Court Rules Against Bishops in One Birth Control Fight

March 28, 2012
By

Last Friday, a federal judge ruled against Catholic bishops in a battle over whether the group could impose its views on contraception and abortion through its control of taxpayer dollars.

Over the last six months the bishops have argued the Obama administration is anti-Catholic because it refused to renew a contract with the group to provide services to victims of human trafficking. The bishops had been administering almost all of the federal money allocated for such services, which amounted to about $3 million a year. This money was dispensed to contractors around the country at the Bishop’s discretion.

The bishops prohibited the contractors from using the federal funds to pay for staff time to counsel victims on contraception or abortion, or to refer them for such services.

The ACLU sued the US Department of Health and Human Services over the grants, arguing the rules violated constitutional prohibitions on church and state. And while that case was working its way through the court system, the Obama administration decided not to renew the bishops’ contract, mostly because the bishops refused to provide these critical reproductive health services that trafficking victims need.

On Friday a federal judge validated that position, siding with the ACLU on the contract.

Read more: Care2

Comments are closed.

Follow The Feminist Wire

Arts & Culture

  • Hunger Kwame Laughing Foto

    They say you had the eye; they say you saw
    into people. They say you came before as shaman
    or bruja and returned as priestess; they say you were
    stonebreaker. But for me, you were a big sister
    feeling for a lonely brother with no language
    to lament, and you gave me more days, and
    more days. Yes, they could have called you
    Grace, Bambara; they could have called you that.

  • Stroller (A Screenplay) Black families and community

    Roxana Walker-Canton: Natalie sits in her own seat in front of her mother and looks out the window. Mostly WHITE PEOPLE get on and off the bus now. The bus rides through a neighborhood of single family homes. A BLACK WOMAN with TWO WHITE CHILDREN get on the bus. Natalie stares at the children.

  • I’ve Got Something To Say About This: A Survival Incantation Kate Rushin
credit/copyright: Rachel Eliza Griffiths

    Kate Rushin: I see the whole thing played out. I’m bludgeoned, bloody, raped. My story is reduced to filler buried in the back of the paper, on page 49, and I say, “No. No way.”

Princeton University Post Doc: Apply Now!