Mumia Abu-Jamal on Martin Luther King, Women, and the Movement

January 20, 2014
By
Mumia Abu-Jamal III

The Feminist Wire Exclusive: Mumia Abu-Jamal offers a timely message for Martin Luther King Day that addresses the gender politics of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements as well as the need for prison abolition, ending violence against women and girls of color, and fighting for LGBT rights. Hear Mumia’s other commentaries at Prison Radio.     Get involved with the Free Mumia Movement: Visit the Bring Mumia...
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Because Someday Someone Should Ask, “Do You Remember Where You Were When Amiri Baraka Died?”

January 17, 2014
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Amiri Baraka Died

By khoLi All those major events we lived through. If we responded to them as conscious Black intellectuals, we had to try to become soldiers ourselves. That is why we wrote the way we did, because we wanted to. —Amiri Baraka Do not leave the arena to the fools. —Toni Cade Bambara Amiri Baraka has died. I am currently writing a dissertation, “Running Out of Time: Radicalism, Resistance, and the Future of...
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Feminist Football Fan: Reflections from the 12th Woman

January 17, 2014
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Feminist Football Fan: Reflections from the 12th Woman

By Kimberly George My feminism and my love of football have a complicated relationship. When I was eight and watching Dave Krieg, Steve Largent, and my beloved Seattle Seahawks, I dreamed of being the first female player in the NFL.  It felt unjust to me that no women were allowed in, and I wanted to be the first. My ever-supportive mother suggested I could one day be a kicker...
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Trans Is the New Black?: On CeCe McDonald, Mister Cee, Orange Is The New Black, and Trans Women of Color

January 16, 2014
By
McDonald

By Jasmine Salters Last week, the appearance of Orange Is the New Black actress Laverne Cox and former RuPaul’s Drag Race contestant and trans model Carmen Carrerra on Katie Couric’s ABC daytime show Katie sparked important dialogue about transgender individuals. When Couric asked the women invasive questions about transitioning and surgery, Cox powerfully deconstructed the ways in which fixation on the bodies of transgender people distracts from their material realities. “By focusing on bodies,”...
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Patriarchal PONTIFICATIONS, and the Problem of “Justice”

January 14, 2014
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Patriarchal PONTIFICATIONS, and the Problem of “Justice”

By Zillah Eisenstein Pope Francis criticizes unbridled capitalism for its injustice.  He has been applauded widely and loudly for this and he should be. But a critique of unbridled patriarchy and misogyny is needed as well, from both him and his many supporters, especially progressives around the world, if a meaningful “justice” is to be found.  It is common knowledge that the majority of the poor across the globe,...
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The Sexual Geopolitics of Popular Culture and Transnational Black Feminism

January 13, 2014
By
Knowles-Adichie

By Janell Hobson While the debate raged on toward the end of 2013 concerning Beyoncé’s feminist politics – especially in her sampling of celebrated Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s “We Should All Be Feminists” TED speech in her song “***Flawless,” featured on her fast-selling BEYONCÈ: The Visual Album – few have contributed conversations on the potential for a transnational black feminist consciousness that this sampling promises. Notably, Aljazeera America...
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Queer African Reader: A Review

January 9, 2014
By
queer african reader

By Rita Nketiah and Rose Afriyie In the past decade, African sexual minorities have received increasing attention. 2013 alone saw numerous headlines most notably around  the murder of activist Eric Lembembe in Cameroon and the passage of  the “Anti-Homesexuality” and “Same Sex Marriage Prohibition” bills in Uganda and Nigeria respectively. But there is much more to Queer rights in Africa than murder and policy advocacy.  For example, most mainstream...
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Introducing: Heather M. Turcotte

January 8, 2014
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Introducing: Heather M. Turcotte

Heather M. Turcotte is committed to anti-oppressive transnational feminist approaches to decolonizing academia, the interstate system and daily exchange. She received her PhD from the University of California, Santa Cruz in Politics and Feminist Studies and is currently a joint-appointed assistant professor in Political Science and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Connecticut. She chairs the New England Women’s Studies Association and co-chairs the Anti-White Supremacy Taskforce...
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Introducing: Stephanie Gilmore

January 8, 2014
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Introducing: Stephanie Gilmore

Stephanie Gilmore is an award-winning educator, writer, editor, and activist. She holds a Ph.D. in comparative women’s history from The Ohio State University, where she divided her time as a research assistant in Key West, FL and a managing editor for the Journal of Women’s History. After spending eight years in the academic world, she left and decided to dedicate her passion and talent to ending sexual violence on college...
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Introducing: Duchess Harris

January 8, 2014
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Introducing: Duchess Harris

Duchess Harris is the author of two books, Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clinton/Obama (Palgrave Macmillan) and an edited volume with Bruce Baum, Racially Writing the Republic: Racists, Race Rebels, and Transformations of American Identity (Duke University Press). Professor Harris was a Mellon Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. She graduated from PENN in 1991 with a degree in American History and Afro-American Studies. Six years later, she earned a Ph.D. in American Studies...
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Introducing: Kai M. Green

January 8, 2014
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Introducing: Kai M. Green

Kai M. Green is a writer, scholar, poet, filmmaker, abolitionist, feminist and whatever else it takes to make a way towards a new and more just world. He examines questions of gendered and racialized violence in his art and scholarship. His film, “It Gets Messy in Here,” examines the lives of transgender men and masculine identified women of color and their bathroom experiences. Kai is a PhD candidate in the...
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Arts & Culture

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

  • I’ve Got Something To Say About This: A Survival Incantation Kate Rushin
credit/copyright: Rachel Eliza Griffiths

    Kate Rushin: I see the whole thing played out. I’m bludgeoned, bloody, raped. My story is reduced to filler buried in the back of the paper, on page 49, and I say, “No. No way.”

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