Rev. Kyndra Danyelle Frazier on Radical Love

September 5, 2013
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By Rev. Kyndra Danyelle Frazier

Love can radically be re-imagined as an emotive action and response shared by all sentient beings that creates, heightens, and strengthens vulnerability. Being vulnerable is a courageous act that requires honesty and authentic risk-taking to show up as our full selves, with all of our wounds and insecurities [the oppressed and oppressor]. When love’s intent is to incite vulnerability it can create an ethos where persons can be invited to grow and dismantle old beliefs that infringe upon the health of our communities. This has the potential to support persons as they move from behind platforms [racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ageism, ableism etc.] constructed to blind us from the truth that the liberation we as scholars and activists work towards for marginalized populations is for the whole of humanity. This type of loving is tenacious because it requires that we struggle to be in dialogue and/or relationship with persons that may offend our sensibilities. It also will require many to give up privileges they have become accustomed to. This love costs all who endeavor to participate. This way of loving is challenging, yet this is the entry point to social transformation.

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Blogger_KyndraFrazierRev. Kyndra Danyelle Frazier is a native of Charlotte, North Carolina. She is a 2010 graduate of Emory University, Candler School of Theology’s Master of Divinity program. She was ordained at Oakhurst Baptist Church in Decatur, GA, on October 27, 2012. She now resides in Bronx, NY, pursuing a Masters of Science in Social Work at Columbia University. Kyndra is specializing in Advanced Clinical Practice in the health/mental health field and minoring in International Social Welfare. She is a spiritual activist and writer who seeks to integrate spirituality, ritual practice, and clinical therapy to support persons in thriving. Her interests are in family systems theory, cognitive behavioral therapy, spirituality, African traditional religious practices, and LGBT issues. To read more from Rev. Kyndra visit www.kyndandfree.com, her personal blog.

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