Table of Contents for "A Celebration of Assata and the Black Radical Tradition"

July 16, 2013
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Here is a list of the articles that appeared in our forum, “Celebrating Assata Shakur and the Black Radical Tradition,” offered with gratitude to each of the authors– Hakima Abbas, Connie Wun, Jessica Horn, Layla Kristy Feghali, Meron Wondwosen, Luam Kidane, Mazuba Haanyama, Wangui Kimani, Christine Ohenewah, Darol Kay, Amira Davis, Athi Mongezeleli Joja, Happy Mwende Kinyili, Amina Doherty, Safiya Olugbala, Tamara Curl-Green, Randall C. Bailey, Liz Derias, Quincy...
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Conclusion: Shakur or, a Primer on the Difference between Morality and Ethics

July 16, 2013
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for LC and TD All that you meet are thieves: to Athens go, Break open shops; nothing can you steal, But thieves do lose it — William Shakespeare, Timon of Athens (Act 4, Scene 3) The underground railroad on an uprise This time the truth’s gettin told, heard enough lies I told em fight back, attack on society If this is violence, then violent’s what I gotta be – ...
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Assata IS Free

July 16, 2013
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By Safiya Olugbala We would meet in the dreamworld where it was safe for me to ask you anything and no one would hear the answers but me. In this far off place where the Nile murmured in the distance and the air was ripe with the scent of freedom, you would fill my head with stories of revolution. We would huddle together in a secluded corner away from...
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What Will It Take to Free Our Political Prisoners?

July 16, 2013
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By Liz Derias The Malcolm X Grassroots Movement (MXGM), a revolutionary organization based in the u.s. that fights to uphold the self-determination and the human rights of Black people in the world, has been working to free political prisoners for over three decades. The organization has actively worked on the cases of Assata Shakur, Mumia Abu-Jamal, Geronimo ji Jaga Pratt, the San Francisco 8 (SF8), the MOVE 9, the...
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Dear Assata…

July 16, 2013
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By Tamara Curl-Green Dear Assata, I would like to let you know that your story sparked a change in my life. It was frightening and inspiring all at once. My political beliefs were maturing before this point but I’ll never forget the day I became familiar with your story. A senior at my university (I was a sophomore) did a research project entitled “Re-Examining Assata Shakur: Political Terrorist or...
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We are Assata

July 16, 2013
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Quincy Scott Jones   We are braces and birthdays weekend barbeques commuter traffic and job interviews   beauty salon barber shops the doorbell on a first date healthcare homeless vets rising murder rate   We are “Killer Wanted” We are post no bail come home honey go directly to jail   We are warning lynchings and church fire bombs charred black child cross in her palm   We are...
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What Assata Shakur Means to Me

July 16, 2013
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By Randall C. Bailey As I have reviewed the life of Assata Shakur, I am reminded of the history of Black struggles in the US and globally and the ways in which Black women have stood up and have courageously worked for the liberation of our people living under genocidal conditions and institutions.  Her joining forces with Black men modeled how not only racism has to be deconstructed but...
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Coming Home.

July 15, 2013
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By Happy Mwende Kinyili My name is Mwende and I am a woman. These identities – woman, Kamba, young, sweet – have come easy to me. I didn’t need to meditate upon them so as to find them within the very soul of my being – or something transcendental like that. I just was. Oh, for a (definitive) moment, Christian was another identity that rolled off my lips easily...
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The Black as the Thing in Deck-Erinnerung

July 15, 2013
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By Athi Mongezeleli Joja “For the Negro who works on a sugar plantation in Le Robert, there is only one solution: to fight.” – Frantz Fanon In Psychoanalysis, the term Deck-Erinnerung (screen memory), introduced by Sigmund Freud, is basically an arbitrary image that stands in as a reminder of the unsettling otherness that must be kept at a safe distance. It is an ersatz whose ostensible substitutional use is...
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What Assata Means to Me

July 15, 2013
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By Amira Davis  The assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., was, for me, a politicizing moment. It was then I realized, you could die for being Black. I was 11 years old at the time. I became increasingly  militant through my junior high school years so that by the time I entered high school and took a Black History class, a profile picture I had drawn of Angela Davis...
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An Open Love Note to My Son: On Mourning, Love, and Black Motherhood

July 14, 2013
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By Christen Smith Raising Black children – female and male – in the mouth of a racist, sexist, suicidal dragon is perilous and chancy. If they cannot love and resist at the same time, they will probably not survive. And in order to survive they must let go. This is what mothers teach – love, survival… (Audre Lorde, “Man Child” in Sister Outsider, 1984) When I was pregnant with...
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