Author Archive

Toni Cade Bambara of Simpson Avenue

November 21, 2014
By
Nikky Finney(Rachel Eliza Griffiths photographer)

Nikky Finney: I knew this tradition. Older Black women handing over younger Black women to the next Black woman in line for her Finishing work. It took me several weeks to get up the nerve to call. Next thing I knew, I was walking up the hill to Toni Cade’s Pamoja writing workshop. This...
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Posted in Black Women, Personal is Political., Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 2 Comments »

Toni Cade Bambara’s “Toni-Isms”

November 21, 2014
By
Carole Brown and Toni Cade Bambara circa 1950s
courtesy: Carole Brown

Carole Brown: You have touched thousands of aspiring and seasoned writers, students, and just plain folks worldwide. Your fame has never taken the place of your love for our Black community, because you desired success for everyone you came in contact with—even strangers. Never once did you feel that you should receive disparate treatment...
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Posted in Black Girls, Black Women, Feminism, Personal is Political., Toni Cade Bambara | 3 Comments »

Remembering Toni

November 21, 2014
By
alice lovelace (Nic Paget-Clarke) US Social Forum 2007

Alice Lovelace: Her questions gently guided me to claim my life as a writer. Through the years, Toni asked me many questions that lead to me owning my gifts. Her questions led me to the realization that I was a natural teacher. Her questions forced me to value my writing and to request payment...
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Posted in Activism, Black Women, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 4 Comments »

what is left

November 21, 2014
By
M. Nzadi Keita
photograph: ©Elizabeth Ho

M. Nzadi Keita: what you remember/ starts with a smile/ a raw edge/ a single snip/ from the someone dead
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Love, Poetry, Toni Cade Bambara | Comments Off

In ‘My Solitude’ with Toni Cade Bambara

November 21, 2014
By
Pamela A. Hooks

Pamela Hooks: She opened my world, opened my eyes. I saw the political and poetry in everything now. Together, Toni and Njeri would break down everything with a fine tooth comb—from the politics of government cheese to the best places to find vegetarian food or chicken wings and then stuck the bush comb...
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Posted in Black Women, Family, Toni Cade Bambara | 1 Comment »

Praise to the Writer

November 21, 2014
By
Toni Cade Bambara,
Southern Collective of African American Writers (SCAAW), 1988
©Susan J. Ross

Alice Lovelace: Toni Cade made an art of living/ Toni stood and we were lifted
Toni spoke and our lives were saved/ Toni listened and we were validated/ She is the breast that fed our union/ Hers' was the womb of our nourishment.
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Posted in Arts & Culture, Black Women, Poetry, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 2 Comments »

Toni Cade Bambara’s Art of Bridging Praxis and Theory

November 20, 2014
By
Thabiti Lewis

Thabiti Lewis: Young feminists need to pay more attention to Bambara’s fiction and essays, which reveal a pioneering voice that betrothed answers to the range of issues consuming contemporary feminist struggles. Indeed, Bambara’s art is in the tradition of abolitionist Maria Stewart, who deftly negotiated Christianity, nationalism, and feminism. There is no question that...
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Posted in Academia, Activism, Black Women, Feminism, intersectionality, Patriarchy, Racism, Sexism, Toni Cade Bambara, U.S., World, Writing | 1 Comment »

It’s Not the Salt; it’s the Sugar that Will Kill You

November 20, 2014
By
Kalamu ya Salaam
Photographer/copyright: Alex Lear

Kalamu ya Salaam: This Toni was never going to win major awards, never going to be enshrined in the academy. This Toni would look back on America and turn to salt before she would abandon her people.
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Posted in Academia, Activism, Black Men, Black Women, Feminism, Racism, Sexism, Toni Cade Bambara, Writing | 1 Comment »

Toni’s Powerful Intervention: Artist Tom Feelings Talks with His Son

November 20, 2014
By
Kamili, Zamani, and Tom Feelings
Courtesy of Kamili Feelings

Kamili and Tom Feelings: As members of “progressive” communities, these kinds of interventions can be embarrassing. We flatter ourselves into thinking that “we’re all right” and it’s always the other person who has the problem. But Toni Cade Bambara, once wrote that revolution starts “with the self in the self.”
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Posted in Black Men, Black Women, Culture, Racism, White Supremacy, Whiteness, Writing | 1 Comment »

Listen You Can Hear the Mothers Crying in the Universe: A Black Feminist Poet’s Requiem for Our Black Warrior Toni

November 19, 2014
By
Care Page image

Cara Page: This is a tribute to the Black Feminist Warrior Toni Cade Bambara and her insightful vision to rename place, resiliency and spirit of Black folks after incidences of state violence against our black children and community. Her understanding of place/of spirit/of people outside of state interrogation and interruption was a critical witnessing,...
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Posted in Activism, Black Girls, Black life matters, Black Men, Black Women, Culture, Feminism, Fiction, Film, Patriarchy, Poetry, Racism, Sexism, Toni Cade Bambara, Violence, White Supremacy, Writing | 6 Comments »

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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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