Am I A Race Traitor? Trayvon Martin, Gender Talk, and Invisible Black Women

July 21, 2013
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By j.n. salters “Because of the continuous battle against racial erasure that black women and black men share, some black women still refuse to recognize that we are also oppressed as women, and that sexual hostility against black women is practiced not only by the white racist society, but implemented within our black communities as well. It is a disease striking the heart of black nationhood, and silence will not make it disappear.” –Audre Lorde in...
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Instant Messages: On White Womanhood, Fear of Black Men, and Changing Our Minds

July 21, 2013
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By Abe Louise Young because  because because as far as I can tell less than a thousand children playing in the garden of a thousand flowers means the broken neck of birds –June Jordan A person I went to school with instant messages me with frustrated comments about the grief people are airing about the murder of Trayvon Martin and all that’s spiraled forth from it. She thinks it’s...
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The Burdens of Blackness

July 21, 2013
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The Burdens of Blackness

“It’s not hard being black, it’s just time-consuming is all.” I recall a schoolmate in undergrad once saying to me, in an attempt to empathize about the difficult struggles of African Americans, that she imagined that it is quite hard being black. I had been describing to her my experiences of alienation while I was studying under a Dartmouth language program in Barcelona, Spain. At age 18, I did...
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Race Baiting? Our System Has Failed

July 20, 2013
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By Alice Hunt Dear white friends—particularly my white, female friends—our system has failed us. This failure became ever more clear to me when I saw the post of a Facebook friend. “Mary Beth” is someone from my hometown—Boaz, Alabama. She is someone I went to high school with at Boaz High School, the home of the Boaz Pirates, someone I attended Sunday School with at First Baptist Church of...
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Carrying Trayvon’s Body: What is to be done?

July 19, 2013
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By Shana Redmond  To live in this world as Black people is to be confronted by the possibility of harm at every turn, to live with and manage perpetual anger, frustration, and disillusion. As intersectional peoples, we, along with aligned people of color, women, the working-class, immigrant populations, LGBTQI communities, and differently-abled persons recognize that the stability, health, and vitality of U.S. citizenship is premised on our mass exclusion....
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White Feminists and Trayvon Martin

July 19, 2013
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White Feminists and Trayvon Martin

By Debra Guckenheimer Gender and racial inequality are intertwined in ways the Trayvon Martin case highlighted.  Historically, the safety of White women has been used to justify violence against Black men. We must not tolerate it.  Justice for Trayvon Martin is a feminist struggle, and White feminists like me must show up in the fight against the murder of young Black men. Since the end of legal slavery in...
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To Sustain and Nourish Us as We Work for Justice

July 19, 2013
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To Sustain and Nourish Us as We Work for Justice

By Chris Crass To the mother who shared the story of her heart breaking when her six-year old autistic son told her, “don’t worry mom, they won’t kill me, I’m white,” To the mothers, fathers and babas who have thanked me for speaking out as a white person, because they are so afraid that their Black sons could be next, To the mother of a family of biological and...
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Racial Cowardice, White Denial: Post Racial Delusions in the Era of Zimmerman

July 18, 2013
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Racial Cowardice, White Denial: Post Racial Delusions in the Era of Zimmerman

The killing of Trayvon Martin, the trial of George Zimmerman, and the aftermath illustrate how much race matters. Yet the response from many, particularly white America, has been to deny, dismiss, and blame.  And Zimmerman apologists and those privileged by their own post-racial fantasies have been particularly busy.  Take Juror B37 for example, who concludes that, “race did not play a role” in the Zimmerman trial or verdict.  Jonathan Tobin...
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Trayvon and George: Why This Case is Really about Women

July 18, 2013
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By Kelly Macías Like many other Americans, over the last three weeks I was firmly gripped by the George Zimmerman trial. I watched with anxiety and anticipation; waiting for our legal system to embody justice and sentence George Zimmerman to jail for ending Trayvon Martin’s life. Deep in my heart, I feared that justice would not be done. From my social science background, I knew that white juries tend...
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Trayvon's Class of 2013

July 18, 2013
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Trayvon's Class of 2013

Last weekend, at Black Skeptics Los Angeles’ scholarship ceremony, my colleagues and I had the profound honor of giving scholarships to five brilliant youth of color who are first generation college students.  They are seventeen and eighteen year-olds who have known more struggle and sacrifice than many adults have known in their entire lives.  They have each battled the dominant culture’s view that they are not white, male, straight, wealthy, or...
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A Statement on the Reclamation of All Black Life: For Trayvon, Marissa, & Jordan

July 18, 2013
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By Brothers Writing to Live  We begin this collective statement by proclaiming a truth that has been rehearsed on countless occasions by many before us: The lives, the bodies, the souls, and the minds of Black people matter. And even though the spirit of these United States, since its inception, has been animated by a White supremacist desire for Black death, Black people have long resisted—by way of insurgencies, by way...
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