Op-Eds at The Feminist Wire

January 27, 2013
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Here at The Feminist Wire, we like to roll with the punches, grow with the times, and reinvent ourselves when necessary and fruitful. This week, we enjoyed an opportunity to publish an op-ed by feminist scholar Lynne Huffer, which appears today. And this got us to thinking…why not dedicate Sundays at TFW to op-eds?

The op-ed is a particular kind of textual animal. In newspapers across the country, the op-ed is typically written by somebody not connected to the newspaper’s editorial team. “Opposite the editorial page”–or op-ed–is meant to designate an opinion/editorial by an outsider, whereas editorials are generally written by folks connected to the newspaper.

So the TFW op-eds will be written by you, not us. And they’ll be posted on Sunday, when our readers are most likely to be curled up with a cup of coffee or tea, with their own local or national newspapers in front of them, ready to read about the news and opinion of the day. We invite you to send us your best “opposite the editorial page” offerings.

And if you don’t know how to write an op-ed, there are resources available. Today’s featured writer, Lynne Huffer, is a Fellow with The Op-Ed Project, whose “mission is to increase the range of voices and quality of ideas we hear in the world. A starting goal is to increase the number of women thought leaders in key commentary forums to a tipping point.” You can also read op-eds in newspapers across the country for guidelines, hints, and writing strategies.

We look forward to your words.  And as always here at TFW, we look forward to your readership, now on Sunday, too.

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