Silencing the Record: Misrepresentation, Gender Politics, and Truth in the Case of Mumia Abu-Jamal

January 26, 2014
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Silencing the Record: Misrepresentation, Gender Politics, and Truth in the Case of Mumia Abu-Jamal

By Johanna Fernandez In the last week, conservative media outlets zealously revisited the case of celebrated political prisoner and radio journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal. This time he was attacked in connection with President Barack Obama’s nomination of Debo Adegbile to head the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. That Adegbile is also a trustee of Connecticut College–one of the sponsors of The Feminist Wire–may also be a...
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Confined Writers and Their Criminal Writings

January 26, 2014
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Confined Writers and Their Criminal Writings

By Emahunn Raheem Ali Campbell Last month, The New York Times reported a discovery made in Rochester, New York about what we now know as the first prison memoir written by an African American. Written in 1858 by Robert (Austin) Reed, “he 304-page memoir titled ‘The Life and Adventures of a Haunted Convict, or the Inmate of a Gloomy Prison,’ describes the experiences of the author…from the 1830s to...
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K.O.S. (Determination): Black Communities Keeping It Real and Right

January 26, 2014
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K.O.S. (Determination): Black Communities Keeping It Real and Right

By Liz Derias “…among those that have least, beat hearts of hope, fly sparks of overcoming.” ~ Mumia Abu Jamal, Death Blossoms: Reflections from a Prisoner of Conscience Like many other cities across the US in the 1980’s muddling through the residue of Carter’s liberalism and the immorality of Reganomics, Philadelphia, PA was a hotbed of violence and crime, was riddled with the emergence of crack cocaine, faced ravishing...
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Re-imagining Black Power

January 26, 2014
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Re-imagining Black Power

By Nyle Fort If Black Power were a play who would be its main characters? What would be its major themes? And what scenes would develop its drama? For most of my life when I thought of Black Power a flood of images came to mind: Stokley, Huey, George Jackson, Amiri Baraka, Attica, Watts, and pretty much all things “black,” “radical,” and, of course, male. Besides Assata Shakur and Angela...
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Mumia is a Yogi

January 25, 2014
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By Jamila K. Wilson Breathe…Breathe.  Deep breaths.  Allow your inhale to expand your belly, and intentionally press your bellybutton back into your body.  Use this breath to center yourself in this moment.  You are where you are supposed to be.  The external environment might feel harsh and oppressive; but let this breath ground you in the knowledge that you are free and content. You are not your body.  You are...
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Mumia Abu-Jamal and My Survival

January 25, 2014
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LiveFrom

By Gabriel Teodros A distant father figure who I’ve never once met. A living hero who’s words written from a prison cell had a deeper effect and helped raise me more than most teachers I’ve ever had. Mumia let me know with every offering that I wasn’t alone, and he did it from a place of isolation that I can’t even fathom. I hear his voice via collect phone calls...
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Remember

January 25, 2014
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mumiablacktshirt

By Micol Seigel In the winter of 2001-2002, the dust of the Twin Towers continued to settle, it seemed to me, along with the snow.  I spent that year teaching eager young minds in an elite liberal arts college in Maine.  From a chilly office in the gothic stone building of the History department, I mourned, filed my dissertation, and hoped for an academic career.  Many nights I spent...
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My North Star: How Mumia Abu-Jamal Led Me To Activism

January 24, 2014
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Imarisha-My North Star 2

By Walidah Imarisha In high school in a small town in Oregon, I found guidance in the most unlikely of places. Mrs. Borrevick wore bright lipstick drawn around her actual lips. To make her mouth appear bigger. She didn’t have to do the same with her heart. She was the guidance counselor, took in the misfits and rejects. Mrs. Borrevick became my AP History Independent Study teacher after I...
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From Mumia to Rasmea: Political incarceration in the belly of the beast- from Black Liberation to Arab Freedom

January 24, 2014
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Feghali-Mumia to Rasmea

By Layli Kristy Feghali Coming of age as a young US-born Arab woman in the post 9/11 era, Mumia’s case drew clear attention to the connective threads of imperial oppression that threatened my own people and homelands within a larger system of oppression operating globally.  From Mumia and Assata Shakur to Leonard Peltier and the recent case of Rasmea Yousef Odeh, I have seen how political detainment and torture...
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Assata Shakur is Welcome Here: Bringing Political Prisoners Back Into the Fold

January 24, 2014
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Wondwosen-Assata

By Meron Wondwosen Every generation honors its live conformists and its dead trouble makers—Mignon McLaughlin It was November 5th 2005 and my first cousin was charged with treason by the Ethiopian government—a crime punishable by death or life imprisonment. Daniel and I share the same family features—same forehead. We have the same large eyes. We are in the same profession—the law. And much to our chagrin, because it’s painful...
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*Pretty Sparkly Things: A Black Girl’s Encounter with the Prison Industrial Complex

January 23, 2014
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Ford-Pretty Sparkly Things

I love clothes. I always have. As a black girl coming of age in the early 1990s, I was up on all the adornment trends: from asymmetrical haircuts and Cross Colours jeans to neckties and button down shirts (a la Boyz II Men). As any person who went to a predominantly black school knows, you had to come to school CLEAN! Even as twelve-year-old kids, style was our form...
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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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