The White Family: A Case for National Action

June 16, 2014
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The White Family: A Case for National Action

In the recent swirl of epic violence, mayhem and gun-besotted hysteria that has become the lifeblood of corporate media, no one is asking about the problem of white families. In 1965, then Assistant Secretary of Labor Daniel Patrick Moynihan published a landmark study on the “problem” of the black family. It was the year of the Watts Rebellion and the passage of the Voting Rights Act, two events that...
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4 poems by Andrea Rexilius

June 11, 2014
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andrea

from New Organism: Essais   I want to think like a magi; as stones underwater reflect grief. How images capture tone, and temperature of what is glimpsed. To glimpse why the root is made desperate by inability of its capture. Why, for instance, the word “woman” holds its own intention. One day on the street I found a fissure. I thought it was my sex. I thought it looked...
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It’s Bigger Than Jamal Bryant…

June 6, 2014
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It’s Bigger Than Jamal Bryant…

We interrupt our summer break to bring you this article, in light of recent events within black religion and black popular culture. This is not breaking news. However, in view of the interview that I did on Huff Post Live yesterday, I thought an expansion of context was immediately necessary. Recently, in a sermon to his predominantly black congregation, pastor Jamal H. Bryant appropriated troubled singer Chris Brown’s song, Loyal. To be sure,...
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3 poems by Ari Belathar

June 4, 2014
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Photo-Belathar

  Sleepless song   If you had seen the sea flooded with flowers and my words in your hands in my hands the air burning between two drops of dew you would understand the rumour of abandonment that grows within me                 language of a dead child               scars and kisses   each word that I pronounce is a long fast a country of terrestrial fish a tree...
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The Feminist Wire’s 1st Annual Poetry Contest

June 2, 2014
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The Feminist Wire’s 1st Annual Poetry Contest

Submissions are now open for The Feminist Wire’s 1st Annual Poetry Contest, judged by Evie Shockley. The winner will receive publication in The Feminist Wire and $200. The 1st runner up will receive publication in The Feminist Wire and $100. All submissions will be judged anonymously and considered for future publication in TFW. Additionally, we are excited to announce that Kore Press will publish the winning poem or poems in the form...
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200 Black Men Ask POTUS: What About Our Sisters?

May 30, 2014
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Credit: Official White House Photo from Whitehouse.gov)

Today, the White House released a report that was spearheaded by an interagency task force organized to advise President Obama on the My Brother’s Keeper (MBK) policy initiative. Announcing the Initiative in February, Mr. Obama expressed hope that, “By focusing on the critical challenges, risk factors, and opportunities for boys and young men of color at key life stages, we can improve their long-term outcomes and ability to contribute to the...
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Feminists We Love: Fadzai Muparutsa

May 30, 2014
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Fadzai Muparutsa

May 25th was African Liberation Day (ALD).  The Feminist Wire is celebrating ALD with two interviews of African Feminists We Love: Fadzai Muparutsa, a Zimbabwean queer feminist activist and Amina Doherty, a Nigerian feminist ARTivist, whose interview was published on May 25, 2014.  “We rise up and come together as Africans globally, working for a continent where self-determination, as well as physical, emotional, social and economic wellbeing are guaranteed to...
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Kara Walker and the Sweet Taste of Gentrification

May 30, 2014
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New York City is always changing.  New York neighborhoods, too.  It is not a new story: an underserved neighborhood draws (with inexpensive rent) artists, young people, strivers.  This migration drives a rich arts scene. And, art sells. Many of these NYC neighborhoods were vibrant communities for people of color before the (mostly white) artists arrived.  But with the white folks comes perceived (white) safety.  Then comes the real money, the...
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COLLEGE FEMINISMS: Poetry By Jaclyn Weber

May 30, 2014
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Weber, bio photo

  The Walking Dead   Girl in my history class totally started looking like a zombie from The Walking Dead.                 Maybe I’m watching too much Walking Dead…   She’s shake, shake, shaking those rotten corpse legs in off-brand Ugg’s in ripped up faded jeans blue. In twenty five degree weather, but I guess zombies don’t care about Peoria snow. Guess you...
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Dancing While Black

May 30, 2014
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My friend read the letters DWB on my computer screen, assumed they were the acronym for “driving while black” and wondered what racial profiling had to do with the corresponding photos of black women caught in mid-motion, arms extended, faces to the sky. I told her that DWB is Paloma McGregor’s latest initiative and creative brain (and body) child: Dancing While Black. Paloma, formerly a dancer with Urban Bush...
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Dismantle: Let Me Break It Down

May 29, 2014
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Dismantle: Let Me Break It Down

A Review of Dismantle: An Anthology of Writing from the VONA/Voices Writing Workshop ed. Marissa Johnson-Valenzuela (Philadelphia: Thread Makes Blanket Press 2014) The first anthology of creative writing by students and faculty of the Voices of Our Nation Arts Foundation is called Dismantle.   Following in the tradition of the Cave Canem poetry foundation and the Kundiman collective, a set of voices of writers of color who have shared workshop space, if not...
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