Op-Ed: Law Enforcement Violence Against Black Women

September 15, 2013
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law enforcement violence against Black women

Tasasha Henderson Many of us know and remember the names of Sean Bell, Oscar Grant, and Kimani Gray, all young, Black men who were murdered by law enforcement. But how many of us know the names Rekia Boyd, Tarika Wilson, and Aiyana Stanley Jones, young Black women and girls murdered by law enforcement? The list of Black boys, men, girls, and women brutalized and murdered by law enforcement in...
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The Cape May Cross Culture Ferry

September 14, 2013
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Cape May Cross Culture Ferry

By Angela Dicks On July 6th, I traveled with my new wife, Kelly, from Washington D.C. to Cape May, N.J., for a short honeymoon. It was a long trip, not so much in miles as in traffic and time spent waiting to move. After the constipation of cars leading up to the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, traffic flow moved pretty quickly. By early evening, we had finally reached the Rehoboth/Cape...
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Feminist Cage Fight

September 13, 2013
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Feminist Cage Fight

By Darlena Cunha Welcome to the UFC’s (Unified Feminists Championship) main event tonight, folks. Refereeing this good match is the esteemed bell hooks, known for her accessibility and sharp wit. In the red corner, we’ve got Merri Lisa Johnson, standing for postmodern feminist scholars who promote individual choice as a progressive alternative to radical feminism. In the blue corner, Angela McRobbie heralds third-wave feminists who align their views with...
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Abused Goddesses, Orientalism and the Glamorization of Gender-Based Violence

September 12, 2013
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Abused Goddesses, Orientalism and the Glamorization of Gender-Based Violence

By Sayantani DasGupta The Abused Goddesses of India. The advertisements, created by Mumbai-based ad firm Taproot India, have been making the rounds – not only of my Facebook friends’ walls, but of many a feminist and progressive site including Bust, Ultraviolet, V-Day and MediaWatch, usually along with reactions like “powerful” and “heartbreaking.” The images are unusual in their aesthetic appeal. After all, it’s not every day that you see...
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How To Forgive Abortion When You Are the Aborter

September 10, 2013
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How to Forgive Abortion When You Are the Aborter

Andria Nacina Cole I imagine there are many feminists who would like to mourn an abortion but are afraid to do so, because to admit sadness over that decision would fuel the other side. I call bullshit. The pro-choice movement exists so that we might do what we please with our bodies and navigate the consequences–joyous or painful–on our own terms. This essay-poem is a recipe of sorts, for figuring out the pain...
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We Can’t Afford to Hate: A Conclusion to the “Love as a Radical Act” Forum

September 9, 2013
By
progressive radical love

“Darnell, I don’t know if I can do this.” It was July 13. The Zimmerman verdict had just been read. Not guilty. My heart, body, and mind swelled with anger, hate, sadness, confusion, frustration, and despair. I felt defeated. I cried throughout the rest of the night. Our “Love as a Radical Act” forum submission deadline was less than a month away, and I was no longer sure that...
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I Loves ME Some ME!: Karima Amin on Love and Restorative Justice

September 9, 2013
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restorative justice

By Karima Amin It has taken me a long time to say those words and really mean them. At age 66, loving ME is a fundamental feeling that I must acknowledge and feed every single day. I love my family. I love my community. I love my Sista-friends…and I love myself. Knowing that love for self allows me to love all others and enables me to get the job...
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Stop and Frisk: Violence Subsidies and the Myth of Order

September 9, 2013
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Stop and Frisk: Violence Subsidies and the Myth of Order

By Roberto E. Alejandro In a scene from 1952′s High Noon, Gary Cooper’s Marshal Kane enters the town parish in the hopes of recruiting deputies to help him fend off the soon-to-arrive “bad guy” Frank Miller. The scene begins with a long shot of the church, Kane, his back to the camera, walking towards it. The Western has, for a long time, held a place of prominence in the...
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I Love So That I May Teach

September 8, 2013
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healing, forgiving, and teaching

By Linh Hua In July 2008, my last formal teacher was brutally murdered. The formulation of that sentence—the recognition of that particular loss—only just recently became possible for me. My memories of the few years following his death are vague at best. I experienced my grief deeply and palpably, feeling the brokenness of my heart all the time. Like many of his students, I grew to love and admire...
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Op-Ed: You’re Pregnant? What a Shame!

September 8, 2013
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A feminist op-ed on pregnancy, shame, and appropriate responses to life choices; child-free and unmarried by choice; pregnant.

By Laura Phelps If you’re an English language teacher, like me, you’ll be familiar with the concept of adjacency pairs. These are call-and-response phrases that occur in conversation, like “How are you?” “Fine, thanks.” which are more or less fixed. It’s not really an option to bring up the tenner you think you might have lost on the bus and the gerbil’s worsening conjunctivitis; you are always “fine.”’ Another...
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Earle J. Fisher on Love as a Radical Act

September 8, 2013
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love that liberates

By Rev. Earle J. Fisher Sadly, it seems that love has become synonymous with cheap and self-centered lust. Radical individualism has overridden communal and corporate compassion. This is what makes pure and loving expressions radical praxis in contemporary culture. The litmus test between love and lust, however, is pain.  Love, in practice, propels us past painful instances and creates passionate infrastructures. Love that liberates us to be free and yet...
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Arts & Culture

  • Excerpts from In the Away Time by Kristen Nelson kristen

    . January You called me She instead of You. “Where is she going now?” is the first question you ever asked me. You were standing on a porch next to the last She who you broke. I remember looking up at you over my shoulder and smiling. I was going skinny-dipping. […]

  • Poems for Ferguson: Vanessa Huang and Aya de Leon Michael-Brown-Ferguson-Missouri-Shooting-Petition-Racism-america_2014-08-15_17-44-22

    Two poets consider Michael Brown, Ferguson, MO, and the crucial ways in which Black Life Matters.     How Do I Love Thee? A love poem from the Ferguson, MO police dept to Black residents: An informal emulation of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Sonnet 43 by Aya de Leon . How […]

  • “Paws” by Tracy Burkholder tracy

    Paws   In sixth grade, I started to envy certain girls’ hands. Not always manicured, but always neat. Fingers thin and smooth. These hands gently freed sheets of paper from their metal spirals and lifted loops of hair to more beautiful perches. Lunch trays floated inside their gentle grip while […]