TFW on The Cultural Impact of Kanye West

February 7, 2014
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The Cultural Impact of Kanye WestThis March, Palgrave MacMillan will publish The Cultural Impact of Kanye West (edited by Julius Bailey), which features “An Examination of the Kanye West Higher Education Trilogy” by Heidi R. Lewis, TFW Associate Editor and Assistant Professor of Feminist & Gender Studies at Colorado College, and “You got Kanyed: Seen But Not Heard” by David J. Leonard, TFW Associate Editor and Associate Professor of Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies at Washington State University.

The Cultural Impact of Kanye West ”offers an in-depth reading of the works and cultural impact of Kanye West. Looking at the moral and social implications of West’s words, images, and music in the broader context of Western civilization’s preconceived ideas, the contributors consider how West both challenges [and propagates] religious and moral norms.” The book also features Mark Anthony NealAkil HoustonJohn JenningsRegina Bradley, and other scholars, activists, and artists.

 

 

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One Response to TFW on The Cultural Impact of Kanye West

  1. Jerome L Freeman on February 7, 2014 at 1:03 pm

    Awesome !

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