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Introducing: Joseph Osmundson

January 8, 2014
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Introducing: Joseph Osmundson

Joseph Osmundson is a scientist, writer, and educator born and raised in the rural Pacific Northwest.  His research focuses on protein structure and function while his writing explores identity and place and sexuality and class and race and all sorts of messy, complicated stuff.  His work has been published on Gawker, and he will have...
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Introducing: Stephanie Troutman

January 8, 2014
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Introducing: Stephanie Troutman

Stephanie Troutman is the daughter of interracial, working class parents. Raised primarily by a single, low-income mother, Stephanie is a Black feminist scholar and first-generation college student. She received a Dual-PhD in Education and Women’s Studies from The Pennsylvania State University in 2011. A former high school and middle grades public school teacher, Stephanie currently...
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TFW: The Year in Review

December 31, 2013
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TFW: The Year in Review

Today is the final day of 2013. And this year has been one that pushed many people around the world to deeply consider and interrogate the various social locations that shape our lives. From the distinct ways that structural violence, micro-aggressive actions, deleterious public policy, negative cultural representations, and “natural” disasters illuminated the vestiges...
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3 poems by Niki Herd

December 25, 2013
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3 poems by Niki Herd

Conjure Season   Last night another woman  died at the hands of a lover  boy  friend husband  ex  take  your pick & all the mouths are silent. Let’s be specific. We’re trying not to be childish trying not to invoke the memory of us girls lined on one side of homeroom boys on the...
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We Exist In Darkness (Living at the Intersections)

November 21, 2013
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We Exist In Darkness (Living at the Intersections)

By: Naomi Ortiz Intersectionality is described by dominant culture as the location where all of our multiple identities intersect. However, my identities are not straight lines, which only intersect in one place. For me, intersectionality is more like living in multiple worlds at once. Intersectionality is like a woven basket. Pieces of me are...
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Posted in Culture, Disability, Ethnicity, LGBTQI, Privilege, Sexism, Stereotypes, Uncategorized, Women of Color, World | 3 Comments »

On Disability and Cartographies of Difference

November 19, 2013
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Gomez picture

By Wilfredo Gomez I recently returned to my alma mater to encounter a rather peculiar and interesting narrative about my legacy. While interacting with former teachers, classmates, and current students, stories were told about the years I spent at the school. One person told a story about how I played varsity basketball during my...
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Posted in Disability, Sports, Uncategorized | 4 Comments »

In Cold Blood: The Murder of Renisha McBride

November 11, 2013
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In Cold Blood: The Murder of Renisha McBride

A white family grieves in outrage after their teenage daughter has been gunned down by a black homeowner in an African American neighborhood. In this parallel universe the killer walks free, enjoying the benefit of being viewed as having defended his home from a violent intruder, while the big city D.A. decides whether or not to charge him....
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Fiction Feature: “In the Manner of Water or Light” by Roxane Gay

November 6, 2013
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Roxane Gay

An excerpt from “In the Manner of Water or Light” By Roxane Gay   My mother was conceived in what would ever after be known as the Massacre River. The sharp smell of blood has followed her since. When she first moved to the United States, she read the dictionary from front to back....
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Ethnicity, Family, Fiction, Uncategorized, Women of Color, Writing | Comments Off

Women Writers of the Diaspora with TFW Collective Member Mecca Jamilah Sullivan

November 5, 2013
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New School Flyer

.. . Join us as TFW editorial collective member Mecca Jamilah Sullivan reads at the New School for Public Engagement, as part of the Women Writers of the Diaspora reading series. . . Thursday, November 7, 2013 at 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm The New School for Public Engagement Dorothy Hirshon Suite (Room I205), Arnhold...
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Posted in TFW in the World, Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

Feminists We Love: Alison Piepmeier

October 25, 2013
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Alison Piepmeier

It’s hard to say exactly what distinguishes good teaching from great teaching, but the evidence of transformative teaching is undeniable. Transformative teachers cultivate student followings. Students linger well after class is over to ask follow up questions and to keep the conversation going. When students go above and beyond the requirements of a class–reading...
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Arts & Culture

  • 3 poems by Amir Rabiyah amir

    Our Dangerous Sweetness “caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare” -Audre Lorde When I hear the news, another one of us has been killed my heart constricts, I clutch at my own heart, I reach with a frantic grief towards [...]

  • 2 poems by Margaree Little molly little

    BLACKBERRY GARDEN As though by going back to it now it would become clear—or more than that, say what you mean, come right, a resolution of the leaves piling up in the yard, then turning to mulch, behind the house the blackberry bushes taking over the length of the garden.  [...]

  • Two Poems by Erin Parks then and now

    By Erin Parks     3 Queens Haiku Strange and strong Women Transcending normal life things Freedom in a word           For Men Who Claim They Love #TeamNatural My hair is not easy to manipulate. It takes time, patience, and skill. Yes, you must know how [...]