President Obama on the My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) policy initiative. Announcing the Initiative in February, Mr. Obama expressed hope that, “By focusing on the critical challenges, risk factors, and opportunities for boys and young men of color at key life stages, we can improve their long-term outcomes and ability to contribute to the...
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Kara Walker and the Sweet Taste of Gentrification

May 30, 2014
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New York City is always changing.  New York neighborhoods, too.  It is not a new story: an underserved neighborhood draws (with inexpensive rent) artists, young people, strivers.  This migration drives a rich arts scene. And, art sells. Many of these NYC neighborhoods were vibrant communities for people of color before the (mostly white) artists arrived.  But with the white folks comes perceived (white) safety.  Then comes the real money, the...
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Dancing While Black

May 30, 2014
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My friend read the letters DWB on my computer screen, assumed they were the acronym for “driving while black” and wondered what racial profiling had to do with the corresponding photos of black women caught in mid-motion, arms extended, faces to the sky. I told her that DWB is Paloma McGregor’s latest initiative and creative brain (and body) child: Dancing While Black. Paloma, formerly a dancer with Urban Bush...
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Dismantle: Let Me Break It Down

May 29, 2014
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Dismantle: Let Me Break It Down

A Review of Dismantle: An Anthology of Writing from the VONA/Voices Writing Workshop ed. Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela (Philadelphia: Thread Makes Blanket Press 2014) The first anthology of creative writing by students and faculty of the Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation is called Dismantle.   Following in the tradition of the Cave Canem poetry foundation and the Kundiman collective, a set of voices of writers of color who have shared workshop space, if not...
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Why Women Will Lead the Way on Gun Reform

May 29, 2014
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Memorial to Isla Vista Shooting Victims (Photo Credit: CNN)

By Hollye Dexter What woke me that summer morning in 1978 was the screaming. I didn’t know it was my mother’s voice. I’d never heard a sound like that come out of her. I ran into the living room to find my seven-year-old brother Christopher covered in blood. He had just been shot in the head by a neighborhood kid playing with his dad’s gun. Christopher was in the...
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Internalized Misogyny within the Geek Community

May 28, 2014
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By Desiree Rodriguez When geek culture started to truly flourish with the increasing profitability of superhero movies, supernaturally based TV shows, and renewed interest in the science fiction and fantasy genres, new fans started pouring in. The effect of social media is a large community of fans — or fandom. Keeping in contact, planning events, having meet-and-greets, and developing friendships has become a staple of online fandoms. Sharing theories on...
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Demeter Press at Risk of Closing: Is Motherhood a Feminist Issue Worthy of Support?

May 27, 2014
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Demeter Press

By Christine H. Morton Do we need a feminist movement for mothers? Do motherhood scholars need their own association and publisher? Andrea O’Reilly, founder of Demeter Press, the first book publisher focused specifically on the topic of mothering/ motherhood, says we do, and she calls it matricentric feminism. Demeter Press has published books on several facets of motherhood, and future titles include: Muslim Mothering, Mothering and Performance, Black Motherhoods,...
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An Alert: Capital is Intersectional; Radicalizing Piketty’s Inequality

May 26, 2014
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An Alert: Capital is Intersectional; Radicalizing Piketty’s Inequality

By Zillah Eisenstein When civil rights activists speak about race they are told they need to think about class as well. When anti-racist feminists focus on the problems of gendered racism they are also told to include class.  So—I will continue this discussion with: when formulating class inequality one should have race and gender in view as well. Capital is intersectional.  It always intersects with the bodies that produce...
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Arts & Culture

  • “Paws” by Tracy Burkholder tracy

    Paws   In sixth grade, I started to envy certain girls’ hands. Not always manicured, but always neat. Fingers thin and smooth. These hands gently freed sheets of paper from their metal spirals and lifted loops of hair to more beautiful perches. Lunch trays floated inside their gentle grip while […]

  • 3 Poems by Holly Mitchell holly

    Slipping Under   Like a ghost, I prepare a bath behind a door   that hasn’t locked long as I remember.   When my mother or grandmother knocks at the open door,   I obscure what they call my “new breasts” under the soap water   and focus on the […]

  • Excerpts from Damnation by Janice Lee janice

    CONFESSION Sometimes one willingly enters a dark and empty space, the creaking of the loose boards below, the phantom moonlight above. · I had a dream that I was carrying a wounded deer in my arms. He lay there limp, depending on me completely and solely for the permission to […]