Second (and Third, and Fourth…) Helpings: A Big Black Woman’s Thoughts on "The Help"

August 19, 2011
By
Second (and Third, and Fourth…) Helpings: A Big Black Woman’s Thoughts on "The Help"

By Mecca Jamilah Sullivan Until more recently than I’d like to admit, I constructed my identity in direct opposition to the image of the Mammy. As a big black girl who loved to smile, I insisted on playing the father, the neighbor, the gardener—anything but the mother—in games of house. When bandanas were fly in high school, I made sure to rock mine in outlandish neon greens, underscored by...
Read more »

Featured Artist: J'Nell Jordan, Painter

August 17, 2011
By
Featured Artist:  J'Nell Jordan, Painter

She Just Wanna Dance Oil and acrylic on masonite board Dimensions: 24″ x 36″ Sky High Daze Oil and acrylic on masonite board Dimensions: 24″ x 24″  Green Medium: Oil and Acrylic on masonite board Dimensions: 16” x 20” J’Nell Jordan was born in 1987 and was in raised Northern Virginia. She attended Adelphi University in New York on a visual arts talent scholarship and received her Bachelor of...
Read more »

Beyond The Sacrificial Good Woman: Black Feminism and Freethought

August 15, 2011
By
Beyond The Sacrificial Good Woman: Black Feminism and Freethought

By Sikivu Hutchinson In the 1997 film The Apostle, Robert Duvall plays a white Southern Christian fundamentalist preacher and murderer on the lam and seeking redemption.  The film is literally cluttered with images of devout blacks—from black women swaying in the breeze at a big tent church revival to a particularly indelible church scene of dozens of black men chanting “Jesus” in rapturous response to Duvall’s pulpit-pounding call.  I...
Read more »

Kathryn Stockett Is Not My Sister and I Am Not Her Help

August 12, 2011
By
Kathryn Stockett Is Not My Sister and I Am Not Her Help

By Duchess Harris, PhD, JD. I did not attend Wednesday’s movie release of “The Help” from DreamWorks Pictures, based on the New York Times best-selling novel by Kathryn Stockett.  Why, you ask? Because I read the book. Last week New York Times op-ed columnist Frank Bruni saw an advance screening of the movie and referred to it as  “…a story of female grit and solidarity — of strength through...
Read more »

A View from London

August 10, 2011
By
A View from London

At the time of writing, the protests that began two nights ago in the North London neighborhood of Tottenham have developed into full-blown riots in other neighborhoods across the city, including Enfield, Hackney, Brixton, Lewisham, Ealing, Clapham, Peckham, Camden, Woolwich, Bromley, Croydon (5 miles from my current location), as well as the cities of Leeds, Liverpool and Birmingham, hundreds of miles away. Police have been employed, civilians attacked, businesses...
Read more »

Resurrecting the Great Mother

August 8, 2011
By
Resurrecting the Great Mother

By Rev. Sheri Heller, LCSW “I found god in myself and I loved her /I loved her fiercely.” - Ntozake Shange We come into this world yearning to connect with the mother. Psychoanalyst Carl Gustav Jung conveyed that this innate need for mothering is archetypal, meaning that it reflects a universal symbolic pattern inherent in both the individual and collective unconscious. This universal need was collectively expressed in ancient matriarchal...
Read more »

Talking Vaginas and Football Heroes: Gender, Race and Advertising

August 5, 2011
By
Talking Vaginas and Football Heroes: Gender, Race and Advertising

Summer’s Eve has pulled its controversial “Hail to the V” ads amidst enormous criticism from feminists, bloggers, YouTube watchers and…well, just about everybody. Thank goodness because there is nothing more disgusting than a talking vagina. Think about it. No one needs to see that.  Except the people at Summer’s Eve who seemed to think talking vaginas were a great marketing ploy. At least Schick Quattro Trim Style commercials use...
Read more »

“Feministing” Bernini: What Italian Art Taught Me

August 3, 2011
By
“Feministing” Bernini: What Italian Art Taught Me

By Keri Day How might art both reflect complex social realities and inspire social realities to be more radically inclusive and complimentary of human flourishing? This quintessential feminist question emerged for me when I took a trip to Rome, Italy, a couple of weeks ago.  Upon my arrival to Rome, I was immediately struck by the stunning and dramatic architecture that is a hallmark of the city’s unique aesthetics. ...
Read more »

A Prophet in Exile: A Personal Meditation on James Baldwin

August 1, 2011
By
A Prophet in Exile: A Personal Meditation on James Baldwin

By Rev. Osagyefo Uhuru Sekou After the re-election of George W. Bush, I was done with America.  Less than a year into Bush’s second term, I left the United Statesfor the first time. At the tender age of 34, I moved to Paris to be like James Baldwin. With money from a writing fellowship, I was confident that I was going to compose ‘the book’; but I was not convinced...
Read more »

Dial M for Murdoch and Mayhem

July 29, 2011
By
Dial M for Murdoch and Mayhem

The pathways into the Murdoch scandal are so numerous that a single writer knows from the outset of any attempt to address it that his or her efforts will be partial, if not futile, at best; with that acknowledgment on the table, I hope to provide here a prolegomenon to TFW’s first forum to come in the next few weeks, when several members of the magazine’s Editorial Collective and...
Read more »

‘Keep Your Sorry’: On Slavery, Marriage and the Possibility of Love

July 27, 2011
By

Recently, the Iowa based organization, The Family Leader, apologized for a controversial reference to slavery in their “Marriage Vow,” a document that it created to obligate Republican presidential candidates that it endorses to conform to its homophobic, anti-choice, conservative agenda. The passage in question says that: “…a child born into slavery in 1860 was more likely to be raised by his mother and father in a two-parent household than...
Read more »

Follow The Feminist Wire

Arts & Culture

  • Poem Suite: Shards Rainbow Shards

    In our Poem Suites, we bring together the voices of emerging and established poets exploring a common theme. In today’s Poem Suite, two poets explore fracturing, fragmentation and “shards” from feminist perspectives. . Making Mosaics By Leah Ware Gluing the pieces together, One by one, the mirrors go down Along […]

  • Poem Suite: Monsters magical-weave-mirror

    In our Poem Suites, we bring together the voices of emerging and established poets exploring a common theme. In today’s Poem Suite, two poets explore images of monsters and monstrosity from feminist perspectives.    Mary Shelley: My Mother’s Monsters By Melissa Knox   By the time I came along she […]

  • Poem Suite: Becoming DSC_0377

    In our Poem Suites, we bring together the voices of emerging and established poets exploring a common theme. In today’s Poem Suite, two poets explore processes of change, motion, and becoming from feminist perspectives.        From “Lesion” By Indrani Sengupta   thereafter   overgrown freckle. overzealous lovemark not […]