Author Archive

How We’re Failing Black Girls

November 11, 2014
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How We’re Failing Black Girls

“I don’t want to be considered African American,” one of my tenth grade Women’s Leadership Project students said, shaking her intelligent head distastefully.  Another girl agreed, stating that her relatives were from Louisiana, so what did that have to do with Africa?  We’d been watching the 2008 film “The Souls of Black Girls.”  Our...
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Posted in Black Girls, Black Women, Feminism, media, Sexism, Stereotypes, White Supremacy, Youth | 1 Comment »

Where are the White Feminists? MIA on Racist Misogynist Police Violence

September 16, 2014
By
Where are the White Feminists? MIA on Racist Misogynist Police Violence

The Oklahoma NAACP recently called on the Department of Justice to investigate accused rapist and Oklahoma City Police officer Daniel Holtzclaw for federal hate crime violations against his black women victims.  On September 5th, Holtzclaw was released on bail after being charged with sixteen counts of rape, sexual assault, stalking and sodomy.  Judge Tim...
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Posted in Black life matters, Black Women, Criminal Justice, Feminism, Sexism, sexual violence, White Privilege, White Women | 3 Comments »

Burying Our Babies: Letter from Los Angeles to Ferguson

August 25, 2014
By
NMOS in Leimert Park, South L.A.

In South Los Angeles’s Crenshaw District, there are three funeral homes within a one mile radius of each other. On bright sunny days, young people pour out from their doors after viewing hours, lingering on the steps reminiscing, sporting t-shirts with pictures and art work commemorating the dead. On a thoroughfare that epitomizes L.A.’s...
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Posted in Black Women, Criminal Justice, Education, Militarization, Racism, Uncategorized, White Privilege, Youth | 2 Comments »

Getting on Up: The Cult of the Charismatic Black Man

August 6, 2014
By
jill scott

Charismatic black men slapping black women around are funny.  This was the takeaway conveyed by some audience members at a screening I attended of the new James Brown biopic Get On Up at a predominantly black theater in Los Angeles. Largely sidestepping the chronic abuse Brown inflicted on multiple spouses (Brown served jail time...
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Posted in Black Girls, Black Women, Feminism, masculinity, Religion, Sexism, Uncategorized, Violence | 6 Comments »

The White Family: A Case for National Action

June 16, 2014
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The White Family: A Case for National Action

In the recent swirl of epic violence, mayhem and gun-besotted hysteria that has become the lifeblood of corporate media, no one is asking about the problem of white families. In 1965, then Assistant Secretary of Labor Daniel Patrick Moynihan published a landmark study on the “problem” of the black family. It was the year...
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Posted in Economy, Family, Patriarchy, Racism, Violence, White Privilege, Youth | 7 Comments »

The Sterling Shuffle: Unpacking White Jewish Racism

April 30, 2014
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The Sterling Shuffle: Unpacking White Jewish Racism

Every Sunday for the past several years the mug of real estate mogul/slumlord and L.A. Clippers owner Donald Sterling has commanded prime ad space in the Los Angeles Times.  Touting Sterling’s philanthropy, these ads often feature grinning photos of prominent African American politicians, religious leaders and other glad-handing public figures who’ve received hefty donations...
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Feminists We Love: In Praise of Black Women Teachers

February 14, 2014
By
Black Math teacher & student

Editors Note: Instead of focusing on one or two specific Feminists We Love, this Valentines Day we highlight a photo-documentary project that uplifts progressive African-American teachers who are “on the frontlines of feminist change.” A Photo-documentary project Even though they might not label themselves as such, progressive African American women teachers are often on...
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Posted in Black Women, Feminism, Feminists We Love, Racism, Sexism | 3 Comments »

In Cold Blood: The Murder of Renisha McBride

November 11, 2013
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In Cold Blood: The Murder of Renisha McBride

A white family grieves in outrage after their teenage daughter has been gunned down by a black homeowner in an African American neighborhood. In this parallel universe the killer walks free, enjoying the benefit of being viewed as having defended his home from a violent intruder, while the big city D.A. decides whether or not to charge him....
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Posted in Uncategorized | 7 Comments »

Feminists We Love: Thandisizwe Chimurenga

November 1, 2013
By
Thandisizwe Chimurenga

Thandisizwe Chimurenga is an award-winning, freelance journalist based in Los Angeles.  She came to journalism through activism, understanding how powerful media can be for destroying or building grassroots, revolutionary change. She has been a writer and creator or co-creator of media (newspapers, Cable TV, radio) for over 20 years (most notably as co-creator of...
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Posted in Feminists We Love | 1 Comment »

Secular Woman of the Year

October 25, 2013
By
Secular Woman of the Year

I’m honored to be recognized as the Secular Woman of the Year by Secular Woman, a feminist gender justice organization dedicated to “amplifying the voice, presence, and influence of non-religious women.” Writer Ian Cromwell was named “Secular Man of the Year” and writer Soraya Chemaly was named “Secular Activist of the Year”  for her feminist advocacy. Writing about the...
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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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