*Pretty Sparkly Things: A Black Girl’s Encounter with the Prison Industrial Complex

January 23, 2014
By
Ford-Pretty Sparkly Things

I love clothes. I always have. As a black girl coming of age in the early 1990s, I was up on all the adornment trends: from asymmetrical haircuts and Cross Colours jeans to neckties and button down shirts (a la Boyz II Men). As any person who went to a predominantly black school knows, you had to come to school CLEAN! Even as twelve-year-old kids, style was our form...
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Mumia: Vulnerability and Hope

January 23, 2014
By
Millward-Mumia

By Jessica Millward     I began writing to Mumia Abu-Jamal in December 2011 while he was in the liminal space between Death Row at SCI Greene and his release into the general population at Mahanoy Prison.  During the seven weeks that he was in “the hole,” we communicated in a series of hand-written notes back and forth. I am not part of the “Campaign to Bring Mumia Home.”...
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Sunny Days?: Sesame Street, Prisons and the Politics of Justice

January 23, 2014
By
sesame20n-2-web

With Nelson Mandela’s funeral on the television, Sammy, who is 6, turned to me with a question that quickly grabbed my attention.  Having already discussed his death, his activism, and apartheid, Sammy was very aware of Madiba’s struggles for justice.  Listening to the commentators praise Mandela for his courage and beautiful spirit, he asked, “if he was so good, why would they put him in jail.” Inundated with messages...
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Ona Move!: A Conversation With Pam Africa and Ramona Africa

January 22, 2014
By
Wilson-Interview w_ Pam & Ramona

By Jamila K. Wilson   As an activist in Philadelphia, I have been mentored by Pam and Ramona Africa of the MOVE family. They are two women whose love of truth supersedes their acceptance of the status quo.  Over the years, I have heard them speak about their lives as members of MOVE. The MOVE family is a radical black liberation group started by John Africa in 1972. MOVE...
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Long Distance Revolutionary: An Intergenerational Conversation

January 22, 2014
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Long Distance Revolutionary: An Intergenerational Conversation

By Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Clyde Gumbs and Jared Gumbs This summer I attended a screening of Prison Radio’s film about Mumia Abu-Jamal, Long Distance Revolutionary.  Mumia Abu-Jamal has been in prison for my entire lifetime, and I have learned on many occasions about his unjust incarceration, his participation in the Black Panther Party and his continued radio activism.  You can usually see a “Free Mumia” pin or t-shirt somewhere at...
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The Making of Mumia: Long Distance Revolutionary

January 22, 2014
By
The Making of Mumia: Long Distance Revolutionary

By Noelle Hanrahan Mumia: Long Distance Revolutionary is an inspiring portrait of a man whom many consider America’s most famous political prisoner – a man whose existence tests our beliefs about freedom of expression. Through prison interviews, archival footage, and dramatic readings, and aided by a potent chorus of voices including Cornel West, Alice Walker, Angela Davis and others, this riveting film explores Mumia’s life before, during and after Death...
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10 Facts about the Mumia Abu-Jamal Case

January 21, 2014
By
Fernandez-10 Facts

By Johanna Fernandez  1. Mumia Abu-Jamal is innocent. Mumia has been wrongfully imprisoned for 32 years. He spent the first 28.5 years of his imprisonment on Pennsylvania’s death row. In 2011, his death sentence was confirmed unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court and he is now serving a sentence of “life in prison” without parole. He is charged with the 1981 murder, in Philadelphia, of police officer Daniel Faulkner. 2. How does...
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How I Use Pinterest To Explore the Difficulties of Violence Against Black Women and Girls

January 21, 2014
By
Donaldson-Pinterest

By Sonya Donaldson When I first used Pinterest, it was with the same intent and fervor of many of those who create boards that feature fashion, food, and other amusements. But a news story that emerged in 2010 forced me to rethink Pinterest for teaching and research in 2011. As news emerged that Lonnie David Franklin (dubbed the “Grim Sleeper”) had been caught, I thought back to the first time...
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How Anti-violence Activism Taught Me to Become a Prison Abolitionist

January 21, 2014
By
Richie-Anti-Violence activism

By Beth E. Richie Sometimes we learn our most profound political lessons in the contours of our everyday activism.  This is certainly the case for me as I recount my journey as a Black feminist activist working to end gender violence for the past 20 years, during which the United States was engaged in building itself up as the world’s leading prison nation. My journey began in Harlem, the renowned...
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“Fire in the Skies”: Introduction to the Mumia and Mass Incarceration Forum

January 20, 2014
By
Ford-Mumia Intro

On December 9, 1981, journalist and activist Mumia Abu-Jamal was arrested and later charged and convicted for murdering Philadelphia police officer Daniel Faulkner. The prosecution’s evidence was weak and pointed to the framing of an innocent man. In the weeks and days before Mumia’s scheduled date of execution (August 17, 1995), millions of people around the world took to the streets in protest. Their collective chant “if Mumia dies,...
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Alternatives to the Present System of Capitalist Injustice

January 20, 2014
By
Angela and Abu Jamal

By Mumia Abu-Jamal and Angela Y. Davis   The Feminist Wire offers an exclusive look at this new essay to be published in the forthcoming volume Imagine: Living in a Socialist USA, edited by Frances Goldin, Michael Smith, and Debby Smith. Read it here before it hits the shelves! We live in an era of mega-incarceration on a scale that can scarcely be imagined. The United States locks up...
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Arts & Culture

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

  • I’ve Got Something To Say About This: A Survival Incantation Kate Rushin
credit/copyright: Rachel Eliza Griffiths

    Kate Rushin: I see the whole thing played out. I’m bludgeoned, bloody, raped. My story is reduced to filler buried in the back of the paper, on page 49, and I say, “No. No way.”

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