Anti-abortion doctors could legally lie in Arizona

March 10, 2012
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The Arizona Senate has has approved legislation that will let doctors lie about an unborn child’s health and escape any related “wrongful birth” suits, which has some saying the state is trying to trick expecting parents from opting for abortion. Arizona senators have called for a law that will, if passed, eliminate malpractice suits that are brought on by families that believe doctors willingly withheld information about their unborn children. In instances across the state, some families have sued physicians after giving birth to children with disabilities and handicaps that they believe doctors were aware of before delivery. Some state residents have waged lawsuits based on allegations that physicians were not clear with crucial information which, had the parents been privy to, could have led them to consider abortion.

If the new law is passed, doctors would not be liable in these cases for failing to make clear any and all risks the unborn child faces. Specifically, Arizona Senate Bill 1359 relieves a defendant of liability for damages in a suit “based on a claim that, but for an act or omission of the defendant, a child or children would not or should not have been born.”

Read more: RT.com

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4 Responses to Anti-abortion doctors could legally lie in Arizona

  1. robert kleinman on March 10, 2012 at 11:26 am

    Even if it is "legal", it is still unethical. A woman should then be able to complain to the Board of Medical examiners and that doctor would then be disciplined. The discipline, IMO, would be loss of license for such a willful and unethical breach of ethics. I don't understand how doctors could let this law stand.

  2. robert kleinman on March 10, 2012 at 11:26 am

    Even if it is "legal", it is still unethical. A woman should then be able to complain to the Board of Medical examiners and that doctor would then be disciplined. The discipline, IMO, would be loss of license for such a willful and unethical breach of ethics. I don't understand how doctors could let this law stand.

  3. robert kleinman on March 10, 2012 at 11:26 am

    Even if it is "legal", it is still unethical. A woman should then be able to complain to the Board of Medical examiners and that doctor would then be disciplined. The discipline, IMO, would be loss of license for such a willful and unethical breach of ethics. I don't understand how doctors could let this law stand.

  4. robert kleinman on March 10, 2012 at 11:26 am

    Even if it is "legal", it is still unethical. A woman should then be able to complain to the Board of Medical examiners and that doctor would then be disciplined. The discipline, IMO, would be loss of license for such a willful and unethical breach of ethics. I don't understand how doctors could let this law stand.

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