Treva B. Lindsey: The Future and the Now, a Feminist we Love (Video)

April 4, 2014
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Dr. Treva B. Lindsey is very much the future – of black popular cultural studies, feminist scholarship, social media activism, and so much more.  Someone who is pushing conversations about feminism, and black popular culture, who is utilizing social media and public spaces to expand conversations, and someone who prioritizes community, engagement, and collective love, Dr. Lindsey is paving roads to a new future. An assistant professor in Women and Gender Studies at THE Ohio State University, Dr. Lindsey’s work focuses on black feminist thought, women’s historiography, and black popular cultural.  Her work has appeared in The Journal of Pan-African Studies, SOULS, African and Black Diaspora, the Journal of African American Studies, and African American Review. She has also contributed to the Feminist Wire and appeared on Left of Black. Dr. Lindsey’s work is inspiring for its forward thinking, its extension of a larger history of black feminist thought, and its refusal to accept the status quo. More than her work, her online presence, and her commitment to social transformation, Treva embodies how the personal is political.  Her ability to connect to her work, to shine a spotlight on its relevance, and incorporate theorizing and scholarship into her daily praxis is something to admire.  Brilliant and kind, a teacher and social media game changer, an intellectual and a sports fan, Dr. Treva B. Lindsey is an inspiration.  For these reasons and many more she is a scholar, an activist, a commentator, a teacher, and a feminist we love here at TFW.

 

After watching this brilliant interview, please go here to read her brilliance

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One Response to Treva B. Lindsey: The Future and the Now, a Feminist we Love (Video)

  1. […] Dr. Treva B. Lindsey is very much the future – of black popular cultural studies, feminist scholarship, social media activism, and so much more.  Someone who is pushing conversations about feminism, and black popular culture, who is utilizing social media and public spaces to expand conversations, and someone who prioritizes community, engagement, and collective love, Dr. Lindsey is paving roads to a new future. An assistant professor in Women and Gender Studies at THE Ohio State University, Dr. Lindsey’s work focuses on black feminist thought, women’s historiography, and black popular cultural.  Her work has appeared in The Journal of Pan-African Studies, SOULS, African and Black Diaspora, the Journal of African American Studies, and African American Review. She has also contributed to the Feminist Wire and appeared on Left of Black. Dr. Lindsey’s work is inspiring for its forward thinking, its extension of a larger history of black feminist thought, and its refusal to accept the status quo. More than her work, her online presence, and her commitment to social transformation, Treva embodies how the personal is political.  Her ability to connect to her work, to shine a spotlight on its relevance, and incorporate theorizing and scholarship into her daily praxis is something to admire.  Brilliant and kind, a teacher and social media game changer, an intellectual and a sports fan, Dr. Treva B. Lindsey is an inspiration.  For these reasons and many more she is a scholar, an activist, a commentator, a teacher, and a feminist we love here at TFW (To watch more of Treva Lindsey’s brilliance, see her discussion with David Leonard here) […]

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