Author Archive

Feminists We Love: Toshi Reagon [VIDEO]

September 12, 2014
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Reagon-Toshi-cr-Bernie-DeChant-1

In today’s Feminists We Love feature,  writer, performer and arts activist Toshi Reagon talks with TFW Associate Editor Mecca Jamilah Sullivan about feminist lineages, the politics of creative work,  and the role of the artist in feminist thought and movement-building. Toshi Reagon is a multi-talented singer, composer, musician, curator and producer with...
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Posted in Activism, Culture, Entertainment, Feminism, Feminists We Love, intersectionality, LGBTQI, Love, Poetry, Politics, Uncategorized, Women of Color, Writing | 2 Comments »

How to be Black in the Age of Obama, George Zimmerman, and Paula Deen: Notes from Summer, 2013

July 30, 2013
By
Racism_by_Eibo_Jeddah

  Welcome to the impossible future. White people are talking about race. Sometimes, they’ll even talk about racism. Some will say the word “racism” hesitantly, tentatively, as though it’s the name of an exotic food they’re not sure how to pronounce and are even less sure they’d like to taste. But they’ll say it....
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Posted in Activism, Black Women, Feminism, Fiction, History, LGBTQI, Op-Ed, Poetry, Sexuality, U.S., Women of Color, World, Writing | 9 Comments »

On The Morning of the Election (Or, "Your Abstention Will Not Protect You: Voting and Radical Black Feminist Politics")

November 6, 2012
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On The Morning of the Election (Or, "Your Abstention Will Not Protect You: Voting and Radical Black Feminist Politics")

By C. Riley Snorton and Mecca Jamilah Sullivan Today marks the conclusion of the voting period, which will settle numerous electoral decisions, including various seats in the Congress, local and state referenda, and most notably, the Presidential seat. Yesterday, we read a number of eloquent arguments about why some people are choosing to abstain...
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Posted in Academia, Black Women, Politics, U.S., World | 28 Comments »

Central Park Saturday

June 17, 2012
By
Central Park Saturday

Until I was about six years old, my father and I had a ritual of spending Saturday mornings in Central Park together. My mother was a doctoral student, and so our time out of the house gave her a chance to get her dissertation done. He called the outings our “adventures”— we’d take the...
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Diaspora (for a friend)

June 6, 2012
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  You inspire me in too many directions. I am laughing onto pillows, gurgling spit into screen.   Visions mangled between eyes, quicktongued foreign gazes, choked translations, fingers trying to scratch past exile rage, do the work of diaspora.   But you insist you feel drawn to this, find kinship and connection, bloodmemories that...
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From "A Magic of Bags"

May 13, 2012
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From "A Magic of Bags"

It was not that Ilana Randolph did not like people. She did. What she didn’t like was the way they looked at her, and at each other, either locked in magnetic gazes that were supposed to hold forever, or from an ocean’s width of distance. By seventeen, Ilana had made a study of watching...
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Posted in Family, U.S., Youth | Comments Off

Snow Fight

March 21, 2012
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Snow Fight

“Snow Fight” is a story about the complex relationships between joy, power and objectification in the lives of young black people and young people of color. In many ways, I think that this story is pertinent to the moment we’re experiencing right now, particularly in the wake of Trayvon Martin’s murder. In the story, I explore...
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Posted in Culture | 4 Comments »

Black Queer Gender and Pariah’s “Grand Swagger”

January 3, 2012
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Three white women crowd the ticket window. “What is Pariah?” one asks, flustered. The ticket vender stammers. “It’s, uh, kind of a slice-of-life among kids in Brooklyn.” My partner and I exchange a glance. It’s the opening night of Pariah, Dee Rees’s resoundingly-well-received debut film, which opened in select theatres on December 28th. The...
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Posted in Culture, Entertainment | 28 Comments »

Media, Sports and Black Queer Youth: Tayshana Murphy and the Dimming of Stars

November 28, 2011
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Media, Sports and Black Queer Youth: Tayshana Murphy and the Dimming of Stars

I didn’t know Tayshana Murphy was gay. I’m from Harlem, and I like to think I’m tapped into important conversations among New York’s LGBTQ people of color communities. I learned of 18-year-old Murphy’s murder early on September 11th  of this year—heard about it, in fact, from an auntie of mine before I heard it...
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Posted in Sports, U.S. | 4 Comments »

Un-Settling Fatness: Obesity Goes Pop-Genre Big

November 11, 2011
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Un-Settling Fatness: Obesity Goes Pop-Genre Big

I expected to love Chelsea Settles. I expected to hate Chelsea Settles. On both counts, I was wrong. MTV’s newest (semi)reality protagonist— spun, as the network puts it, as “A New Kind of Heroine”—the 23-year-old, 324-lb Pennsylvania native is likeable, but not quite loveable. She is sweet, and pretty, and her dialogue gestures toward...
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Posted in Entertainment | 20 Comments »

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Arts & Culture

  • Remembering and Honoring Toni Cade Bambara Sanchez

    Sonia Sanchez: What are we pretending not to know today? The premise as you said, my sister, being that colored people on planet earth really know everything there is to know. And if one is not coming to grips with the knowledge, it must mean that one is either scared or pretending to be stupid.

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

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