Introducing: Squeezed Between Feminisms (But Not Benedict Cumberbatch)

October 7, 2013
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Introducing: Squeezed Between Feminisms (But Not Benedict Cumberbatch)

By Andrea Plaid and Tami Winfrey Harris; crossposted at Squeezed Between Feminisms Tami: You had to work Benedict Cumberbatch in here, didn’t you? I’m beginning to think you’re secretly a bigger fan than I am! I’m no stranger to Andrea shenanigans. We’ve known each other, what, five or six years? Andrea: Sis, I know Cumberbatch is your catnip, so I knew I could get you here. As far as...
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Forum on Brown Feminism(s)

October 3, 2013
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Forum on Brown Feminism(s)

By Nicole Guidotti-Hernandez, Shubhra Sharma, and Sophia Villarreal-Licona DEADLINE EXTENDED TO JANUARY 1, 2014 At times, it feels like conversations about race in the U.S. are often expressed exclusively in a Black and white dichotomy. This forum intends to cultivate discussions that reveal experiences invisibilized by such a limited understanding of what it means to be a woman of color (WOC) today. With this call for submissions, we hope...
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#BlameFeminism: For the Hurt & the Hustle

October 3, 2013
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#BlameFeminism: For the Hurt & the Hustle

By Tanwi Nandini Islam Feminism is the hustle to survive in a world that does not care about you. The latest Internet satire tells us to #blamefeminism for everything from dying houseplants to paper cuts to breaking down the nuclear family to trigger warnings. As an avowed feminist, and a tad millennial, I’ll join the bandwagon. I #blamefeminism too. As most feminists, I have taken on an unspoken oath to...
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Justice for Marissa! Set her Free! (Read and Sign)

October 2, 2013
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Justice for Marissa!  Set her Free! (Read and Sign)

By Zillah Eisenstein October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.  Marissa Alexander was imprisoned in 2010 for 20 years after trying to defend herself from a known abusive estranged husband.  She shot at him after a life threatening beating from a battering spouse with a history of abuse.  She along with almost 85% of women in prison have been incarcerated because of the “criminalization of survivors of domestic and sexual...
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Sites of Violence: Why Our Notions of “Sex Positive” Feminism Are in Need of an Overhaul

October 1, 2013
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sex positive feminism

  While skimming through news a few weeks ago, I noticed that one of the current hot topics on feminist threads was the Cliteracy project, an installation piece by New York artist Sophia Wallace that focuses on themes of women’s sexual gratification. Like many popular presentations of feminism today, the Cliteracy project seems to propagate the idea that sexual empowerment in the 21st century means that women should enjoy getting off...
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Miss America is Indian-American: Yay, I think. Or not.

September 30, 2013
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Miss America is Indian-American

By Archana A. Pathak Two weeks ago, an Indian-American woman won Miss America, and the ensuing days elicited varying commentaries on this “historic moment.”  It all started with the comments out in the twitterverse: How the fuck does a foreigner win miss America? She is a Arab! #idiots Asian or indian are you kiddin this is america omg Congratulations Al-Qaeda. Our Miss America is one of you. Miss America? You...
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Op-Ed: On Agricultural Goddesses, Women, and Genetically Modified Seeds

September 29, 2013
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Op-Ed: On Agricultural Goddesses, Women, and Genetically Modified Seeds

By Eleni Panagiotarakou On December 11, 1970 the father of the green revolution, Norman Borlaug, during his acceptance speech for the Nobel Peace Prize claimed that “with the help of our Gods and our science, we must not only increase our food supplies but also insure them against biological and physical catastrophes.” Had Borlaug been alive, he would have approved of the decision by the World Food Prize (founded...
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it’s like this: an interview with Doris Davenport

September 26, 2013
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it’s like this: an interview with Doris Davenport

Doris Davenport’s crucial journey as an artist and thinker has spanned many years and has touched the nation (you may for example remember her piece “The Pathology of Racism: A Conversation with Third World Wimmin,” which was included in the groundbreaking anthology This Bridge Called My Back), but her work has also been grounded in the South. In recent years she has been working, writing, and teaching in Georgia and Alabama....
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“Calling All Stars”: Janelle Monae’s Black Feminist Futures

September 25, 2013
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Lordi-1

By Emily J. Lordi I will let others explain why The Electric Lady, released earlier this month, is Janelle Monae’s most beautiful, expertly pop and unapologetically black album yet. Others will want to decode the lyrics and discuss the newest chapter in the Metropolis saga. I want to talk about the brilliant way Monae has thrown down the Afrofuturist gauntlet. At a moment when the term Afrofuturism can seem...
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What Ralph Ellison Can Teach Us about Trayvon Martin

September 24, 2013
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What Ralph Ellison Can Teach Us about Trayvon Martin

By Dennis Tyler Jr. In light of the recent decision by the school board of education in Randolph County, North Carolina, to ban Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man from their libraries—partly because of a parent’s complaint that the book is not age-appropriate material for teenagers and partly because one board member claimed he could not “find any literary value” in the text—I cannot help but reflect on a few of...
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An Open Letter to Same Gender Loving Black Men

September 23, 2013
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warner

By David J. Malebranche My heart is heavy.  My soul longs for relief.  Yesterday my dear friend, mentee and little brother, Warner McGee, transitioned after being taken off life support by his mother due to a protracted illness.  The details of exactly which illness robbed him of his future at this point is irrelevant – the painful reality we face is that yet another talented, intelligent brother has left this...
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Arts & Culture

  • Excerpts from In the Away Time by Kristen Nelson kristen

    . January You called me She instead of You. “Where is she going now?” is the first question you ever asked me. You were standing on a porch next to the last She who you broke. I remember looking up at you over my shoulder and smiling. I was going skinny-dipping. […]

  • Poems for Ferguson: Vanessa Huang and Aya de Leon Michael-Brown-Ferguson-Missouri-Shooting-Petition-Racism-america_2014-08-15_17-44-22

    Two poets consider Michael Brown, Ferguson, MO, and the crucial ways in which Black Life Matters.     How Do I Love Thee? A love poem from the Ferguson, MO police dept to Black residents: An informal emulation of Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Sonnet 43 by Aya de Leon . How […]

  • “Paws” by Tracy Burkholder tracy

    Paws   In sixth grade, I started to envy certain girls’ hands. Not always manicured, but always neat. Fingers thin and smooth. These hands gently freed sheets of paper from their metal spirals and lifted loops of hair to more beautiful perches. Lunch trays floated inside their gentle grip while […]